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Author Previous Topic: G10 WWII German Boxcar in 1:6 scale (BIG!) Topic Next Topic: Pipeline
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ANo10
Fireman



Posted - 09/03/2004 :  09:57:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bruce,

It's shaping up great. Excellent idea and tutorial.

Jim

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 2773 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/03/2004 :  10:19:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great start, Bruce!

This is the first time I have seen wood stained with the MicroMark weathering solution. I have frequently wondered what kind of results it produced. Now I know, and it looks pretty good. Thanks for the photo!




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

jkristia
Engine Wiper

Premium Member

Posted - 09/03/2004 :  11:27:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I will be following this thread too, can always learn new tricks :)

I thought that the MicroMark 'AgeIt-Easy' was basically just A&I (maybe alcohol and brown ink instead of black ink), and it seems pretty expensive to me, $6 for a small bottle, but now I'm thinking maybe I should give it a try after all.

Thanks
Jesper



Country: USA | Posts: 317 Go to Top of Page

postalkarl
Fireman



Posted - 09/03/2004 :  12:52:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi All:

As I said above I have this structure on my layout. If you look under Karl Scholz's layoout pictures in the phtography forum you'll see it there. It's a light green building that is with the general store and gas station. The sign on the front say's Mooney's plumbing. It's a great little building. George Sellios also has one on his layout. I believe it was originally an article by John Allen.

Karl S.



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nalmeida
Fireman



Posted - 09/03/2004 :  2:17:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit nalmeida's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Karl, now you raised my curiosity, I can't find the thread you are talking about, do you have a link?


Country: Portugal | Posts: 2040 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/03/2004 :  3:22:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Karl, you did a great job with that model. I have printed out a picture for my reference as I proceed.

Nelson, you can find that picture at this link:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=6024

It is in the fourth picture down, the green building on the left.


Bruce

Country: USA | Posts: 32054 Go to Top of Page

nalmeida
Fireman



Posted - 09/03/2004 :  4:20:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit nalmeida's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Bruce.

Amazing work Karl, almost everyone can do something following a plan but only true artists create masterpieces!



Country: Portugal | Posts: 2040 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/03/2004 :  9:26:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK, time for some decisions.

The strip wood could be oriented either horizontally or vertically. I decided to make my siding vertical. Next, there are many ways to build the wall, but the two that I considered were: (1) build the frame first and then glue the siding to the frame (the way you do it in the real world), or (2) lay the siding on some double sided tape, then glue the frame to the siding. (I saw this technique suggested in a kit by Mainline & Siding). Since this is a tutorial for beginners, I opted for the second approach.

If you do it this way remember two things:

(1) place the side of the board that you want on the outside of the building face down on the tape, and

(2) your walls will be the mirror image (reversed left to right) of what the plans look like.


Before placing the stripwood on the tape, I extended the lines forming the walls in all directions so that they would be visible beyound the stripwood (to guide cutting the wood.)

This picture will give you the idea.



At some point, it is a good idea to start working from the other end of the wall as well. That way if a board needs to be cut (narrowed), it will be one in the middle of the wall. (A tip I picked up from Mike.)



Here you can see that I am starting to scribe the cut to even off the top of the wall. (Now you can see the advantage of extending the wall lines beyond the actual wall.



In this next picture, you can see that I have made pencil marks where I need to cut for the window and door. For the window, I made the bottom of the window 2' from the floor and then measured the dimensions of the backside of the window casting that would fit into the opening to get the other boundaries. Since I am building the door out of wood, its width is flexible, so I used two of the vertical joints and just had to mark were the top of the door would be.

In this picture, you can also see that I have started gluing the stipwood bracing (framing) to the rear of the wall. I decided to use 1/32" x 1/16th inch wood. (Since the siding is 1/32", and the bracing is 1/32",I will be able to use 1/16th inch square stock for the corners of the building. It makes life easy.)



More later.


Bruce

Edited by - Dutchman on 09/12/2004 03:01:29 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 32054 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/03/2004 :  9:49:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is a picture of the bracing that I put on the back of the wall and the openings for the window and door. I wanted enough bracing to hold the vertical siding in place securely, and it was successful. (You can see that I glued the 1/16th inch side of the bracing to the siding.)

By the way, those are the two different blades that I used to cut the openings in the siding.



And, here is what the first wall looks like at this point.



Bruce

Country: USA | Posts: 32054 Go to Top of Page

teejay
Fireman



Posted - 09/03/2004 :  9:53:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well ,I just learned something already Bruce as I've never used that style of blade before ( the flat one ) but it sure makes sense .

Thanks, TERRY



Country: Canada | Posts: 5853 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/03/2004 :  9:59:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bruce, it's coming along very nicely! The M&S method is a new one to me, so I've learned another technique for framing and siding a building.

TJ, the blade Bruce is showing is a #17 X-acto chisel, and it's great for cutting/trimming stripwood. Another good choice is the #18 blade, which is broader and heavier. I go through both of those about as much as I do a #11. You should try them.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/04/2004 :  8:51:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The second wall is nearing completion. I will just show a few pictures to illustrate a point or two.

The first two pictures show the benefit of extending the lines beyound the building for trimming purposes.





If you look in that last picture, you can see a plank 6 in from the left that is narrower the the others. This illustrates what I mentioned earlier about working in from both edges in case you need to trim a board to fit into a gap that is narrower than a full-sized board.

Here is a picture of the wall marked out for the three windows and the door.



This is what I meant when I said that you get the dimensions of the window opening by measuring the rear of the window. (That thicker area that will fit into the opening.)



Bruce

Country: USA | Posts: 32054 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/05/2004 :  8:28:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well the front wall is done. Here is a picture of the bracing on the back of the wall and a shot of the outside of the wall.





I will build the remaining two walls using the same techniques as I did with the first two walls. After that, I will build the two doors out of stripwood.


Bruce

Country: USA | Posts: 32054 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/05/2004 :  9:22:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's coming along very nicely, Bruce! Good job.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

teejay
Fireman



Posted - 09/06/2004 :  12:58:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Doing a heck of a job Bruce . You'll win an Emmy for this one .

TERRY



Country: Canada | Posts: 5853 Go to Top of Page
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