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Author Previous Topic: Clugstons Store Topic Next Topic: Lous Cowboy Hat _How-to
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Dutchman
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Posted - 02/11/2005 :  10:34:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
George,
That was a neat trick, turning the H&R back in to create depth!



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George D
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Posted - 02/13/2005 :  10:56:30 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Bruce - I read about that somewhere and I thought I'd give it a try.

I received my front doors from Tichy and I see what you mean Bruce - it's no problem to cut them apart so they can be glued open. For those that just joined in, this started on the Prototype Structures for Modeling page where Bruce suggested that the Tichy 8053 doors would work for the front of the building.

The problem I now have is, if they're modeled open, I'll need individual window panes because a sheet of clear styrene behind the frame would be visible. Does anyone know an easy way to cut out precise fitting little windows? These little buggers are 6" x 12". A while back I tried that liquid stuff you fill window frames with, but didn't like the results - maybe I was doing it wrong.

George




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Dutchman
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Posted - 02/13/2005 :  12:33:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by George D


A while back I tried that liquid stuff you fill window frames with, but didn't like the results - maybe I was doing it wrong.


George
I have been getting pretty good results with MicroMark's Glaze. I also have the Testors' Canopy glue that can also be used to glaze windows.

I think that it is worth another try.



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George D
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Posted - 02/13/2005 :  1:29:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman
I have been getting pretty good results with MicroMark's Glaze. I also have the Testors' Canopy glue that can also be used to glaze windows.



Bruce,
When I consider the alternative is cutting out those little buggers, I guess it'll pay for me do become proficient with my Testors' canopy glue. Is one better than the other?

George




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belg
Fireman



Posted - 02/13/2005 :  2:48:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bruce does the glazing become hard so that you can represent a bullet hole or make broken panes?? I have used gallery glass for all my windows and it never becomes hard, it is solid but soft. Pat


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Dutchman
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Posted - 02/13/2005 :  3:01:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
George,
I have been using the MicroMark Glaze for my windows, and the Testors to glue acetate to other windows. So, I haven't tried the Testors to glaze the windows yet.

I would suggest starting from the bottom of the window and working up. That way any excess will not accumulate on the door panels.

Pat, I haven't tried to crack those windows. I will have to try that.



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George D
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Posted - 02/16/2005 :  3:06:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well I have the building shell completed.

I tapered the ends of the walls before I joined them like a miter joint. I did that by scraping the edges with a #11 blade to get it down to a 45 or smaller angle. It doesn't have to be precise as long as you maintain a straight edge and it's 45 or less. If you lay the face of the wall on a steel ruler with the edge of the wall even with the edge of the ruler, you can control the removal of material. Everything is glued together with ACC. I used a gel that I bought at Home Depot. I added the corner reinforcing pieces after I joined the two sides.

The walls are painted with a dark red primer and the mortar lines are white grout. This was sealed with Dull Cote. I then gave it a wash of black oil paint.

I plan to put a concrete floor in it, so you'll notice the bottom horizontal wall bracing is not at the bottom edge. I made no attempt at locating the bracing so it would reinforce the floor - I'll take my chances with it just glued to the sides (I may use epoxy here).

The chimney is a piece of 3/16 balsa covered with H&R brick sheeting. I made a cap that will be glued on after I get the roof in place.





Next I plan to paint the windows and doors. I'm still trying to figure how I'm going to put window panes in the doors. Bruce, I'm leaning toward your idea of the liquid glazing - I'm still playing with it. The idea of cutting little pieces of clear plastic to precise dimensions is a little scary.

I'm planning on covering the interior of side walls with brick paper. I want some detail on the interior, but only the part that can be seen through an open door or two - nothing extensive. I really haven't done much thinking about the roof and the front metal awning yet.

George



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wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 02/16/2005 :  3:47:03 PM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Looks great, George! If you plan on an interior, will you be able to see the parts of the window you folded back? Or will you hide those, somehow?

Chuck



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Dutchman
Administrator

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Posted - 02/16/2005 :  3:56:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
George,
It is coming very nicely! I like your solution to the chimney. That matches the prototype. That means that you have made the rear wall into two pieces, correct?

As to the windows. When Karl O. recently posted his completed pictures of Houligans, I asked what he had used on some windows that he had tilted open. Here is his response:

The glazing is called Gallery Glass (Crystal Clear)#16081 made by Plaid Enterprises. It is available at craft shops.

I haven't used this product, but I remember John and Mike talking about it. I assume that it is similar to the Testors and MicroMark product.



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George D
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Posted - 02/16/2005 :  4:13:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Chuck. Thanks for the comment. The interior brick paper will cover the folded back parts. I may have to trim them a bit so they're flush with the interior styrene bracing strips.

Bruce. Thanks for the comment too. I learned to make chimneys from this site: http://www.horailroad.com/clinic1/cl1_intro.htm The only drawback is the corners are lap joints not mitered like the walls. Yes, the back wall is two pieces. Notice the heavy bracing to keep everything straight.

I'm headed to Michaels tomorrow to check on the Gallery Glass. It's worth a try.

I have six windows modified and painted on one side. I'll paint the other side tomorrow.

George



Edited by - George D on 02/16/2005 10:15:37 PM

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k9wrangler
Engineer



Posted - 02/16/2005 :  5:20:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lookin' good!



Karl Scribner
Sunfield Twp. Michigan
H.M.F.I.C
Kentucky Southern Railway
The Spartan Line

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George D
Moderator

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Posted - 02/16/2005 :  10:16:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Karl.


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Rick
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Posted - 02/17/2005 :  07:39:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
George, it's coming together nicely. Thanks for the pictures.


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Bbags
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Posted - 02/17/2005 :  10:04:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
George,
I see that you have made substantial progress in the few days that my computer was down.

I have used the Plaid Gallery glass with good results.
Hope it works for you.
One time when I used Dull Cote over the Gallery Glass I ended up with small holes in the glass.
I think maybe the Gallery glass was not completely dry.
Now I do not use Dull Cote as the glass has a look of old time glass with some distortions in the surface which add to the look.

Looking forward to more progress photos and also to Bruce joining you when he returns from Texas.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

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George D
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Premium Member


Posted - 02/17/2005 :  11:40:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the comments Rick and John. I've been on a roll, but that's going to slow down since we're heading to my son's house on Friday for the long weekend.

Glad you're back with us John. I'd be lost without this machine. Thanks for the tip. I'll be keeping the Dull Cote away from the Gallery Glass.

I bought some this morning and have some drying in an old window from my scrap box. Now I have to test my patience and stay away from it till it dries properly. Bruce, #16081 is a large bottle. I found the same stuff in a 2 oz bottle. The number for that is: 16001.

I agree with you John, I'm anxious to see what Bruce comes up with.

George



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