Railroad Line Forums - Weather or not: Discussion, Tips, Techniques
Railroad Line Forums
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Sponsors   Support the RRLine   Guestbook   FAQ     Register
Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Live Chat | Avatar Legend | Search | Statistics
Photo Album | File Lister | File Library
[ Active Members: 2 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 117 ]  [ Total: 119 ]  [ Newest Member: Bigbandito ]
 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Mike Chambers' Craftsman's Corner
 Weather or not: Discussion, Tips, Techniques
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Author Previous Topic: Quick Tip #6 and #7 Topic Next Topic: Final pics of FSM JS #18 Westside Auto
Page: of 26

Gerry
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/23/2004 :  12:18:36 AM  Show Profile  Visit Gerry's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MikeC

The wood is decking on a boat dock. The rust on the wood came from an old lawn chair that didn't get moved out of the rain a few days ago.


The funny thing is, if someone were to model it exactly this way, people would say it looks too orange-y, and next time use chalk rather than Polly Scale.


Gerry (MMR #346)

Country: USA | Posts: 264 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/23/2004 :  09:19:26 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yep, in fact, Gerry, I thought the same thing yesterday while I was taking the photos. Worse yet, I actually do have a chalk stick that's an exact match for the Polly color.... how often do you think it gets used?




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

rrkreitler
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 08/24/2004 :  1:16:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Being that I am new to this forum this response is a bit late.

In regards to the “sock method” for peeling paint ( a couple weeks ago), first I wanted to say thanks to JohnB for posting the tutorial on the sock method. While I had seen it over on the FSM Yahoo forum, the pictures helped a bunch - and the results looked great.

Second, MarcRev pointed out that the results were a little fuzzy from the wood grain lifted by the wire brush. One solution I have found for this is a soft pink pencil eraser. I recommend the large hand held type rather than the small one included on the end of most No. 2 pencils.

I have found that after a couple ink/alcohol washes and one or two oversprays of dullcote, the “fuzz” starts to become brittle. Rubbing the surface with a soft pink eraser will remove a lot of the fuzz. I have found that using this method along with making sure you do not get to overzealous with the brush or razor saw (whatever you are scraping with) you can reduce the amount of fuzz to almost nothing.


Thanks,
Dave K in NB

Country: USA | Posts: 853 Go to Top of Page

n/a
deleted

Posted - 08/25/2004 :  7:12:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
While starting to work on part 2 of the On30 diorama I began experimenting with how to do the weathered/rainwashed bottom edges of siding...I thought the experiment might be of interest, so the photos below, show the test samples (indicating what was used), and the siding on the structure so far...I think I still need to add the floquil.

The method is simply done by weathering the siding as you normaly would, and then dipping a soft brush in the chosen "agent", holding it against the bottom edge and letting it "wick" up the board...if not dark or high enough, just repeat.

Marc






Country: | Posts: 1147 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/25/2004 :  8:37:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Marc, your experiments are interesting. I read your post earlier today about trying Dullcote and alky together on wood, and it gave me some ideas for experiments of my own. But you've saved me some work with your own experiments. What I like about your results is the range of "possibilities" or options when it comes to weathering wood. Those "high water" stains on the board ends look very realistic. Thanks for the photos and the info!






Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

n/a
deleted

Posted - 08/26/2004 :  03:57:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike,

Sorry the pic of the samples was a bit washed out and the pieces small, but it was the best I could out of the bunch. One note on the floquil Grime, this was done in multiple applications of a very thinned wash.

I was thinking of trying a very diluted wash of a beige colored "Guache" paint to wick, instead of the Floquil...but couldn't find my tubes at the time......I thought being water based it might flow and absorb diferently...could mix it with alc instead of H2O..........hmmm.

I'd love to see what your ideas are/result in. Please post pics when you've got them.

Marc



Country: | Posts: 1147 Go to Top of Page

Gerry
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/26/2004 :  10:16:13 AM  Show Profile  Visit Gerry's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Marc -- Excellent stuff!

Two questions: What is "Silverwood" -- a color of craft paint?

Also, when you say "alcohol" are you meaning an India Ink/alcohol stain?


Gerry (MMR #346)

Country: USA | Posts: 264 Go to Top of Page

rrkreitler
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 08/26/2004 :  12:26:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Marc,

This is very cool. I love the dried out look of the water damage. I will have to give this a try.

I attended a clinic a few years ago where a gentleman did a similar technique using Xylene based marking pens. He used a couple different shades of oranges and browns. When the pen is pressed against the end grain of basswood the Xylene will wick a couple inches up the wood if you hold the pen there long enough.

The main difference between his technique and yours is that his looked wet while yours looks dry. He did one of the most beautiful models of a water tank I have ever seen and many of the boards looked like they were wet and starting to suffer some water damage.

I am going to definitely give your method a try. Thanks for sharing!


Thanks,
Dave K in NB

Country: USA | Posts: 853 Go to Top of Page

Rick
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/26/2004 :  1:02:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Marc,

Thanks for posting this information. The results you've achieved look very good. I have the same question that Gerry has about what silverwood is.



