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 Weather or not: Discussion, Tips, Techniques
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Author Previous Topic: Quick Tip #6 and #7 Topic Next Topic: Final pics of FSM JS #18 Westside Auto
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Will Robinson
Section Hand



Posted - 09/01/2004 :  11:31:58 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Mike and Mic for the postings.
Amazing work! An Inspiration!
Its great having these tips and techniques shared.
thanks Will.



Country: Canada | Posts: 71 Go to Top of Page

n/a
deleted

Posted - 09/02/2004 :  03:45:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mic,

What scale is the wrecker model? 1/25th? Would you be willing to share how you got the wonderful peeling paint technique on the firehouse wall.

Marc



Country: | Posts: 1147 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/02/2004 :  11:02:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mic, I'm eager to try your dirt and Diosol method. It sounds similar to a method I have used for several years. Instead of dirt, I use chalk powder, and instead of Diosol, I use alcohol. Sometimes, I mix the chalk and alcohol into a slurry (the consistency varies from thin to thick, depending on how I'm going to use it.) and paint it on with a soft brush. That's how I rusted the rivets and welds on the tank car in the photo below:



Other times, I coat the object with dry chalk powder (similar to your dirt method) and then dribble alcohol from a brush on the dry chalk. To get heavy, flaking rust such as on the oil tank below or the boiler below that, I repeat the procedure as many times as it takes to get a layer of texture on the surface.





In studying your photos, however, I see a lot of advantages to the dirt/diosol method. For one thing, the dirt and rust seems to have a far more realistic texture and appearance to it than what I'm achieving with the powdered chalk and alcohol. So, I'm eager to try it.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/02/2004 :  9:57:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mic Greenberg

Hello all and let me introduce myself. This is Mic Greenberg, modeler of yesteryear and hopefully current participant in many discussions of how-to methods with all of you. I have
been reading with avid interest the comments on "Weathering" and since this is a not unfamiliar subject I thought I would weigh in as well. My first posting in this area has to do with
the speculation on dirt and Diosol. I have used this way of dusting and weathering vehicles and structures to some satisfaction. Here is what I do. First find some really fine and
clinging dusty type dirt. Shift it to even finer consistency if necessary. It should act like this; when you dip your finger in the stuff your finger should be noticeably dusty. Make sure
any surface you want to dust up has had sufficient time for the paint to cure. Cured Floquil paints are impervious to Diosol after a suitable period of time (a week to make sure).
Now you can pour this dirt over the area, shake off the larger particles and what should remain is a dusty object. Then squirt Diosol to saturate the area. Immediately begin drying
with a hairdryer. What happens is a natural and permanent dusty appearance follows. The drying will cause "ringlets" of dust like the way a puddle dries in a parking lot on a hot day.
The following photos may help with this description.

Moderator's Note: Mic, as I said earlier, welcome to RR-L. Glad to see your first posting.

Mic sent me several photos yesterday and today. He's still learning the ins and outs of photo posting, so I'll post one he sent me today. I believe this one is representative of what he's describing above:








Mic,
I would also like to welcome you to our group of modelers who are always looking to improve our techniques.
Since I am new to modeling I missed your work the first time around.
However, thanks to Mike and Nick Ogden(Nick O) I have admired your work here on the forum.
Nick even found a copy of the Mar/Apr 1982 NG&SLG at a bookseller in the UK that I was able to purchase after seeing the Pillar Point Marine Railway discussed here on the forum.
Since I like to combine railroading with waterfronts this is my favorite diorama and I hope someday to be able to have something similar on my layout.
So welcome aboard and I will be watching for your expertise in the future.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13306 Go to Top of Page

Mic Greenberg
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/05/2004 :  6:56:07 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mic Greenberg's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Marc

The truck is indeed a wrecker that was featured in Fine Scale Modeler in the fall of 1983. It is a good model for the demonstration of discussed techniques because at 1/2 in. effects are quite telling. On the Wickman Farm Supplies truck, an early 80s model in 1/4 in. the paint is peeled using the a rubber cement resist applied with one's fingers in a delicate and random fashion. It works because you are really peeling the paint from the surface. More later in greater detail as I hope to continue some how-to publications, kind of updating the books that Gary Nash and I authored way back when. Thanks for your interest and enthusiasm.

