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Author Previous Topic: Quick Tip #6 and #7 Topic Next Topic: Final pics of FSM JS #18 Westside Auto
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MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/17/2005 :  8:32:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Darryl, we have a "New Products Announcement" forum (http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/forum.asp?FORUM_ID=67). Please feel free to post the info about your new CD/DVD in there. I'm sure we have some members here who may not follow this particular thread but might be interested in your clinic video if they see it listed in the other forum.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/17/2005 :  8:40:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Darryl and Mike
I posted the announcement in the New Product Announcement Forum back on Dec 31st when I saw it mentioned on the fsm Yahoo Group.

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=7833



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13306 Go to Top of Page

Mic Greenberg
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/17/2005 :  11:55:06 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mic Greenberg's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi Marc

Three hours, smhee hours. If it takes a month it's worth it. You have achieved the gold standard in modeling with the results of your experimental tank parts. The southward movement of paint to stained board is just beautiful. I can't wait to see the final piece.

Mic


Visit my website:
www.micgreenberg.com

Country: USA | Posts: 152 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/22/2005 :  10:56:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Several days ago, in another thread, someone suggested that when it comes to including nail holes or nail heads on models, many modelers overdo it. This individual felt it was particularly true of those who model more modern structures or structures that would be in active use, rather than abandoned. He may be right, in his opinion, or he may be wrong.

However, here are three photos I took this past Sunday (2/20/05) of a "structure" on my lake property in the Ozarks. It was built just 12 years ago. The wood is treated "5/4ths round" planking, and as can be seen, the nails show very prominently. It's not from a lack of upkeep or maintenance on my part, and the structure sees activity almost every week. Rather, the environment is harsh, and the elements take their toll even on the newest of construction. (And no, it's not my home. I do keep the house painted and looking much nicer. )










Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

Betageek
Section Hand



Posted - 02/22/2005 :  11:07:50 AM  Show Profile  Visit Betageek's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Whew! I was afraid that was some new model construction wood-grain technique that you've come up with over the weekend. You guys are good, but I was wondering what kind of magnifying glasses you were using for this one.

But seriously, I too wonder if people get too carried away with wood detail regarding nails. Consider this same building from the scale distance you would be viewing it as you view your dioramas. I just don't think nails would be that visible from the scale pull-back distance.



Country: USA | Posts: 97 Go to Top of Page

wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 02/22/2005 :  11:46:38 AM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Interesting comments on the nail holes, Mike. Some modelers have the same issue with mortar on brick buildings. They don't paint the mortar since it isn't visible from a distance.

Chuck



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Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/22/2005 :  11:54:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This topic is clearly influenced by personal preference. Since I now regularly do close-up photography of my structures, I prefer to show the mortar between the bricks, and nail holes on some buildings.
Here is a photo of a building where the nail rows were clearly visible form normal viewing distance (where there was still paint on the building).



Country: USA | Posts: 31220 Go to Top of Page

wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 02/22/2005 :  12:25:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I'm with you, Bruce. I like seeing the nail holes and mortar. It provides more visual interest.

Chuck



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Betageek
Section Hand



Posted - 02/22/2005 :  12:56:53 PM  Show Profile  Visit Betageek's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Even with my limited skill-set, I can do passable mortar and I think mortar is quite a bit more noticable from a distance than nails. Having said that, I've applied nails to a building or two myself. I don't think anybody ever notices them unless I point them out (and of course, I make sure to tell them that I actually pushed scale nails into the boards).


Country: USA | Posts: 97 Go to Top of Page

paulbrockatsf
Fireman

Posted - 02/22/2005 :  2:19:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by wvrr

I'm with you, Bruce. I like seeing the nail holes and mortar. It provides more visual interest.

Chuck
I agree whole heartily!

Paul



Country: USA | Posts: 3581 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/22/2005 :  2:34:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If my criteria for adding those details was someone else viewing my models in person and noticing the nail holes, I wouldn't bother simply because no one outside of my immediate family has ever seen my models or layout in person. And it's not likely that anyone ever will, given my wife's preferences and our travel schedule.

So why do I take the time to add nail holes or apply mortar to a brick wall or tediously paint the tiniest details? Because they show up in photographs, and model photography is an important part of the hobby for me. I like the way those details appear in photos. Like Chuck said, they add visual interest.

Bruce, the nails in your photo show up about as clearly at a distance as the nails on my "structure" in the photos above. When I stand on my patio and look at it, I am approximately 50 horizontal feet away and (because of a steep hillside) about 15 feet above it in elevation, so I'm actually looking down on it. I can clearly see the nail holes from that distance. (And in the springtime, I can also see the mildew and algae beginning to form on it and reminding me that it's time to get out the power washer again. )




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

ladrilo2000
Section Hand



Posted - 03/02/2005 :  03:11:05 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike I agree with U , and I'll do them and other details to,that anybody see ,unless I tell them (wife include :) )because there is an personal satisfaction for doing this.I think this concern to the level were U are involucrate in the hobby and no with the skill U can have or not.
And YES the pics are where U see all this tiny details.


Mario

Have a NICE Day

Country: Israel | Posts: 81 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 04/06/2005 :  5:53:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I thought I'd give the sweet/sour method (described on earlier pages in this thread) a try, so yesterday I bought extra fine steel wool (#000) at Sutherlands Lumber and a bottle of vinegar while at the grocery store. I stuffed three of the steel wool pads in a 20 oz jar and filled it almost to the top with vinegar. It started bubbling almost immediately.

Based on the info here and in the original magazine articles from years back, I was prepared to wait several days before tying to use the solution.

However, just for the heck of it, about 90 minutes after I had added the vinegar, I stuck a piece of broken stripwood into the solution and then set it out to dry. I really didn't expect it to change color, and it didn't. But when I went back about 2 hours later, the stripwood had turned a medium red-brown. I was really surprised, so I stuck the other end of the stripwood in the solution and let it dry for about 2 hours. It was even darker. So it seems that you really don't have to wait for several days to use the sweet/sour solution.

Last evening, I dipped another piece of stripwood into the liquid and placed it on top of a plastic bag. This morning the top side of the wood was deep red-brown and the side that had been in contact with the plastic was brown-gray, just as others have reported. So again, I conclude that you don't need to wait a week before using the stuff. I didn't take photos of the stripwood pieces because I wasn't expecting any results and didn't have the camera/lights set up.

This afternoon there is a thick scum of foamy looking rust on the surface. The liquid underneath is still clear, however. I'm going to let the solution sit for a week before separating the rust particles from the vinegar.

As I said, though, I was very surprised that I got results that quickly.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

ANo10
Fireman



Posted - 04/07/2005 :  01:53:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike,

Glad to hear it was a success. I waited the full week on my first batch. I was in a hurry to stain more wood and found out that it doesn't take that long either.

Did you use hydrogen peroxide after the vinegar? H2O2 gives mine a color of reddish brown. I may not be doing something right because after a few days the wood fades to a soft brown. I also found that if I airbrush a light coat of peroxide over the wood after assembly gives all of the wood a uniform color.

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 2773 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 04/07/2005 :  10:30:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jim, I haven't tried the peroxide yet. Actually, when I dunked those pieces in the solution, I was just "messing around" with some pieces of broken and scrap stripwood, not even thinking about experiments. The last piece I put in turned out to be way too red for me. I'd rather have more gray-brown than the deep red-brown I saw yesterday.

I probably should do some actual experiments and keep track of what I'm doing in case I manage to get a color I like and want to replicate it.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page
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