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Page: of 67

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/13/2008 :  10:31:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I don't know how I missed these last few postings.

Nelson, nice work on the hoist, I'd like to hear how you did the motor too.

John, the hangar and the interior details are awesome. The interior shot could be mistaken for the real thing.

Terrell, that's an excellent looking water tower. The bird's nest is a nice little detail.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16374 Go to Top of Page

Terrell
Fireman

Posted - 05/14/2008 :  08:35:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by JohnReid

COOL! How did you do the water?



Thanks, John and George. The tank was built around a large shipping tube that I cut shorter than the staves. This formed a shelf on the inside. I cut a piece of acetate to fit and then coated it with Mod-Podge Gloss Lustre, found at Walmart or Michaels. Probably, a dozen coats were added. One layer I added a thin wash of green acrylic paint to the mix. The Mod-podge dries very clear and gives it a nice sheen.



Country: USA | Posts: 2291 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 06/02/2008 :  10:06:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi all, Sorry I had not gotten back to this thread. I got carried away with the 2 month challenge. I finally found my very rough sketch on the hoist mechanism for the crane. I am going to try and make head and tails out of what i got and re-do it and post what I have. Having done this about a year ago, my notes are usually scattered and were more fresh in my mind than on paper; but, I will endeavor to give some form of instruction. Please bear with me, I hadn't forgotten all together.
Tony Burgess


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3151 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 06/03/2008 :  11:52:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Here it is guys and gals, the instructions I promised you:

I hope I can make this easy to understand. I made up a diagram of the hoist in Microsoft paint. This is for the hoist part only, not the frame, which is made of brass shapes.


The hoist was all made of styrene. The smaller drum on the left is 1/8” solid styrene rod, with a ½ section filed down. I found it easier to do this on the end of the rod, and then cut everything to length. I also hollowed out the top half a bit for chain clearance. I chose a ‘pin’ small enough to go through the drum, and allow the chain to loop over the top of it. I think it was .030” diameter. Due to the tight constraints of scale, I could not attach the end of the chain to the inside as it should be, so I pinned it to the outside of the drum, this can be seen in the first and second photo on the forum. The drum pin is drilled slightly off center, to the lower side. The chain, not assembled at this stage, drops down here, then loops back up and over the pin and down again to hold the hook.

Now for the right larger side: it is simply .030” styrene sheet cut into two circles .200” in diameter, with a .030 pin through the center. If you can get away with a larger pin, that’s fine too. It just needs clearance enough to allow the second chain to go through. To hold the pieces together, I just cut a small strip of styrene to cover the top section. On one side of the .200” styrene edge I drilled a small hole and fashioned a hook out of .015” wire. Super glue the hook on.

Now it is just a matter of cementing the two sections together, while installing the chain on the small drum. Note: the two sections are offset as on the drawing, but level at the top. The larger one you can either fish the chain through after, or drape it over the pin before you glue the top cover piece on. I found it easy to do if I had the larger side hooked onto a piece of wire I had clamped to something to steady it; that way my hands were free to hold it all together while it dried.

As for the rollers on the I beam, the diagram should easily show how it goes together. Thin styrene sheet cut to a trapezoidal shape with a couple of small bits of styrene rod glued to one side to act as wheels on the I beam. A hole is drilled through for a styrene rod which also has a small bit of 1x4 or something close, with two holes in it (styrene hook on drawing), one hole for the pin, the other for the hook.

The pull chain needs to be fully looped, as the operator pulls on this to activate the gearing inside the drum to raise and lower the hook. I hope I have explained it all right, and clearly, but if you have any questions, I will try my best to answer them.

Good luck, and if you make one, I’d love to see it. I made another one for another scratchbuilt project (Sassens Vinegar), and this one had a chain bag, just as the one I have at work. An interesting extra bit of detail. I have included a picture of that for you too.





Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Edited by - Nelson458 on 06/03/2008 11:58:12 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 3151 Go to Top of Page

bitlerisvj
Fireman

Posted - 06/03/2008 :  12:29:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Tony,
I am sure glad to see you posting your stuff on these Forums. I thik we are all in for a treat. I love the results of your work and now you even show and tell us how you do these things.
Thanks and regards, Vic Bitleris
quote:
Originally posted by Nelson458

Here it is guys and gals, the instructions I promised you:

I hope I can make this easy to understand. I made up a diagram of the hoist in Microsoft paint. This is for the hoist part only, not the frame, which is made of brass shapes.