Mic


Visit my website:
www.micgreenberg.com

Country: USA | Posts: 152 Go to Top of Page

TrevorCreek
Fireman



Posted - 09/05/2004 :  8:39:31 PM  Show Profile  Click to see TrevorCreek's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Mic,

Welcome to the forum. I have been a big fan of your work over the years. I am looking forward to seeing more of your work and articles in the future.

Frank Bernard



Country: USA | Posts: 1028 Go to Top of Page

Rick
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/06/2004 :  08:37:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mic, welcome to the forum and thanks for the tips. I look forward to more posts from you and any new articles or books. Have you ever considered doing a weathering video?


Country: USA | Posts: 22746 Go to Top of Page

n/a
deleted

Posted - 09/06/2004 :  4:31:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I found this posted on the Yahoo Weathering group
quote:
Does "Faux paint faded wood" nicely).

For faded wood on white styrene try Pine Canyon Scale Models Woodsy Stains
.... They are a series of three stains that are applied directly over white
styrene. When applied correctly the results are amazing.

Website: http://www.pinecanyonscalemodels.com/

Rick


Has anyone here used this stuff?? If so would you be willing to share youre experience with it, and any detail photos of it in use? I am most curious.

Marc



Country: | Posts: 1147 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/06/2004 :  8:28:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I agree with Marc. I'd like to know more about this stuff, if anyone has any experience with it. I'm also curious about their driftwood stain listed at the bottom of the page. I wonder if it works on real wood, or if it's also just for styrene.
http://www.pinecanyonscalemodels.com/woodsy_stains.htm




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

teejay
Fireman



Posted - 09/08/2004 :  10:25:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote






Here are a couple of different weathering attempts in that I used the wet paint and water technique on the scratch built styrene pipes and then tried the Dullcoat ( both spray and bottle ) and alchol on the walls of the building . I expected a different result with the latter . maybe I did something wrong ?

TERRY



Country: Canada | Posts: 5853 Go to Top of Page

Marken
Fireman



Posted - 09/08/2004 :  11:15:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Were you expecting the walls to turn white-ish Terry? I accidently used an alcohol wash on some fire escapes after Dull Coteing and that's what happened.

Maybe a heavier wash of alcohol?????????

The pipes look great!


In memory of Mike Chambers

Country: USA | Posts: 2972 Go to Top of Page

teejay
Fireman



Posted - 09/09/2004 :  12:22:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ken , yeah I was expecting something whitish . So answer me this , if you please .

1) does it matter if you use dullcoat spray or bottle ?

2) does it matter which goes on first ....dullcoat or alcohol ?

3) do you necessarily let one dry before applying the other ?

Thanks, TERRY



Country: Canada | Posts: 5853 Go to Top of Page

n/a
deleted

Posted - 09/09/2004 :  01:03:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Terry,

Dullcoat first, then alcohol. Dullcoat dries pretty quick, so I would say maybe 5 mins after application....it will work if you wait longer, but why not test a couple at different times on a sample (then you can post pics of your test results [:-grin])....

I like using spray, as the coat is more consistant/even, which may help a bit with control while washing with alc.

Remeber...whatever you do...test it on something else first.

Marc



Country: | Posts: 1147 Go to Top of Page

n/a
deleted

Posted - 09/09/2004 :  03:49:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For those interested in reading about additional ways to work with, paint, and weather hydrocal castings, you might want to visit CC Crows website, and read through his "Clinics".
http://www.cccrow.com/main-pages/home-list.html
For those unfamiliar with CC Crow, he makes hdrocal craftsman kits, and hyrocal wall and pavement castings; he is also the new owner of Builders In Scale.

Marc



Country: | Posts: 1147 Go to Top of Page

Gerry
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/09/2004 :  10:28:52 AM  Show Profile  Visit Gerry's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by marc_reusser

Dullcoat first, then alcohol. Dullcoat dries pretty quick, so I would say maybe 5 mins after application....


A semi-interesting aside: I once asked Wayne Wesolowski -- who plays a Chemistry PhD in real life -- what was happening chemically with the Dullcote/alcohol thing.

He hadn't experimented with it, but his theory was that the alcohol was dissolving the lacquer in the Dullcote and leaving behind the now-very-visible white talc. Interesting.


Gerry (MMR #346)

Country: USA | Posts: 264 Go to Top of Page
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