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Author Previous Topic: Mike Chambers Wit and Wisdom Topic Next Topic: Idaho Hotel limited edition construction thread
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Hume Lumber Co
Engine Wiper



Posted - 03/09/2006 :  10:41:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hume Lumber Co's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I love it you buy something that wants you to look at 35 year old MR! How old are the shingles?

Sorry I am younger than the article and do not have it.

I am sure someone can help.

Matthew



Country: USA | Posts: 413 Go to Top of Page

trainfan 13
New Hire

Posted - 03/09/2006 :  11:13:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
i am sure the shingles are new and in stock.


Country: | Posts: 10 Go to Top of Page

Rick
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/09/2006 :  11:45:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by trainfan 13

i am sure the shingles are new and in stock.



There's a how to at their web site. Here's the link: http://www.sierrascalemodels.com/Roofs.html

Sorry, I don't have that issue of MR.



Country: USA | Posts: 22997 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/15/2006 :  3:26:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Since the last posts to this thread were about shingles, I thought I'd add some photos.

These are of a piece of cedar shake shingle that is 20 years old. (I'm having my roof replaced as a result of wind and hail damage in a big storm several weeks ago.) The photos were taken in direct, early afternoon sunlight. They are offerred here as one more color and texture reference. (The dimpled, green thing in the background is ceramic smoker, which I used to prop up the shingle piece.)

The motley silver-gray, white-gray, and umber colors in the first 3 photos are the result of 20 years of exposure to the elements. The 4th photo shows the unexposed backside of the shingle with its original reddish-brown color.












Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

Chuck Doan
Fireman

Posted - 05/15/2006 :  3:41:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Mike! Very timely as I am considering a shake roof for my barn.

Chuck



Country: USA | Posts: 1560 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/16/2006 :  10:31:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Chuck, as always, I'm amazed at the difference sunlight can make when looking at certain objects. Yesterday afternoon we had a heavy overcast. When I stepped out on my patio and looked at the piece of shingle, the colors were quite different. Instead of the gray shades being the more prominent, the clouded light accentuated the umber tones of the weathered side. It reminded me of the old saw well known to photographers: for the most vivid and accurate colors, shoot Kodachrome on a cloudy day.

The roofers are supposed to come next Monday and start tearing off the roof. I'm going to save a larger piece of old shingle for reference purposes, and I'll photograph it under a variety of lighting conditions to see how the color and texture changes with the different light sources.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

AVRR-PA
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/18/2006 :  7:17:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
A question about leather dye/shoe dye: I know I've seen references to using these dyes instead of india ink for weathering washes. I tried a Google search of RR-Line under both "leather dye" and "shoe dye" and found only 3 mentions. None of them included anything about what proportions to use.

Can anyone point me to a thread or other reference or recommend how much dye to use, and what solvent to mix it with?

Thanks,

Don Reed



Country: USA | Posts: 5005 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/18/2006 :  7:46:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Don,
I use the leather dye all the time and have used the same measurements as for India Ink.
I tsp for a light mix and 2 tsps for a darker mix.
These are mixed with 16 fl oz. of isopropyl alcohol purchased at CVS.
I use the 91% as it has less water and thus will not warp the wood as much.




John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13311 Go to Top of Page

AVRR-PA
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/18/2006 :  8:00:49 PM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks, John -- that's what I needed to get started.

I also prefer the 91% stuff. I've also used the regular denatured alcohol that we use as shellac solvent and for cleaning up epoxy, but that can be a bit dicey and I only use it if I'm too lazy to make a run to the drug store.

I'd use PGA but the state won't let me have it.


Don



Country: USA | Posts: 5005 Go to Top of Page

Tabooma County Rwy
Fireman



Posted - 05/18/2006 :  11:20:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Don and John, just an FYI in case you weren't aware...there is a 99% alcohol available, too. One of my local drug stores carries a few bottles; another said they don't get much demand but can have it ordered in in one day. The 99% stuff really all but eliminates any warping....


Country: USA | Posts: 4630 Go to Top of Page

Hume Lumber Co
Engine Wiper



Posted - 05/18/2006 :  11:42:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hume Lumber Co's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I was wondering if you could post what you stuff looks like with the wood die. I have tried the old sweet & sour (vinegar and steel wool), but it seems to have a different look on boards depending on how I breath on them. This may be okay in some cases, but if I am doing sheeting I doesn’t give the look I want. So I would love to see some pictures of what you guys have.

Matthew



Country: USA | Posts: 413 Go to Top of Page

AVRR-PA
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/19/2006 :  08:28:13 AM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi, Matthew --

I hope John or one of the more experienced guys will field your request for photo's - I'd like to see them, too, and I expect most of my early work with the shoe dye will a lot of "my, doesn't that look interesting (not)" results.

Don



Country: USA | Posts: 5005 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/19/2006 :  08:54:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Al,
Thanks for the tip on the 99% alcohol.
I had trouble finding it in Connecticut but I will give it another try down here in Georgia.

Matthew,
I will stain some siding for you and post a picture.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13311 Go to Top of Page

essodee
Fireman



Posted - 05/19/2006 :  09:14:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi all,

That silvery whitish-gray of Mike's shingle, seems impossible for me to obtain with the A&I and/or shoe dye/A&I combos that I've been brewing up and trying.

Down along the Staten Island waterfront, which is chock full of beached driftwood and timbers of all sorts, the variations of bleached-out wood are incredible, but they are pretty much, uniformly devoid of any kind of color whatsoever, aside from that silvery sheen.

That elusive silvery tone of nature, seems as unobtainable as the alchemist's neverending quest to turn lead into gold.

Stevie O'



Country: USA | Posts: 1561 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/19/2006 :  10:19:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Matthew,

Here are a couple of pictures.
Not real exciting.

The wood is the same piece of NorthEastern scribed siding.
The mix is Kiwi Black Leather Dye mixed with 16 fl oz of 91% Isopropyl alcohol.

The first has 2 teaspoons of the dye.

The natural wood is to the left in the picture.



This is 1 teaspoon of dye mixed the same way.




You can get darker colors by adding more coats.
The wood does not accept the stain uniformly in all areas.
On stripwood it is easier to get a more uniform gray color.

Hope this is what you want to see and if not ask for more pictures.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13311 Go to Top of Page
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