The hoist was all made of styrene. The smaller drum on the left is 1/8” solid styrene rod, with a ½ section filed down. I found it easier to do this on the end of the rod, and then cut everything to length. I also hollowed out the top half a bit for chain clearance. I chose a ‘pin’ small enough to go through the drum, and allow the chain to loop over the top of it. I think it was .030” diameter. Due to the tight constraints of scale, I could not attach the end of the chain to the inside as it should be, so I pinned it to the outside of the drum, this can be seen in the first and second photo on the forum. The drum pin is drilled slightly off center, to the lower side. The chain, not assembled at this stage, drops down here, then loops back up and over the pin and down again to hold the hook.

Now for the right larger side: it is simply .030” styrene sheet cut into two circles .200” in diameter, with a .030 pin through the center. If you can get away with a larger pin, that’s fine too. It just needs clearance enough to allow the second chain to go through. To hold the pieces together, I just cut a small strip of styrene to cover the top section. On one side of the .200” styrene edge I drilled a small hole and fashioned a hook out of .015” wire. Super glue the hook on.

Now it is just a matter of cementing the two sections together, while installing the chain on the small drum. Note: the two sections are offset as on the drawing, but level at the top. The larger one you can either fish the chain through after, or drape it over the pin before you glue the top cover piece on. I found it easy to do if I had the larger side hooked onto a piece of wire I had clamped to something to steady it; that way my hands were free to hold it all together while it dried.

As for the rollers on the I beam, the diagram should easily show how it goes together. Thin styrene sheet cut to a trapezoidal shape with a couple of small bits of styrene rod glued to one side to act as wheels on the I beam. A hole is drilled through for a styrene rod which also has a small bit of 1x4 or something close, with two holes in it (styrene hook on drawing), one hole for the pin, the other for the hook.

The pull chain needs to be fully looped, as the operator pulls on this to activate the gearing inside the drum to raise and lower the hook. I hope I have explained it all right, and clearly, but if you have any questions, I will try my best to answer them.

Good luck, and if you make one, I’d love to see it. I made another one for another scratchbuilt project (Sassens Vinegar), and this one had a chain bag, just as the one I have at work. An interesting extra bit of detail. I have included a picture of that for you too.








Country: USA | Posts: 1449 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 06/03/2008 :  5:03:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by bitlerisvj

Hi Tony,
I am sure glad to see you posting your stuff on these Forums. I thik we are all in for a treat. I love the results of your work and now you even show and tell us how you do these things.
Thanks and regards, Vic Bitleris


Thank you Vic, that is very kind of you to say.
I have found the next best thing to modeling is sharing. If I have no one to share it with, I wonder what the point is? I hope I can inspire others and help in their efforts to become better at what they do.
Tony


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3151 Go to Top of Page

compressor man
Section Hand

Posted - 06/03/2008 :  7:07:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Tony,
Great looking chain hoist. I cannot tell you how many times I have used one just like that. Just in case anyone would like to know, the roller device that is mounted on the I-beam is called a trolley.


Regards,
Chris

Country: USA | Posts: 69 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 06/03/2008 :  7:19:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the plans and explanations, Tony. Your model of the chain hoist is a great one.


Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 06/03/2008 :  8:27:38 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by compressor man

Hi Tony,
Great looking chain hoist. I cannot tell you how many times I have used one just like that. Just in case anyone would like to know, the roller device that is mounted on the I-beam is called a trolley.



A Trolley! thanks, I have one I use at work every day. Thought it was a carriage. maybe in England it is a carriage. HHmmm!!!
Tony Burgess


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3151 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 06/03/2008 :  8:31:54 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Frederic Testard

Thanks for the plans and explanations, Tony. Your model of the chain hoist is a great one.



You are most welcome.
Tony


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3151 Go to Top of Page

Terrell
Fireman

Posted - 06/13/2008 :  10:15:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
An update on the nearly completed (is anything ever completely finished?) O scale station module.





Background courtesy of Mother nature.



Country: USA | Posts: 2291 Go to Top of Page

Miles
Crew Chief

Posted - 06/13/2008 :  3:19:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit Miles's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Very beautiful work Terrel. Your subtle weathering and attention to weathering and other scenic details, not to mention that awesome looking whistle stop of a station makes for a beautiful scene.

Are those 1:48 scale vechicles or 1:50 and 1:43?



Country: | Posts: 514 Go to Top of Page

Terrell
Fireman

Posted - 06/13/2008 :  6:06:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Miles. The vehicles are 1:43. Both New Ray, I believe.


Country: USA | Posts: 2291 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 06/13/2008 :  10:55:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Outstanding construction there Terrell. And nice pictures, Mother nature did it justice! :-)


Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
Post count: 5000 posts added to below count.

Country: USA | Posts: 16062 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 06/14/2008 :  6:09:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great work, Terrell. Did you do yourself the paint job on the character? The shining right shoe is a great detail.


Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page
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