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Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/30/2005 :  11:42:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by leeflan

John, I agree. It would add a lot. Then I need to figure out whether I want the heavily weathered or newer paint scheme. I have pictures of both on the prototype station at Louisville. Ah well, I've got a while to decide that.



Steve,
Since you have pictures to document what you model I would vote for the heavily weathered version as I think it tends to be a more interesting structure.




John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13321 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/31/2005 :  10:06:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, you could always "split the difference" on the weathering, Steve. Assume the station was repainted in 1951.... and model the paint crew hard at work but only about a third or half of the way finished. The fresh paint would make a nice contrast to the still weathered and peeling/fading paint on the rest of the structure. The painters with their buckets and ladders (and maybe a passenger trying to dodge all of it) would make a great mini-scene.

Just a thought......




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

Dr. John
New Hire



Posted - 06/02/2005 :  3:11:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Steve,

Thanks for posting the progress on your L&WS. I've admired your modeling since I saw the article in MR about your Georgia Southern layout. Having grown up in the south, I look at your layout pics and I am struck by how well you have captured the "feel" of small southern towns and piney woods. Please continue to post pictures of your progress.


Dr. John
Piedmont & Gulf RR

Country: USA | Posts: 11 Go to Top of Page

leeflan
Fireman

Posted - 06/02/2005 :  4:46:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Dr. John, for remembering the old Georgia Southern layout. Unfortunately, it was just too "operationally challenged." The new L&WS is already more satisfying to operate running only 6-car trains, which the prototype Louisville & Wadley did all the time. I'll be back on construction as soon as my the Challenge 5 mini-layout is finished.


Country: USA | Posts: 2447 Go to Top of Page

leeflan
Fireman

Posted - 08/22/2005 :  2:01:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK, Gang, time to once again start "workin' on the railroad." Seriously, since I started working on the Cayo Loco On30 Challenge project, I managed to get absolutely zero done on the L&WS HO layout. Once the CL RR was finished, I had to spend several weeks cleaning up the layout room and workbench (well, not too much on the workbench, its just getting broken in.

So with that out of the way, I started on a B.T.S. Willit's Supply Co. kit, while I was trying to figure out where to go next on the layout itself. That question was answered by following Eddie Landreth's great "A River Runs Through It" thread over in the Craftsmans Corner. So I decided to get back to work on the Ogeechee River scene.

By way of background info, my layout is based on the prototype Louisville & Wadley Railroad, a 10 mile short line that ran from the Central of Georgia interchange at Wadley, GA up to Louisville, GA for over 100 years. The scenic highlight of the original L&W was a half-mile long trestle about a mile south of Louisville. It was also the operating bane of the railroad and eventually caused its demise as an operating entity.

There aren't many pictures of the actual trestle, and I've never been able to take pictures due to inaccessibility. RMC had a picture in the August 1974 issue, and there have been a few others that I haven't been able to add to my collection. The only real photograph I have is a postcard from the early 1900's.


I really like the low, sort of spindly look of the trestle, and feel it would be a perfect scenic highlight to the L&WS.

The trestle connects the Wadley and Louisville portions of the layout, and while it isn't half a mile long, when I constructed the benchwork and foam subroadbed, I designed the space for around a 40" trestle. Forty inches? That's a lot of trestle bents! Well, I'm basically a lazy sort of fellow and didn't want to spend a lot of time bujilding 40" of trestle bents and decks. The solution, the venerable Heljan plastic trestle kit.


Two of them, to be precise, both of which I scored real cheap on eBay, and which provided more than enough raw materials. While the kit bents are square instead of round, they have that spindly look I wanted.

In building the trestle, the first thing I did was mock up the flextrack supporting it with blocks of foam and wood. Then I did a tracing of tghe rails to use as a template so I could build the trestle at the workbench. Here's an overview of the sequence of steps:


As you can see from the box photos, the bents are all different sizes and I had to cut them down to mostly one size. So, I built a jig out of styrene and cut the bents to the correct size with a razor saw. Once the bents were cut, I distressed them heavily with the saw to simulate grain and wear. I added the cross brace, cemented the bents to the deck and butted the decks together following the template. When the entire assembly was completed, I airbrushed the entire trestle with a nondescript grayish, sort of brownish color. Finally, I installed the trestle on the layout and added the flextrack.


