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 Weather or not: Discussion, Tips, Techniques
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Author Previous Topic: Quick Tip #6 and #7 Topic Next Topic: Final pics of FSM JS #18 Westside Auto
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Wally
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/21/2004 :  12:10:05 AM  Show Profile  Visit Wally's Homepage  Send Wally an AOL message  Send Wally an ICQ Message  Click to see Wally's MSN Messenger address  Send Wally a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I'm trying to figure out how to handle the porch and floors in RRC. I glued the Truck shop floor before I decided to do this and the W&B is painted on the base.

If I had to do the TS over I'd do it on thin cardboard. I did the back porch that way but it is so small that it walks with being tacked down. Suggestions..


Wally
It's not my job to run the train, the whistle I can't blow, I'm not allowed to say how fast the train should go,I'm not allowed to blow off steam, nor even ring the bell, but let the gosh darn thing jump the tracks and see who catches...

Country: USA | Posts: 380 Go to Top of Page

n/a
deleted

Posted - 11/21/2004 :  02:09:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Darryl...thanks, I know that works very nicely, as the spacing is always perfect...I was just thinking of trying to do something along the lines of the mattress springs....you know...a bit anal and phsycotic...I only need about 300 scale feet of it.

Wally....though a pain in the rear, when dealing with kits/models, that have cast on details...say bolts and iron work on wooden flat cars that I want to remain iron or rusty...I use the Micromark detail removal tool, and take them off....then paint...and add new (and usually crisper)already painted details, back on.

One of the gus in uour group builds all his buildings so that they are removable from the layout....he leaves the foundation/footings/posts detachable, and adds small brass pins into them at the corners..that then fit into holes in the bottonm edge of the building....this way he can place the foundation/footings/posts on the laout...fully scenic around them so they "set" into the scenery, and then he hust places the buildings on them...using the pins to locate and hold the structure. This really works to hide any unsightly joints between structures and the scenery, or structures and their footings/bases.

Marc



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danpickard
Fireman

Posted - 11/21/2004 :  07:25:44 AM  Show Profile  Visit danpickard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Since my layout base is foam, its easiest just to mount some long pins onto the base of stuctures and push them into the foam base. Scenery is built up around the structure footprint like you said Marc. If anything looks like a "floating" building once mounted on the base, its nothing a few sprinkles of extra groung cover or detail junk cant hide. Im planning on building a few "standard structures", ie with the same size footprint, so they can be interchangable for different exhibitions, or during exhibitions for that matter. Keeps the layout fresh if it can be easily modified.

Dan Pickard


http://www.austnarrowgaugeconvention.com/

Country: Australia | Posts: 1333 Go to Top of Page

lab-dad
Fireman



Posted - 11/22/2004 :  11:55:43 AM  Show Profile  Visit lab-dad's Homepage  Send lab-dad a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I do it like Dan except I have small diameter styrene tubing glued in place.
This way the "pins" dont do any wear & tear on the foam due to repeated in/out.
I also glue some grass & weeds to the bottoms to hide the joint better also.
-Mj



Country: USA | Posts: 1543 Go to Top of Page

n/a
deleted

Posted - 01/17/2005 :  04:55:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am going to call this "What I did with three hours of my life tonight"

While watching Desperate houswives while sitting at my workbench, I started thinking about Slim's stain problem...and it gave me an idea for using stain on my own project. So I started to experiment with the finish/look for the scratchbuilt water tank that will be going on my in progress On30 diorama......here's the result up close...



...and all I did in 3 hours



This is not part of the final project...I did it only as a test for technique...The bands need to be done a bit better(I used brush instead of airbrush on them, so the end result is different)....and I forgot to mask of some areas from the tank paint, to show where the bands were prior to shifting/slipping a bit)...but otherwise, I came away fairly happy with it.

Now if I can only remember how I did it....and how to duplicate it.

Marc



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belg
Fireman



Posted - 01/17/2005 :  06:22:36 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Now Marc you can't just put work like that out there and not tell us how you did it? Pat


Country: USA | Posts: 4503 Go to Top of Page

Mario Rapinett
Fireman



Posted - 01/17/2005 :  06:48:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
[/quote]
The Sweet & Sour solution is vinegar and steel wool.


Hi

Sometime ago I tried the SS solution with no luck. Tried various vinegar brands and steel wool... I gave up... Used the vinegar on me fish & chips, instead.

Might try it again won day...

Thanks for the tread...my first visit here....

Mario

PS..... Finally, good to see Marc in the Flesh, even though it was only the fingers.






Country: Australia | Posts: 5840 Go to Top of Page

Darryl L Huffman
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/17/2005 :  07:01:25 AM  Show Profile  Visit Darryl L Huffman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Mario,

For sweet and sour to work, you must use cheap steel wool. Good quality steel wool will not rust.



Country: USA | Posts: 252 Go to Top of Page

Mario Rapinett
Fireman



Posted - 01/17/2005 :  07:53:05 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
G'day Darryl...... good to see ya on the forum....

I always go for the best....that must have been my mistake for the excercise.

In future I will think "Cheap"

Yep..... I will be extra "cheap" in the future.....



Country: Australia | Posts: 5840 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/17/2005 :  08:02:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Marc,
That is an intersting effect. I will second Pat request for a how-to.



Country: USA | Posts: 31215 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/17/2005 :  09:56:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark, that is a beautiful job of weathering! I hope you can remember the steps. But 3 hours? Yikes!

Just out of curiosity, has anyone tried Mic's "peeling paint" methods for wood or metal yet? I haven't, but the projects I've been working on lately haven't lent themselves to trying either method.






Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

ANo10
Fireman



Posted - 01/17/2005 :  10:10:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark,
I like the weathering on the water tank. I agree with the others on a "how to..".
Thanks for sharing.

Mike,

Mic's sheets came in after I left for the well. I am at a standstill on some white metal detail parts and East End Grocery's. I want to use both of his methods on these parts and structure. I should be going home this week and start on his method by the weekend. I'll post up any results.

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 2773 Go to Top of Page

Darryl L Huffman
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/17/2005 :  5:29:36 PM  Show Profile  Visit Darryl L Huffman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
MikeC

Nash and Greenberg established these weathering techniques in the late 1970s. They still work as well today as they did back then. A standard part of the hobby.



Country: USA | Posts: 252 Go to Top of Page

Darryl L Huffman
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/17/2005 :  5:34:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit Darryl L Huffman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
COMMERCIAL MESSAGE

It appears there are members here who don't belong to the Yahoo weathering group. I have a new 2 hour video clinic on weathering metal and wood which is available on DVD and VHS. Price is $20 plus $5 shipping. If interested, you can find more information at my website at:

http://www.darrylhuffman.50megs.com/custom3.html

Darryl



Country: USA | Posts: 252 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/17/2005 :  6:19:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Darryl L Huffman

MikeC

Nash and Greenberg established these weathering techniques in the late 1970s. They still work as well today as they did back then. A standard part of the hobby.



I know they did, Darryl. I've long been a fan of theirs.

Mic recently rejoined the modeling ranks and has published his methods in a new format which he calls "Tips Sheets." I wrote the reviews for him, and several of our members here have purchased the sheets. I was curious as to whether anyone who bought the sets from him had tried the methods yet.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 26 Previous Topic: Quick Tip #6 and #7 Topic Next Topic: Final pics of FSM JS #18 Westside Auto  
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