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 Weather or not: Discussion, Tips, Techniques
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Author Previous Topic: Quick Tip #6 and #7 Topic Next Topic: Final pics of FSM JS #18 Westside Auto
Page: of 26

wesleybeks
Fireman



Posted - 05/05/2010 :  03:29:58 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great technique Andy

They look great together.



Country: South Africa | Posts: 2829 Go to Top of Page

andykins
Fireman

Posted - 05/05/2010 :  04:39:39 AM  Show Profile  Visit andykins's Homepage  Reply with Quote
thanks guys, in fact rick posted the link to where i saw this technique, have a look, lots of other good ideas for weathering on there


Country: United Kingdom | Posts: 4279 Go to Top of Page

Rick
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/05/2010 :  08:35:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Found this site this morning that has another technique or two for rusting up metal: http://site.scratchmod.com/Techniques.php



Country: USA | Posts: 22742 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 05/05/2010 :  08:40:24 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Rick

Good fine.

Jerry


Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 11404 Go to Top of Page

darrylhuffman
Crew Chief

Posted - 05/06/2010 :  1:27:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit darrylhuffman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
There has been discussion of the type of container to use when staining wood.

I simply pour my stain, shoe dye, into a bottle of alcohol and shake.

The stripwood is then dunked into the bottle, taken out, turned around, and then the other end dunked into the bottle.

Very simple.

If the wood is long, then I break it in half to do the dunking.

Or, if I am doing a bundle of wood, I just use a soft paint brush dipped into the bottle alcohol/shoe dye and flow the stain onto the bundle.

The stained wood is spread out on newspaper to dry.

I remember when I first did this in 1971 that I got carried away with making a "chart" with small pieces of wood stained with fixed amounts of black and brown mixed together in different portions.

Now I just tape a piece of stained wood on the outside of the bottle.

I have tried all kinds of trays and containers over the years and always go back to this nice basic way of doing things.


Darryl Huffman
darrylhuffman@yahoo.com

You can follow my blog here:

http://ghosttownmodels.blogspot.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 722 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/07/2010 :  3:23:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you buy pre-cooked ribs, they tend to come in a relatively long and skinny plastic container. I have one that's about 14" long (full rack) and about 6" wide. This is pretty handy for soaking long (12" or longer) pieces of stripwood. I've used A-West's "Weather-It" a lot, and I'll put the wood into the rib container (after the ribs have been eaten and the container is thoroughly cleaned :-), add "Weather-It" and let the wood soak for a while. Then I remove the wood, setting it on paper towels to dry and pour the "Weather-It" back into the bottle. I remember reading somewhere you shouldn't return "Weather-It", but I've had no problems doing so. This stuff does lose its potency over time (regardless of whether it's fresh or 'recycled')

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7649 Go to Top of Page

lab-dad
Fireman



Posted - 05/07/2010 :  4:01:42 PM  Show Profile  Visit lab-dad's Homepage  Send lab-dad a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I use PVC tube with caps on the ends then sawed in half.
I have 2" and a 1". I made mine 25" long to do full lengths.
-Marty



Country: USA | Posts: 1543 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/07/2010 :  4:10:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I order stripwood from Kappler in 24 inch lengths. The wood comes in bags which are a little bit larger, and of course longer, then the standard bags which most folks are used to seeing their stripwood in.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7124 Go to Top of Page

andykins
Fireman

Posted - 07/21/2011 :  10:39:00 AM  Show Profile  Visit andykins's Homepage  Reply with Quote
found this on youtube, called "weather dippin" by big al mayo, it looks like quite a neat way to speed things up, less if you where doing just one car, but a whole fleet.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBOyvS1hBg8&feature=related



Country: United Kingdom | Posts: 4279 Go to Top of Page

visman48
Fireman



Posted - 07/21/2011 :  10:51:01 AM  Show Profile  Visit visman48's Homepage  Click to see visman48's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
I use plastic bags for small wood lengths, cut off and scrap, and a pvc pipe for longer units. As far as drying I take out groups at different times in the staining process to dry. Also you get a very different look if you can dry your wood in the Sun...that bleached look really comes out well, hard to do in the Winter.

Les



Country: USA | Posts: 6031 Go to Top of Page

TearAPin
Section Hand



Posted - 07/24/2011 :  9:20:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Does anyone have a preferred brush for applying the Bragdon powders? Brand and spec? I have a couple of old paint brushes but they must be too soft for working the powder in. It is not sticking all that well.


Country: | Posts: 77 Go to Top of Page

visman48
Fireman



Posted - 07/24/2011 :  9:38:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit visman48's Homepage  Click to see visman48's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
For powders that are going to be rubbed or scrubbed in I use stencil brushes, the are short and stiff, get them at Michaels or AC Moore type places...you can get them in different sizes.

Les



Country: USA | Posts: 6031 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/24/2011 :  9:57:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Don't use expensive brushes for chalks and weathering powders. The powders are kinda abrasive and they'll wear out brushes pretty quickly. Besides stencil brushes, I have a few well worn out brushes that are short and stiff, and work great for applying chalks.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7649 Go to Top of Page

Chuck Doan
Fireman

Posted - 07/25/2011 :  12:35:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave is right, they chew up brushes. I look for the packets of cheap small soft paintbrushes at a local art store. Tearapin, the surfaces usully need to be flat, not glossy for best adhesion.


Edited by - Chuck Doan on 07/25/2011 12:37:10 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 1559 Go to Top of Page

TearAPin
Section Hand



Posted - 07/25/2011 :  9:56:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I tried the cheap brush thing but they seem to soft. I cut the bristles down which helped a little but not enough. I am working on a flat non-shiny surface. Some of it sticks but not as much as I would think.


Country: | Posts: 77 Go to Top of Page
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