This view shows almost the entire trestle. Before I installed the trestle, I had to do some preliminary scenery work, especially sealing the riverbed where it joins the wall. So I added Woodland Scenics plaster cloth and sealed it with several layers of clear silicone adhesive and gave it the water test. Notice that I didn't attempt to fit the bents to the actual terrain. No need to, I'll just cover those gaps with plaster and foliage.


This closeup view sort of shows the weathering and coloring. When I get a little further along in the scenic process, I'll go back and add the guardrails to the trestle.


Finally, here's the first L&WS train to cross the new trestle; the on loan Georgia Southern 2-8-0 #43 trailed by L&WS combine #12 and business car #100.

The next step, hopefully this weekend is to build up the terrain on the Louisville end to serve as a shallow view block, then add more plaster cloth to the banks and river bed.



Country: USA | Posts: 2447 Go to Top of Page

postalkarl
Fireman



Posted - 08/22/2005 :  2:16:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Steve:

Very nice job on your RR.

Karl S.



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Tabooma County Rwy
Fireman



Posted - 08/22/2005 :  11:13:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Steve, great to see you "back at it" after the Cayo Loco mini. Looking forward to lots of progress photos and "how-to" lessons.


Country: USA | Posts: 4630 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/23/2005 :  07:48:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Steve,
That is going to be a great place to take train photos!


Bruce

Country: USA | Posts: 32543 Go to Top of Page

RichBeau
Fireman



Posted - 08/23/2005 :  08:14:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good ideas, cool tips, simple to execute and great results!

This is the kind of stuff old MR had in it that inspired us all to become better modelers.

Keep up the good work Steve.
--Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 2746 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/23/2005 :  09:01:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks good Steve. You don't often see models of long low trestles.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16057 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/23/2005 :  09:17:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great tutorial Steve.
Between you and Eddie(A river runs through it) you are posting all kinds of information that will be of value to me.
These long low trestles are common in Alaska.
I also dreaded the idea of building a large number of bents.
Thanks for the info on the Heljan kits.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Edited by - Bbags on 08/23/2005 09:18:18 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 13321 Go to Top of Page

leeflan
Fireman

Posted - 08/23/2005 :  2:26:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Tabooma County Rwy

Steve, great to see you "back at it" after the Cayo Loco mini. Looking forward to lots of progress photos and "how-to" lessons.


Yeah, Al, it is nice to get back to the L&WS layout. The CL RR project was fun and a great learning experience, but, well, it just wasn't my first love.

George & John, you're right. You really don't see a lot of long low trestles. While I envy the folks who model the mountains and have those gorgeous huge, tall trestles that are bigger than the Heljan picture, I just content myself with one that looks right for South Georgia and looks sort of like the prototype (again, just the flavor).

Rich, it was surprisingly easy to build, considering the length and accounting for the curve. But the son of a gun just dropped right into place with only minimal adjustments.

Bruce, it'll shore make a rat purty pitcher when it's done and the trains are a rollin'

thanks for the kind word.



Country: USA | Posts: 2447 Go to Top of Page

PaulD
Crew Chief



Posted - 08/23/2005 :  5:32:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Steve,
This is the first of seen of your HO Layout, the background trees, are they a real model or a photo? They sure look real. Sorry if you've answered this before.
PaulD



Country: Australia | Posts: 935 Go to Top of Page

leeflan
Fireman

Posted - 08/23/2005 :  6:04:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by PaulD

Steve,
This is the first of seen of your HO Layout, the background trees, are they a real model or a photo? They sure look real. Sorry if you've answered this before.
PaulD


Hey, Paul, those trees are real, which is to say, they are a photo of those distinctive Georgia pines. I've never been able to model these convincingly, so while on a trip to Georgia several years back, I took a picture of some trees outside of our motel room. I've been using the normal and reverse of the photo ever since. I did a short tutorial over on page 10 of the Backdrop thread in the Construction Forum.


The nice thing I've found in using the photo backdrop is that the trees register "real" in the mind of the viewer. So they don't notice so much my detailed, but still unconvincing RTR plastic pine trees from Heki you see in the photo.




Edited by - leeflan on 08/23/2005 6:22:52 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 2447 Go to Top of Page

Tabooma County Rwy
Fireman



Posted - 08/23/2005 :  9:17:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Steve, every time I see a picture from your old layout, I've got more questions. This time, I would like to know more about the house, and also the gas station, which I wonder if it is a Micro Scale kit? The house has me stumped....


Country: USA | Posts: 4630 Go to Top of Page
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