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 Weather or not: Discussion, Tips, Techniques
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Author Previous Topic: Mike Chambers Wit and Wisdom Topic Next Topic: Idaho Hotel limited edition construction thread
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visman48
Fireman



Posted - 07/25/2011 :  10:04:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit visman48's Homepage  Click to see visman48's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Guys,
Here are the brushes I use..they are dirt cheap..as in a couple of bucks for a package of

From http://www.dickblick.com/products/blick-economy-white-bristle-stencil-brush/#photos





I havent worn mine out yet...

Les



Country: USA | Posts: 6031 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/26/2011 :  09:45:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Another favorite of mine is a bristle angle shader: http://www.colinharbut.com/art/Princeton-Natural-Bristle-Angle-Bright/brushes/angular/acrylic-oil-brushes/ (You can get these cheaper at Michaels and other craft stores.) This is really good for working stuff into corners.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7835 Go to Top of Page

TearAPin
Section Hand



Posted - 07/26/2011 :  10:20:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the brush info. I will pick those up.


Country: | Posts: 77 Go to Top of Page

kebmo
Fireman



Posted - 07/16/2013 :  10:15:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
was this thread a sticky that came unstuck? great info here. it's a shame to let it get buried.

i know the voices aren't real, but boy do they come up with great ideas...

Country: USA | Posts: 1657 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/22/2013 :  11:33:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi folks,

I'm not sure if this is the place to post my question, but here goes:

I have seen many builds on painting and weathering, and many great results. As an example, I have noticed that some of you achieve a thinned-down look to an older structure, with a topcoat of faded, light green paint. I see light shades of earth and browns through the top coat paint, but am wondering what to use to achieve similar results.
I have stained my clapboard with A & I, then with grime & floquil thinner, per Brett's instructions. Next up, was going to use a thinned wash with floquil earth and thinner, but I am thinking to forget the floquil altogether, as the dried walls will be too flammable with all of the floquil paints and thinner applied. Do I use acrylic washes, or stick with the floquil paints? Any suggestions?

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4167 Go to Top of Page

visman48
Fireman



Posted - 12/22/2013 :  11:41:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit visman48's Homepage  Click to see visman48's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Rich,
Is the effect you are trying to achieve, chipped paint or wood that has color but not the chipped effect? If you have followed Bretts technique and instructions you have set the base for everything to follow, be it mineral spirits and acrylic paint, the hairspray and paint to chipping, or the rock salt rubber cement method, the under color is as critical as the over color.

Les



Country: USA | Posts: 6031 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/22/2013 :  11:45:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by visman48

Rich,
Is the effect you are trying to achieve, chipped paint or wood that has color but not the chipped effect? If you have followed Bretts technique and instructions you have set the base for everything to follow, be it mineral spirits and acrylic paint, the hairspray and paint to chipping, or the rock salt rubber cement method, the under color is as critical as the over color.

Les


Les,
The effect I'm trying for is just faded paint. I guess i will continue to see if it works. Thanks for the reply.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4167 Go to Top of Page

silveradonorthern
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 12/23/2013 :  2:34:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Rich,

You wrote: Next up, was going to use a thinned wash with floquil earth and thinner, but I am thinking to forget the floquil altogether, as the dried walls will be too flammable with all of the floquil paints and thinner applied.

I wouldn't be TOO concerned about flammability as once the solvents dry/evaporate, the wood wouldn't be any more flammable than plain wood. I'm not sure the effect your after (maybe you could post a picture)but I think Pan Pastels might work well for you. They have a four color range (light to dark) called Chromate Oxide Green. Numbers: 660.8 Chromate Oxide Green Tint, 660.5 Chromate Oxide Green, 660.3 Chromate Oxide Green Shade & 660.1 Chromate Oxide Green Extra Dark. I also like 680.3 Bright Yellow Green Shade. I posted some color samples in my "Geoff Nott Memorial" thread. I wasn't trying so much for a faded paint look when I did these samples but I know they could be used as such.

Hope this helps.


Michael

Edited by - silveradonorthern on 12/23/2013 2:56:06 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 663 Go to Top of Page

silveradonorthern
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 12/23/2013 :  2:52:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Rich,
Here is a link to my color samples.

http://www.railroad-line.com/discussion/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=40268&whichpage=2

I forgot to add this to my last post


Michael

Country: USA | Posts: 663 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/23/2013 :  10:06:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Michael,

Thanks for the info on the Pan Pastels. I do have Roger Malakowski's DVD of how he demonstrates the use of the pan pastels, but haven't had a chance to view it yet. Also, after the upcoming Holiday's, my thought is to buy some of them. I would probably have use for the earthy-toned ones more.
I spend quite too much time trying to search for information rather than modeling, so my New Years resolution will be less time on the computer, and more time at the bench.
Thanks, and Merry Christmas to you and yours.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4167 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/19/2014 :  2:29:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This was weathered with Pan Pastels and MIG pigments, mostly light gray and beige, with a bit of darker brown:

I used "Colour Shapers" to get the vertical streaking. These are basically "rubber tipped paint brushes" http://www.colourshaper.com

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7835 Go to Top of Page

LynnB
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/19/2014 :  2:50:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks great.


Country: Canada | Posts: 2365 Go to Top of Page

KCS Trains
New Hire



Posted - 03/16/2014 :  9:19:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm new to the forum, but found a great and inexpensive way to weather track. I found a youtube from Joey Ricard with Trackside Scenery.

1. Spray your track with flat black and let sit overnight.
2. Take acrylic paint (suede or Americana Oyster) and paint the ties.
3. Make a mixture of rust powder and alcohol which is the consistency of spaghetti sauce and paint the rails. It will look like this.



[b]Download Attachment:

4. Don't worry - it doesn't look good, but the next step brings it all together.

5. Take black chalk and a big brush and brush on the black powder liberally. The results are amazing.

[b]Download Attachment:

I hope you enjoy.

Phil



Country: USA | Posts: 10 Go to Top of Page

thayer
Engine Wiper

Posted - 11/11/2015 :  12:30:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
While raking/blowing autumn leaves this afternoon, I noticed a subtle variation within the algae growth on the north wall of our garden shed.

I found it particularly interesting that the nail lines and knots in the pine boards are showing evidence of a natural algaecide or some other resist that is restricting its growth.

While few might attempt to replicate this effect, it does show the value of documenting real life for later reference.




Country: | Posts: 260 Go to Top of Page

Empire of the Air
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/11/2015 :  7:14:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Pine is an "allelopathic" plant, meaning that it produces biochemicals that can inhibit growth in other organisms. Since the algae in the photo is not present around the knots and nailholes, it is likely the result of pine tar(sap) concentrations. Even after kiln drying, pine can contain a lot of sap.

A lot of folks use pine straw as a mulch and wonder why after a few years the mulched plants start to decline. It's for the same reason, the chemicals are found in all parts of the plant.

Regards,
Wallace



Country: USA | Posts: 106 Go to Top of Page
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