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 Weather or not: Discussion, Tips, Techniques
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Author Previous Topic: Quick Tip #6 and #7 Topic Next Topic: Final pics of FSM JS #18 Westside Auto
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wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 09/24/2004 :  3:00:03 PM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Wow, I just want to flick some of that rust off the fuel tank. This is great. Sign me up for a how-to.

Chuck



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belg
Fireman



Posted - 09/25/2004 :  07:14:28 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mic I'm also waiting on the edge of my seat for some how to's. The tank texture reminds me almost of very fine stucco is this a possibility? Has anyone tried that to color over stucco with rust? Pat


Country: USA | Posts: 4503 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/25/2004 :  08:29:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mic,
I also like what I see and wonder if you could elaborate on how you did the boat and cart.
Thanks for the great pictures and the outstanding models.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13306 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/25/2004 :  09:04:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mic, that's fantastic weathering. I'm also interested in a "how to".

George



Country: USA | Posts: 15160 Go to Top of Page

Wallace
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/26/2004 :  12:41:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As an alternative to the use of vinegar/steel wool, try household bleach and steel wool, which provides a very nice "rust" solution rather quickly. When all the steel wool has been converted to rust, add some white glue to the solution; it will help the "rust" adhere to the object. It does quite well on oil drums that can be scattered in the weeds on a layout.


Country: USA | Posts: 372 Go to Top of Page

belg
Fireman



Posted - 09/26/2004 :  07:40:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wallace do you use the same ratio of bleach/steel wool as the sweet and sour? And does it need to be nuetralized after brewing?


Country: USA | Posts: 4503 Go to Top of Page

Mic Greenberg
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/26/2004 :  09:23:56 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mic Greenberg's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Karl S

The flat bed is an O scale model. Acutally except for some experimental modeling quite a few years ago all my modeing is 1/48. It is just large enough for siginificant detailing and just small enough so a diarama only takes a year of so to build. The effects on the fuel tank are the result of a lot of overspraying and chalk dusting. The illusion is both texture and color. I think you need both to portray realistic images for photography. Thanks for the kind words.

Mic


Visit my website:
www.micgreenberg.com

Country: USA | Posts: 152 Go to Top of Page

Mic Greenberg
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/26/2004 :  09:39:19 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mic Greenberg's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Mike

The boat on the cart is a white metal model from one of the marine model companies. It is laminated with HO scale wood that is adhere with Crazy glue. The entire boat is then painted a driftwood color then masked to create a waterline and spray painted with white and green. Rubber cement very judiciously applied (before painting) creates the peeling paint. The dirt and crud near the bow is my barnacle effect made with soupy white glue and real dirt applied like one would add a pinch of salt to a pot of stew. I am a big fan of dirt. Finely sifted it seemed to take the fresh construction edge off my models. When in doubt as to appearance just take the entire model and bath it in dirt. Since I overspray when airbrushing the toothy surface holds the dustyness without any further action. I'm sure this would be tough on rolling stock and motive power but I tend to be more a static modeler. Thanks for all your forum help and the technical assitance on using this site.

Mic


Visit my website:
www.micgreenberg.com

Country: USA | Posts: 152 Go to Top of Page

TrevorCreek
Fireman



Posted - 09/26/2004 :  09:59:08 AM  Show Profile  Click to see TrevorCreek's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Mic,

Thanks for the how-to. Looking forward to more. Are you currently building any dioramas?

Frank Bernard



Country: USA | Posts: 1028 Go to Top of Page

Wallace
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/27/2004 :  02:31:05 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In answer to Belg's question, I do not measure the quantity of bleach, but simply pour enough in the container, (I use a plastic pill container from a pharmacy)to cover the steel wool. Usually, the chemical reaction leaves some of the steel wool un-converted to rust, and more bleach is required. I usually have to pour out some of the liquid before adding the white glue.


Country: USA | Posts: 372 Go to Top of Page

ANo10
Fireman



Posted - 09/27/2004 :  11:37:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm always looking for diffrerent weathering techniques and materials. In the September 2004 issue of Model Railroader, in the "Workshop" section is a letter from a modeler from Canada titled "Tempera Weathering".
(page 30).

To partially quote, "I've found that dry powdered tempera colors work better for weathering than powered pastels, which tend to disappear under a clear finish."

Of course I had to try it. The tempera powder I found at Michaels was about five bucks for 16 ounces. What a deal. So I tried this little experiment.

The tempera is on the left side, powdered chalk pastel on the right. The top spot is mixed with a small amount of water. The bottom two spots are equal amounts of dry tempera powder and chalk applied directly to unfinished wood. All samples were hit with Testor's Dull Kote.


I think I'll stick to my chalks.

Jim




Country: USA | Posts: 2773 Go to Top of Page

lab-dad
Fireman



Posted - 10/08/2004 :  09:13:48 AM  Show Profile  Visit lab-dad's Homepage  Send lab-dad a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
My "sweet & sour" has finally 'cooked' long enough.
I did a test run and am very pleased with the results.
However....its a little dark for me.
Question; How do I thin or reduce the sweet & sour?
I'm assuming just add some ore vinegar?....
Thanks
Marty



Country: USA | Posts: 1543 Go to Top of Page

n/a
deleted

Posted - 10/08/2004 :  3:09:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jim,

Thanks for the info on the Tempra powder. I have never seen this product before (or I just don't recall...but then that seems to be happenning more and more these days)

A couple of years back there was an article in NG&SLG about a fellow that built an incredible dillapidated church, and he used Egg Tempra paint to paint the wood....it looked so good I thought I'd give it a try. I built a quick/small Oregon-American LCo. logging shack to test it on (below are the pics of the result). I didn't find it easy to work with, although it does have possibilities for aged/worn paint if exlpored further. The problem/issue I found with it, that unless sealed, the paint is still active (will disolve/become workable) month's and even a year later....which makes it a bit hard to weather with any type of liquid. Although I like the color, and dull "chalky" look of the paint, I think I will stick to Floquil for now.







Marc



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Gerry
Engine Wiper

Posted - 10/09/2004 :  12:55:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit Gerry's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by lab-dad

My "sweet & sour" has finally 'cooked' long enough.
I did a test run and am very pleased with the results.

Yay!
Was it your original batch, or did you start over?


Gerry (MMR #346)

Country: USA | Posts: 264 Go to Top of Page

belg
Fireman



Posted - 10/09/2004 :  07:21:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Marty I think it would depend on if you still want it to cook more or just thin it to use, if its the later I would probably use alcohol or windshield washer fluid to thin.


Country: USA | Posts: 4503 Go to Top of Page
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