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Author Topic Next Topic: In-ko-pah RR: New project
Page: of 12

DaveInTheHat
Engine Wiper



Posted - 03/01/2016 :  3:48:55 PM  Show Profile  Visit DaveInTheHat's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Good idea. I like it.

https://public.fotki.com/DaveInTheHat/

https://www.facebook.com/daveinthehat/

Country: USA | Posts: 289 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 10/29/2016 :  12:03:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Had to go to the hardware store to get a bottle of glue. While there I like to go down the isles and see what might want to follow me home. Well in the same isles as the glue I saw this.



Being the ultimate DYIer I've discovered that in order to get anything done I need to stop trying to make my own tools and just break down a buy the tools. It sometimes takes me longer to build my own tools than buy them. Perhaps now I get some of the railroad related projects done.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 3384 Go to Top of Page

Piotr Bein
Section Hand

Posted - 10/30/2016 :  01:34:43 AM  Show Profile  Visit Piotr Bein's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I am a scale 1:24, G gauge garden modeller.
Useful on the layout: rakes of various sizes, (remove cedar needles after every storm, rake pulled out weeds), shovel and spade (remove mole-hills, shape terrain for tracks, tunnels and cities, load fill, gravel, sand for the layout), ax and saw (cutting down trees fallen/broken in storm) :)
Four foot level... I've used it to grade my track sub-base (8 ft. drop from front to back of layout, max. track slope 3%).
4 ft. = 48 in. x 0.03 = 1.5 inch = the thickness of my 2nd + 3rd fingers; to deterrmine the max. slope while building the sub-base for track, I put my 2 fingers under the lower end of level, and keep lifting it until it's level. I add earth of set a stone and have a benchmark. The grading goes fast with this "tool".
For b-day I got a cart that can be hooked up to a mowing tractor. Good for hauling larger loads (gravel, sand, sod) but I do it manually :) I like it for its large box, which I fill with materials and spread tools on top; a push into the shed and the mess is out of the way, wife off your back...
In the shop, I find the saws most useful: ever since I bought a radial and table saws, the model building became easier and faster... I used to cut-off scale board in a mitre box. When I ran out of scale boards, I tried to mill it on the radial saw -- dangerous, so I bought a table SkillSaw made in China for C$200, on a stand, with mitre slider. It works very well.
Scissors for sheet metal cut thinner wood (boards that need not be squared).
Caulking guns. As I use several types of caulk/glue often on one project, I have 4 guns for different types.
Next machine to get: a good scroll saw, as I want to build a wooden boats and ships from scratch.
Any recommended scroll saws for 1:24 scale?
Also useful is a metal sharpener for knives (a rod with ribs, on a handle, less than a buck 2nd hand). With it, I sharpen dull exacto and cutting blades.
For those working in styrofoam, here is a simple tool for shaping the material (scroll down to about the middle):
https://piotrbein.wordpress.com/2014/09/29/ilustracje-do-modeli-przytorowych-kolejki-ogrodowej/



Country: Canada | Posts: 80 Go to Top of Page

jschumaker
Fireman



Posted - 11/11/2016 :  7:09:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bernd,

I picked up one of those last month, but with only one type of grit. I will have to look for the one you found.

Jeff S.



Country: USA | Posts: 1658 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 11/11/2016 :  7:44:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jschumaker

Bernd,

I picked up one of those last month, but with only one type of grit. I will have to look for the one you found.

Jeff S.



I got mine at an Ace Hardware store. They also carry the refills. Best thing I've found so far for sanding small items.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 3384 Go to Top of Page

jschumaker
Fireman



Posted - 11/16/2016 :  1:32:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have found it works well sanding metal items. I have used it on some old HO Roundhouse all metal kits.

Jeff S.



