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Author Previous Topic: Yard Office Interior, need help Topic Next Topic: The Tenement and others - Brammer Salvage 1-12-20
Page: of 12

jefbar
Section Hand



Posted - 07/08/2014 :  1:19:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Some great ideas. I am going to start using wood more often. Does anyone have any experience about the "Chop It' from Micro Mark? Looks less expensive than the Chopper, particularly with the recent sale. Would I be disappointed going with this instead of the Chopper?



Country: USA | Posts: 72 Go to Top of Page

Wulf
Engine Wiper

Premium Member


Posted - 08/17/2014 :  9:09:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've been using it for year; works just fine. replaced the hinge pin once as it was getting a bit sloppy.

CEO, Lancre Valley Steam navigation Co.

Country: Canada | Posts: 185 Go to Top of Page

DaveInTheHat
Engine Wiper



Posted - 03/21/2015 :  1:40:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit DaveInTheHat's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I made a paint shaker out of an old saw.



Here's a short video of how I did it and how it works.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Haok6-_AS7k


https://public.fotki.com/DaveInTheHat/

https://www.facebook.com/daveinthehat/

Country: USA | Posts: 294 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 03/21/2015 :  2:56:33 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hey Dave,

Neat idea. Gives me an idea to use my DeWalt reciprocating saw. It comes with variable speed control.

Bernd


WWG1WGA

Country: USA | Posts: 3614 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/29/2016 :  04:55:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Don't feel like becoming a master of plaster? Use Balsa Foam.

Balsa Foam is extremely easy to carve and is impervious to solvents, glues, paints and heat. (No need for foam cutters.) Component parts can easily be attached using ACC, wood or white glue, epoxy etc. Coloring can be done using solvent or acrylic paints, soft pastels or weathering powders which can be set with alcohol, mineral spirits, or a pastel fixative, Dullcoat or hairspray. The foam has no memory, so impressions are easy to introduce into the foam surface. By applying acrylic Gesso to the carved foam, the foam surfaces become very durable without any loss of detail.

A useful tool is the small cosmetic sample brush (small white brush) shown in the picture below. Most paint brush handle tips are too large or pointed, so it's worth going into the cosmetic section of a retailer where the ladies try on make-up and obtain a cosmetic sample brush or two. The handle tip is used in a stippling stroke to introduce 3-D texture into a carved wall. The 'glue' brush (or a stiff bristle brush) is used to round the stones and remove sharp corners as well as add texture. A toothpick is all that is needed to carve the foam. The larger 1" brush is used to remove dust from the foam without damage to the carved faces.

One can easily carve the sample wall shown in less than 10 minutes.



-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 02/29/2016 05:01:19 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7237 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/29/2016 :  12:19:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow Great paint shaker'. Don't know how I missed that last March'..

Kris, Will be trying the Balsa foam shortly'...



Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 6057 Go to Top of Page

wabashbanks
Section Hand

Premium Member

Posted - 02/29/2016 :  12:43:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris,
What is balsa foam normally used for? Where can it be purchased? It looks really interesting!



Country: USA | Posts: 96 Go to Top of Page

sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/29/2016 :  1:09:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Daniel,

I get mine from Dick Blick. The stone ends on my PA German barn are made from balsa foam.



Bob


http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=30102
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=51837

Country: USA | Posts: 4028 Go to Top of Page

DaveInTheHat
Engine Wiper



Posted - 02/29/2016 :  1:19:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit DaveInTheHat's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I haven't tried balsa foam but it looks like something that I could use. I've used high density polyurethane foam. It comes in different densities and its easy to work with. Glues together with wood glue.


https://public.fotki.com/DaveInTheHat/

https://www.facebook.com/daveinthehat/

Country: USA | Posts: 294 Go to Top of Page

sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/29/2016 :  2:24:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, I think it's the same thing.

Bob


http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=30102
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=51837

Country: USA | Posts: 4028 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/29/2016 :  8:00:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Actually, balsa foam is a 'plastic' product, and not a polyurethane product, although it sure feels like a polyurethane. The product was developed for commercial model builders. It is available through Amazon, Dick Blick and other art and school supply houses. It is very safe to use and is non-toxic or allergenic. It is used in class rooms for first grade and up.

