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Author Previous Topic: Lobster Shed Topic Next Topic: Printable buildings
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Scott McCabe
Engine Wiper



Posted - 03/10/2005 :  10:34:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bbags

Scott,
Thanks, that is a beautiful model and a wonderful tribute to your father.
I definitely see an influence from George Sellios in the structure.
Do you have some more scratch builds you can post for us to see.



Thanks John, George has been the biggest influence in my modeling. I visit his F&SM as much as I can. He is also a great source of information and just like his passion for the hobby. This structure was also scatch built from a photo found in the boston historical society, the photo of the model was taken last year some time, since then I have changed and added more detail. I will take another photo and show you the pic. Thanks Scott

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The LL&M
Lawrence, Lowell & Manchester Railroad Circa 1935

Country: USA | Posts: 281 Go to Top of Page

belg
Fireman



Posted - 03/10/2005 :  12:49:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I would be greatly appreciative if some of you guys would add how you attack a project and the steps you go thru. I know I work from photos and scale things as needed, now that I have learned how from Karl O my structures will probably be lot closer to prototype than before. I also build jigs for building repetitive things like bents and the supports for my mill, they are just quick things that don't take long to make but speed up construction a ton. Thanks Pat


Country: USA | Posts: 4502 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/10/2005 :  1:20:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by belg

I would be greatly appreciative if some of you guys would add how you attack a project and the steps you go thru. I know I work from photos and scale things as needed, now that I have learned how from Karl O my structures will probably be lot closer to prototype than before. I also build jigs for building repetitive things like bents and the supports for my mill, they are just quick things that don't take long to make but speed up construction a ton. Thanks Pat




Pat,
That is an idea that I have been thinking about for a while.
Since I just became the moderator of this forum along with Shamus I have not had the opportunity to add all the different topics that I would like to see appear here.
I would rather this thread just be for pictures as it will get very large if we go into all the different facets of scratch building.
However I will in the coming days be adding threads that will be hints for better and more accurate scratch building, how to's, and any other things that might be of interest to others.
So stay tuned as there will be more.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13289 Go to Top of Page

MP Rich
Fireman



Posted - 03/10/2005 :  5:24:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There are some really great scratch projects here and some truly fine craft work. It would almost lead one to believe that this scratch building stuff must be hard and really time consuming to get anything done. I want to throw in a couple things that prove it is not that way at all. Once you get started there is just no limit to the number of things you can find a need for if you want to scratch build them. I currently am in the business of tearing down a layout and so these are not in their natural setting and take a bit of imagination so see the value without any supporting scenery.
Just some small stuff to add to the scene

In the Ozarks these used to pop along the roads every summer. This one has a new roof and plywood sides along with a new paint job and sign. Ready for business. It's the type thing you can build while traveling with very limited tools and supplies. Certainly not a kit you will find very often.





Tanks and pumphouses like this make a nice quick job to scratch. No real specific sizes needed. You can just built it to fit your space.

When you don't have time or energy to tackle a biggie, try thinking small for a change. Even if it is totally a bust you will have less than a cup of coffee invested and it may just get the creative juices flowing again.
Richard



Country: USA | Posts: 1762 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/10/2005 :  5:36:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well said Richard.
Not everything has to be a large project just some small things that you see in the real world every day that you could easily make on your own.
For example, saw horses, picnic tables, chairs benches, etc.
Give it a try and I think you will like it.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13289 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/10/2005 :  6:46:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Following Richard's lead with small detail items, here are three that I built to replace the solid castings that came with a kit. The crates did not take long to build, and best of all they're empty (unlike solid castings), so the modeler can put other detail parts in them or just leave them empty as though they had just been unpacked.






Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

Scott McCabe
Engine Wiper



Posted - 03/10/2005 :  7:37:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MikeC

Following Richard's lead with small detail items, here are three that I built to replace the solid castings that came with a kit. The crates did not take long to build, and best of all they're empty (unlike solid castings), so the modeler can put other detail parts in them or just leave them empty as though they had just been unpacked.







Mike, Great looking crates, love the realistic look you achieved with them. Keep the pics comming.

Scott McCabe


The LL&M
Lawrence, Lowell & Manchester Railroad Circa 1935

Country: USA | Posts: 281 Go to Top of Page

belg
Fireman



Posted - 03/10/2005 :  7:51:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Come on Mike those are the real thing your trying to pass off. :-) What size are these little beauties?



Country: USA | Posts: 4502 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/10/2005 :  8:29:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, guys.

They're HO scale, Pat. I don't remember the actual sizes now, but I think they're about 4' X 3' or maybe 5' X 3'. They're in the "yard" of my Barton's Welding scene.



Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/10/2005 :  11:02:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Richard,
I agree that scratchbuilding little items can be both fun and rewarding. Here are three examples-- pallets, drum racks,and saw horses (all HO scale).







Country: USA | Posts: 30787 Go to Top of Page

belg
Fireman



Posted - 03/11/2005 :  08:24:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice additions Bruce. I will have to "borrow" some of these little beauties I think they will make some added detail right where I have a bare wall and I have alot of those. Did you make them from plans or wing it? Pat


Country: USA | Posts: 4502 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/11/2005 :  09:52:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Excellent details, Bruce! I especially like the drum rack. That's an idea that's going into my notebook!




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/11/2005 :  7:54:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, guys. Pat, the pallets and saw horse are free-lance. The drum rack came from an article in old issue of MR. The horse is a bit of a pain to make because of its size compared to my fat fingers. The others you can knock out quite quickly.


Country: USA | Posts: 30787 Go to Top of Page

Marken
Fireman



Posted - 03/11/2005 :  8:33:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Sorry...wrong forum...had another senior moment.


In memory of Mike Chambers

Edited by - Marken on 03/11/2005 9:25:17 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 2963 Go to Top of Page

JBL
Engine Wiper

Premium Member


Posted - 03/12/2005 :  2:15:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just finished another scratchbuilding project. I began building this 1:20.3 DSP-Waycar in august2004.



Jens



Edited by - JBL on 03/12/2005 2:17:38 PM

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