Country: USA | Posts: 1658 Go to Top of Page

eTraxx
Fireman



Posted - 11/25/2016 :  09:18:45 AM  Show Profile  Visit eTraxx's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I added a Nominal Pipe Dim chart for various scales to my info section of my website:
http://etraxx.com/info/size-of-stuff/nominal-pipe-dim/



Country: USA | Posts: 2998 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/07/2016 :  9:15:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've been using the edge of my workbench as a guide for making 90 of cuts on small parts. Lining up a square and the part with the bench's edge was an awkward drill, so I thought I'd make a cutting board for this. Here's what I came up with:





It's made from a small cutting mat glued to a piece of 1/8 plywood. This is glued to a piece of 1/4 of plywood that is 1 wider to provide a shelf for the 90 square.



A roofers square can also be used for cutting larger parts.



George



Country: USA | Posts: 15341 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/07/2016 :  11:20:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great idea George'..Looks like it will work as you intended it to do'..



ted :<)

Country: USA | Posts: 5923 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/08/2016 :  2:06:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Ted.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 15341 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 12/08/2016 :  2:28:33 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I couldn't remember this was an on going thread. I was looking at posting my home made baking soda blaster here. I'll move it here. I had originally posted it in the Geezer thread. So here goes.

I've looked at the Horror Freight one and think it costs a bit to much, so I made one. The pictures should show what's used. Any questions will be answered to the best I can.

I basically drilled out a block of brass to fit the blast pipe into. I Loctited it in place. Then I drilled a cross hole and stuck in a brass tube in. I'm using a Passche 3oz. paint jar.



All assembled and ready to go.



Now I have to get some baking soda and have at it.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 3384 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 12/08/2016 :  5:03:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great tool idea George.

Bernd, I have a small sand blaster by Gilmour that I was never able to get sand for it. Are you saying that baking soda will do the same job for me?
The tool has this information about it;
Recommended Sand - 54 - 36 Grit Silica Sand, or Carborundum Blastite Aluminum Oxide Grain. Sand must be dry to prevent clogging.
Air powered gun connects to 1 h.p. or larger air compressor to blast off rust and paint. Uses fine sand or any fine blasting material.

Also here is a link you might consider. http://www.letterville.com/steps/hines/ keeps the fog out of the basement.




Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
Post count: 2000 posts added to below count.

Country: USA | Posts: 17750 Go to Top of Page

kebmo
Fireman



Posted - 12/08/2016 :  5:45:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
i love the cutting board idea. i'm stealing it


Country: USA | Posts: 1733 Go to Top of Page

eTraxx
Fireman



Posted - 12/08/2016 :  5:52:53 PM  Show Profile  Visit eTraxx's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I experimented a bit with a Harbor Freight Air Eraser using baking soda experimenting with eroding cracked plaster. Suppose a small stiff brush would have worked as well but .. shrug .. had the tool so why not? The biggest thing out of that is it needs to be used either outside or with a paint booth .. the dust from the baking soda is very heavy.




Country: USA | Posts: 2998 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 12/08/2016 :  7:13:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by desertdrover

Bernd, I have a small sand blaster by Gilmour that I was never able to get sand for it. Are you saying that baking soda will do the same job for me?


I'm pretty sure it would work. Buy some soda and give it a try.

I just threw the one I pictured together quick like so I could get the boxcab's painted and done. The blast nozzle needs some refinement. It'll suck the 3oz. bottle empty in no time. I think I'll make a bigger hopper for it and a smaller nozzle. I'm hooked up to a 5hp 220volt two stage compressor with an 80 gallon tank in the garage.

Baking soda is a finer grit than the silica sand. It, baking soda, works nice on plastic. Gives it a bit of tooth also. Great for removing lettering too.


quote:
Also here is a link you might consider. http://www.letterville.com/steps/hines/ keeps the fog out of the basement.


Great find. I think I'll build me one of those.

@ Ed, ya it does fog up the basement. Then you have a salty taste in your mouth to. Looks like a sand blasting cabinet is in my future.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 3384 Go to Top of Page
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