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Author Previous Topic: Yard Office Interior, need help Topic Next Topic: The Tenement and others - Brammer Salvage 1-12-20
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NBTrainDude
New Hire



Posted - 01/07/2009 :  9:14:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I picked up one of these from one of the home improvement stores. I found it was quite good at cutting scale wood, and it uses replaceable blades. I think it is used to cut vinyl tile.




Edited by - NBTrainDude on 01/07/2009 9:16:43 PM

Country: Canada | Posts: 34 Go to Top of Page

bobg
New Hire



Posted - 03/02/2009 :  12:32:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Greeetings everyone. I have been spending a lot of time cutting my own strip wood and the results have been pretty good. I am using my 10" table saw equipped with a 7 1/4" Freud think kerf blade and an Incra Fence. I would like to refine the dimensions of the wood by putting it thru a thickness sander. Has anyone tried their hand and been successful at making a thickness sander that is sized to work on the small, thin pieces of stripwood that we use in our scratch building projects? Any leads would be very much appreciated.

Regards,
Bob



Country: USA | Posts: 45 Go to Top of Page

silveradonorthern
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 06/29/2009 :  2:17:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Everyone,
While not just for scratch builders, I've found this little holder comes in handy.

After knocking over an almost full bottle of 'Rustall' I figured it was time for a change.

I can't take credit for inventing it as I know I saw something like it somewhere maybe even here on RR Line Forums.



A simple pvc fitting from the local hardware store and in this case a piece of plexiglass
(styrene or even sheet wood could be used.)

As you can see the pvc fitting is just the right size to hold common size paint bottles (Floquil,craft paint ect.) Bigger pvc fittings might be found for larger bottles.

Another little trick I learned is to paint the top of my paint bottles with the color that's inside. (See Folk Art bottle) It's easier to find a color and I know how it will look when dry.(We all know how color changes as paint dries)

Hope this helps


Michael

Country: USA | Posts: 663 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 06/29/2009 :  6:50:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Simple and nice idea, Michael. I knocked a number of bottles too, and appreciate this method to avoid spillage.


Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/29/2009 :  9:42:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Michael, Ive drilled holes in blocks of wood to hold bottles, but I like your solution better. Im going to make a couple.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16062 Go to Top of Page

DaveInTheHat
Engine Wiper



Posted - 10/16/2009 :  06:00:10 AM  Show Profile  Visit DaveInTheHat's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I've been playing with Legos a little.



https://public.fotki.com/DaveInTheHat/

https://www.facebook.com/daveinthehat/

Country: USA | Posts: 294 Go to Top of Page

hvig
Crew Chief



Posted - 10/16/2009 :  07:28:28 AM  Show Profile  Visit hvig's Homepage  Reply with Quote
My 8 year old liked that last tip. Little does he know that he will now have to share some of his Lego's with Dad!


Country: USA | Posts: 986 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/16/2009 :  7:09:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very good tip, Dave. These Legos are really versatile toys...


Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

belg
Fireman



Posted - 10/16/2009 :  7:43:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, I would cut myself a piece of flat styrene to lay inside the Legos so you can work on a flat surface and not risk dropping one wall into the recess between the tips? I made myself a square piece of plywood glued a piece of tin to it and then attached metal strips at a perfect 90 angle, this allows me to use magnets with blocks of wood glued to them to support my walls. Here's a shot of what I made. Pat


Country: USA | Posts: 4503 Go to Top of Page

DaveInTheHat
Engine Wiper



Posted - 10/16/2009 :  11:29:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit DaveInTheHat's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Since I took the picture I cut strips of plastic to put under the walls when I glue them together. It works pretty good. The tin & magnetic is a good idea too. I thought about that when I saw something like it in the Micro-Mark catalog.

https://public.fotki.com/DaveInTheHat/

https://www.facebook.com/daveinthehat/

Country: USA | Posts: 294 Go to Top of Page

belg
Fireman



Posted - 10/17/2009 :  09:07:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, thats where I got the idea from as well. It cost me only for the magnets and I think I paid $5 for all the ones in the pic as well as some little round ones not pictured. Pat