Country: USA | Posts: 22746 Go to Top of Page

mikeLV
Crew Chief

Posted - 08/26/2004 :  1:52:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Marc, your weathered bottom edges look great! I'm wondering how noticable it would be in HO scale though. I'll have to give it a try. Its great to see some new ideas.

Mike

Country: USA | Posts: 970 Go to Top of Page

postalkarl
Fireman



Posted - 08/26/2004 :  2:20:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Your weathering looks very nice. I'll have to give it a try.

Karl S.



Country: | Posts: 6922 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/26/2004 :  3:51:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gerry & Rick, a quick answer to your questions and then Marc can fill you in on the details when he sees your questions: Silverwood is an alcohol-based wood stain that was originally made by Builders in Scale. BIS is now owned by CC Crow, and he still has the Silverwood stain available. I have never tried Silverwood myself, so I don't know if the current stain is the same as the "old" BIS stuff that Jim Haggard (BIS's former owner) made. It's available at CC Crow's website.

Okay, Marc, your turn. How is the stain applied? How long does it take to work on the wood? etc., etc.?




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

n/a
deleted

Posted - 08/26/2004 :  8:05:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike,

Thanks for helping with the questions.(the bottle I have is still labeled for BIS)

Gerry, In the samples where it says Alc(ohol, I'm just using straight 99% Isopropyl from my local Rite Aid pharmacy. In samples 1 & 3, I wanted to see if I could acheive that bleached out feeling that old board s get when exposed. I thought this might happen from the alc. reacting with the Dullcoat (as you can see the result was not an overwhelming sucess), where I used it on 2 & 4 I wanted to see if it would cause more "bleaching on the dullcoat, as well as to see if it would "carry" the Silverwood further up the boards...without adding more darkness at the bottom (as can happen when merely adding more S-W).

The reason for trying the Floquil, is because I wanted to see if there was a way to acheive that faded/bleached wood look...but the resuts were so, so. The Floquil "stain" didn't really stain...it more or less deposited pigment in the weathering/grooves....which was an interesting effect all of it's own.

On the photo of the cabin side, there was additional wethering done to this prior to doing the edges.
The samples are merely pieces of stripwood stained with Micro-Mark "Age-It-Easy" (which I'm not fully thrilled about...feels a bit too much like an Analine dye)and SW, or Alc/Shoe-Dye. On the cabin side photo, the pieces have had a bit more wire brush distressing done, and then had a final stain of Dirt & dirty Diosol added. I think the remaining dirt helped create the more distinct top edge when the SW was applied/wicked.

The SW wicking is almost instant, and you can control the amount/darkness by how much/long you apply it. I use soft flat sided brush thats as wide as the boards, dip it in the SW, and then just hold the flat side of the brush against the bottom front edge of the board....you'll see the stuff wick/draw right up the grain...if you want more, just reapply....I blow dry each side/section as I go...that way I can see the final result/color before applying more. So far it appears that theres a limit of how high the wicking goes, probably due to the nature of the wood and the stain....to do it higher (ie. pier pilings and such)one would probably have to dip the piece into a container of the liquid, and then let it wick up from that point.
The wicking action/height also depends on how distresesed/gouged/your boards are, as it does tent to follow up the xacto and wire brush "grooves".

I think it would work well in any scale (well maybe not N), as your wood strips are smaller in HO, so the effect wouldn't be as broad/bold as in O.

Dave, There have recently been discussions on using the AD-Marker pens for staining and weathering wood, on the Yahoo Weathering group. I have never tried it, or seen this done (and I have about a 100 of those pens sitting around)...my biggest concern with those (having used them extensively for rendering) is that they fade over time, and the ink can have a slight sheen to it on some surfaces, which is probably what caused the
wonderful "wet/damp" look that you spoke of. I also feel that the light beiges and greys might appear too "transparent"...but then, like I said I havent tried this....if you do, I'd love to see the results.

Hope this all helps....

Marc



Country: | Posts: 1147 Go to Top of Page

Gerry
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/27/2004 :  12:52:46 AM  Show Profile  Visit Gerry's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Wow, that's quite a comprehensive set of experiments, Marc. Thanks for reporting it all.

(Sounds like you might be in the ad biz, too -- guys with markers are a treasure and a rarity today!)


Gerry (MMR #346)

Country: USA | Posts: 264 Go to Top of Page

n/a
deleted

Posted - 08/27/2004 :  01:48:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just can't seem to part with them...I think half must be dry...I still have some from when they came in the original glass marker bottles. I only had about a year of advertising and graphics in college, doing hand comped type, logos, presesentations, figure indication,storyboards, and copy....then I switched over to product and automotive design....because thats where I got to use the marker ink dirctly from the bottle and you got to use Xylene by the quart(hmmmmmm....memeories...talk about a fuzzy high after an all-nighter of rendering).

Marc



Country: | Posts: 1147 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 26 Previous Topic: Quick Tip #6 and #7 Topic Next Topic: Final pics of FSM JS #18 Westside Auto  
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Previous Page | Next Page
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-19 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.8 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000