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 Weather or not: Discussion, Tips, Techniques
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Author Previous Topic: Quick Tip #6 and #7 Topic Next Topic: Final pics of FSM JS #18 Westside Auto
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hvig
Crew Chief



Posted - 03/01/2007 :  10:58:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit hvig's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I like the cigar tube idea.

Since then, when cleaning up a bit, I found an old aluminum turkey basting tin. I thought maybe I could fold it up into sections on the bottom so that I could put put 3 or 4 cavities in the bottom for separate colors going at the same time. This time it didn't work, as I had a few pin holes.

Next time I'll try a new one from the grocery store, when I pick up some of those zip lock bags.



Country: USA | Posts: 986 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/02/2007 :  07:21:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Harry, I use some clear plastic trays like this one:


Most of mine came from Q-Tip packages, although I have some from other packaging as well.



Country: USA | Posts: 31220 Go to Top of Page

hvig
Crew Chief



Posted - 03/02/2007 :  4:43:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit hvig's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I thought about using plastic package like that, and yours looks a little better in that it looks like it has a snapping lid.
What I really would like is a waterproof snap on lid.

My wife asked if I wanted anything from the grocery store a few nights back, and I asked her to look in the "disposable glad storage box" section for something about the size of a hot dog bun, maybe thinner.

So far no luck.

My real fear is that while I soak some strip wood, either my 5 year old, 3 year old, or one of the cats will tip the thing over.

Thanks to all of you for all the suggestions. Keep them coming.



Country: USA | Posts: 986 Go to Top of Page

AVRR-PA
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/14/2009 :  6:34:22 PM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi, everyone --

I've been going through all my material on weathering, preparing a clinic for the NMRA Jamboree here in Pittsburgh this coming weekend. I'll be giving people a CD as my handout and it will have "hot links" to all my favorite threads, most of them on rr-line. I hope this will cause some of them to join.

This thread is a great source of information and I wanted to bring it up to the top for the benefit of those who might not have discovered it. I also note that it hasn't been added to since 2007 and I hope people will post new tricks and methods to it.

Don



Country: USA | Posts: 5005 Go to Top of Page

Rusty Stumps
Fireman



Posted - 08/28/2009 :  12:58:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit Rusty Stumps's Homepage  Reply with Quote
This thread needs to be kept near the top all the time. It's a great source of information from great modelers.

Walt

Country: USA | Posts: 7790 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/28/2009 :  4:03:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Rusty Stumps

This thread needs to be kept near the top all the time. It's a great source of information from great modelers.



Walt,
I made it a sticky.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13306 Go to Top of Page

Rick
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/10/2010 :  09:00:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just found this youtube link to some weathering techniques. http://www.youtube.com/user/ScaleModelMedic


Country: USA | Posts: 22747 Go to Top of Page

Peterpools
Engineer



Posted - 02/10/2010 :  10:24:31 AM  Show Profile  Visit Peterpools's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Rick
Thanks for the link. Absolutely a wonderful technique.
Peter



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Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 02/11/2010 :  09:02:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Military modellers have lots of very interesting, ultra realistic weathering techniques. It's a place full of great tips to learn for us.



Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

andykins
Fireman

Posted - 02/15/2010 :  4:33:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit andykins's Homepage  Reply with Quote
thanks for the link! i think i'll be useing that pigment mix to make dry mud on a couple landrovers


Country: United Kingdom | Posts: 4279 Go to Top of Page

kebmo
Fireman



Posted - 03/13/2010 :  09:07:09 AM  Show Profile  Visit kebmo's Homepage  Reply with Quote
i read about a technique in model railroader a couple of years ago and i believe the author called it "unweathering". this is my first attempt at it. i have a small "fleet" of 11 of these ugly yellow peabody coal hoppers and i wanted to make them appear as if they'd been around a long time. i did the entire 'fleet' with varying degrees of weathering and this is the only car i photographed. this is an n scale coal hopper. i didn't go near the couplers because i was concerned with gumming them up with paint, but since then i've learned how to weather the couplers as well [i just haven't gotten around to actually doing it to these hoppers yet.] unweathering requires you to weather the entire object and then remove with an art eraser or some other way, such as wiping with an alcohol soaked q-tip.


the only mystery in life is...why did the kamikaze pilots wear helmets?

Country: USA | Posts: 1561 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/13/2010 :  09:36:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have a nice long plastic tray (about 13" long) that came from a package of frozen ribs. I use that for doing stripwood. Generally, though, I have a glass/Pyrex 'loaf pan' (like you use for banana bread) that I usually use for treating/soaking wood. Since it's impervious to solvents, I also use this for cleaning resin and styrene parts using "Super Clean" (comes in a purple half-gallon jug at Wal-Mart - thanks to Art Griffin for this tip.) This stuff removes even the toughest mold release compounds and has made a big difference in getting paint to stick. When I'm done, I pour the (diluted) "Super Clean" back into a spaghetti jar.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7654 Go to Top of Page

andykins
Fireman

Posted - 05/04/2010 :  07:43:06 AM  Show Profile  Visit andykins's Homepage  Reply with Quote


primer, rust base, rusty shades, leave to dry (3-4 days or so) decant some hair spray, and brush it on all over, leave to dry, brush on top coat (this case yellow) leave to dry, get some water, and brush that on the paint, get a cocktail stick and start poking it, after a while the top coat of yellow will start to shift, showing the rusty colours, carry on till your happy with it, that could be just a couple spots or most the iteam, i then roll (or dab) the iteam with some paper towel to pick up any bits and ive found it lifts any edges that stick down, leave to dry and dull coat, next day, i get some gouache (i use burnt sienna) and use a small brush and put this on some of the spots, i leave for an hour or so then come back with a damp brush and drag it down, this will make streaks, not that there are meny on this drum, but it blended all of the rust, and toned down the yellow


the white drum, front right shows better streaking, as well as how little paint you can remove how i did it.

and for anyone whos worried this takes ages to get right, the yellow one was the 2nd one i did with this technique, and the over all shot shows all ive done so far.



Country: United Kingdom | Posts: 4279 Go to Top of Page

dallas_m
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/04/2010 :  5:43:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Andy --

Nicely done ... and, better still, nice variety in treatment on the various barrels.


Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!

Country: USA | Posts: 4674 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 05/04/2010 :  6:57:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You've done a fine job, Andy. Very convincing!



Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page
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