It is heat resistant, so hot glue will not melt the stuff. It will not 'melt' with the application of strong solvents like Acetone, Mineral Spirits, MEK, or alcohol. The material has a course, almost sandy surface. The sandy nature of the product makes it a bit messy to work with, but the surface represents extremely well materials such as stone, brick and concrete with just a simple paint application. It is a bit tricky to use washes on the foam as it absorbs like a sponge, but with a bit of experience this property can be used to the modelers advantage.

The foam comes in two different density or weights. The lighter, 5lb foam is called balsa foam. The heaver foam, 10lb, is called balsa foam II. For very fine detailed carving of things like bricks in HO scale, I'd recommend the heavier 10 lb. foam. For most stone work in O-scale, the lighter foam would work.

Once carved, the foam needs to have a stiffing material added. Carving both weights of foam is about like carving a stick of butter at a refrigerator temp or slightly warmer. The foam has no memory, so impressions are easy to make. The higher weight foam, balsa foam II is designed to be used as a pattern mold material if needed. Once a stiffing agent is applied to the foam, it becomes very durable. I have been using acrylic Gesso prior to painting/coloring the foam. I have had carved foam walls at clinics in model shows pass through over 200 people handling the carving and I have not been able to find any damage or coloring loss in the sample wall. Another common stiffing material for the foam is a fabric stiffing agent called "Stiffy". I have not used the fabric stiffing agent as I've had huge success with Gesso.

Lots of additional information, along with about 4 different reviews of the product can be found in my New York build thread:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=44353


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7237 Go to Top of Page

Tabooma County Rwy
Fireman



Posted - 03/01/2016 :  10:55:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'd like to add that after seeing Kris' (KP) tutorial on using Balsa Foam, I ordered some from Dick Blick (both densities) and have used it so far to make a highway bridge, bridge abutments, a building foundation, and a concrete loading dock.

At first I just painted directly onto the Balsa Foam (acrylic craft paints and also Krylon spray primer) and they worked, but the Balsa Foam did indeed soak up the paint, so multiple coats were required. Then I read somewhere (MRH, I think) about using the Gesso primer, so I bought some and primed my concrete loading dock with it (Gesso) and then one coat of craft paint was all that was required.

I'm really sold on this stuff and can see lots of modeling possibilities.

Al Carter



Country: USA | Posts: 4630 Go to Top of Page

sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/01/2016 :  11:20:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I always use Gesso over my balsa foam, three coats. The last coat I tint to whatever color I
want the mortar to be or leave it white if that's what I want.

Bob


http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=30102
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=51837

Edited by - sgtbob on 03/01/2016 11:22:15 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 4028 Go to Top of Page

pingjockey
New Hire

Posted - 03/01/2016 :  11:39:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I like using machinist squares for laying out and as guides for making parts. Since a machinist square will not lay flat, I wanted some way for the blade to lay flat on the self healing mat. I had a scrap of 3/4" baltic birch plywood laying around the shop, so I sprayed some adhesive on it and glued it to the plywood. Once it was set, I ran it through my table saw with a 60 tooth plywood blade. I now have an elevated self healing mat that is square. I can use the machinist squares from all sides and know that what I cut will be square.

My wife found the blue tub in the background at the fabric store. It is a great size to use as a workbench trash can.

In the upper left corner are various containers of applicators. Round toothpicks, flat toothpicks, plastic toothpicks, sandwich picks,bamboo picks, even a jar of straight pins. All handy. Since I use round tooth picks the most, I keep some in an old spice jar that has a flip top with 3/16" holes in it. I can easily shake out a tooth pick.

Someone mentioned double sided tape earlier. I use the permanent double sided tape, but Scotch also make a removable double-coated tape #667. It has a very low stick for a temporary hold.



Larry

~=~=~=~=~
We had too much time a while ago, but not enough time now. - Chris Ledoux

Country: USA | Posts: 39 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/01/2016 :  3:21:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I tried a similar thing, gluing a carpenter's square and a cutting pad onto a piece of MDF. The MDF warped! So your choice of high quality plywood gets my vote of approval (on this Super Tuesday :-) )

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 8437 Go to Top of Page
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