Country: USA | Posts: 4503 Go to Top of Page

TrainClown
Fireman



Posted - 10/21/2009 :  02:30:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by bobg

Greeetings everyone. I have been spending a lot of time cutting my own strip wood and the results have been pretty good. I am using my 10" table saw equipped with a 7 1/4" Freud think kerf blade and an Incra Fence. I would like to refine the dimensions of the wood by putting it thru a thickness sander. Has anyone tried their hand and been successful at making a thickness sander that is sized to work on the small, thin pieces of stripwood that we use in our scratch building projects? Any leads would be very much appreciated.

Regards,
Bob



Hi Bob, I am currently experimenting with building a thickness sander that will use a vacuum to hold the stock in place. When I get it done I'll be posting pix and plans on the forum, so keep a weather-eye out for my posts.

Here is a vacuum clamped sled saw I came up with a while back. I was cutting my own strip wood but had a hard time cutting 1" x 2"s in HO scale. Here is how I can do it now.

Vacuum Clamped Sled Saw

That's all for now.

Christopher


Clowning around with trains.


Country: Canada | Posts: 1584 Go to Top of Page

LaRueD
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/21/2009 :  10:03:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have been using a Dremel Multivise (#2500-01) to hold my structure(s) at near eye-level, when seated of course, at almost any angle, while adding weathering and other misc. details. It rotates 360 and tilts 50 and can be locked in any position. Jaw width is 7.5-inches (19 cm). This particular model clamps to any work surface up to 2.5-inches (63 mm) thick.







"Lead, follow, or get out of the way.

Country: USA | Posts: 535 Go to Top of Page

locolouie
Engine Wiper



Posted - 03/11/2010 :  12:46:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Pastels... great weathering medium; however to obtain the best use of them you need to pulverize the medium into a usable powder.

I know we have all heard of using sandpaper to obtain powder from the pastels; I never really liked that idea due to contaminates getting into the powder. Not only that, but you end up with waste (the powder that sticks to the sandpaper).

We have also heard of using a razor blade and scraping the pastel sticks to create the powder. This works relatively well, but at times you end up with chunks; again waste.

This is where this post comes into play... I found a couple of really good alternatives to the 'pulverizing' method.

1. The first item up is the "Foot Shaver" as seen below:



This tool follows the same principle as using a razor blade to scrape the pastels. However, you end up with much more consistent powder AND you have a handle to hold on to.

Here is a picture of the 'business end':



These are avaliable pretty much anywhere for about $3 to $4 in the "Health and Beauty Aids" section.

2. The second item is the "Ped Egg" as seen below:



This is my favorite tool for grinding pastels into powder form! The only item needed from the 'kit' is the blade itself. Nice thing about it is you can buy just the blades in 3-packs for about $9.

The way I use them is I lay a sheet of paper on my work surface, then set the blade's housing on the paper with the 'business end' facing up. Then, just like grating cheese I run the pastel across the teeth of the blade. In short order you end up with pretty good size pile of very fine powder on the paper with no waste and no chunks!

Image of the 'business end':



When I am done I follow it up with a quick wipe with a paper towel and your tool is clean of powder.

Here is an image of the kit packaging:



Here is an image of the 3 pack packaging:



If you do a quick search for 'Ped Egg' you can find them online. Or, if you happen to have a Sally's beauty supply they sell them there (at least both Sally's near me do). As a side note, I noticed that WalMart is selling a variant in the Revlon line (it is pink in color as opposed to white).

Hope you find this tip helpful.



Country: USA | Posts: 323 Go to Top of Page

AVRR-PA
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/11/2010 :  4:45:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi, Louis --

Excellent idea and your photographs make it clear what product you're talking about so it will be easy for me to buy my own. Thanks!

Don



Country: USA | Posts: 5005 Go to Top of Page
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