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 Weather or not: Discussion, Tips, Techniques
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Author Previous Topic: Quick Tip #6 and #7 Topic Next Topic: Final pics of FSM JS #18 Westside Auto
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lab-dad
Fireman



Posted - 09/15/2004 :  08:52:59 AM  Show Profile  Visit lab-dad's Homepage  Send lab-dad a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks Dutch.
As I recall the method resulted in a reddish brown side and the normal grey brown color.
Any one else got an idea?
-Marty



Country: USA | Posts: 1543 Go to Top of Page

Gerry
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/15/2004 :  10:21:13 AM  Show Profile  Visit Gerry's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by lab-dad

reddish brown side and the normal grey brown color. Any one else got an idea?



As I recall reading about the technique (I've never tried it), you put the "sweet and sour" solution on both sides of the stripwood, then lay the stripwood down on Saran Wrap (ok... "plastic wrap") and let it dry.

The chemistry is such that the oxygen turns the exposed wood rust/red, and lack of oxygen turns the plastic wrap side gray (the steel wool color).


Gerry (MMR #346)

Country: USA | Posts: 264 Go to Top of Page

lab-dad
Fireman



Posted - 09/15/2004 :  12:05:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit lab-dad's Homepage  Send lab-dad a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Okay! now were working!
Um er what is "sweet & sour" solution?
Do I need to order chinese tonight?....
Mj



Country: USA | Posts: 1543 Go to Top of Page

Gerry
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/15/2004 :  12:37:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit Gerry's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by lab-dad

Um er what is "sweet & sour" solution?
Do I need to order chinese tonight?....
Mj


Confusion say, "Man who buy stripwood is a little board."
Ok, well...

The Sweet & Sour solution is vinegar and steel wool. I'm not sure of the exact proportions because I don't know that there ARE any. Basically you put some vinegar in a small bottle, and add some torn-up pieces of steel wool -- the finer the wool and the smaller the pieces the better. I'd say the volume of steel wool should equal half of the volume of the vinegar, but that's my guesstimate.

Then wait about a week or two for the acid in the vinegar to completely dissolve the steel wool. When you're done the solution you have is "Sweet and Sour."

Then you paint it on (or dunk) the stripwood, set it on Saran Wrap and let it dry.

I've made the Sweet and Sour solution and I love how it simulates rust... because it is. But I've not tried the Saran Wrap thing.


Gerry (MMR #346)

Country: USA | Posts: 264 Go to Top of Page

lab-dad
Fireman



Posted - 09/15/2004 :  2:01:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit lab-dad's Homepage  Send lab-dad a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Kool, Thanks!
Off to Home depo & Publix!
and maybe an order of pork fried rice :)..........
Mj



Country: USA | Posts: 1543 Go to Top of Page

belg
Fireman



Posted - 09/15/2004 :  5:21:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gerry I believe that this was the concoction that should not be covered right so the gas does not build up in the jar and explode?? Pat


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Gerry
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/15/2004 :  5:29:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit Gerry's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by belg

Gerry I believe that this was the concoction that should not be covered right so the gas does not build up in the jar and explode?? Pat


Exactly right. Don't cap it too tightly.

The other thing: watch what kind of vessel you put it in. I used a Starbucks Frappuccino bottle and the stuff eventually ate through the metal cap.

One of the great things (I think) about this concoction is that eventually it settles out and the rust sludge at the very bottom is great for applying with a toothpick to create three-dimensional rust "bubbles" and lumps.


Gerry (MMR #346)

Country: USA | Posts: 264 Go to Top of Page

lab-dad
Fireman



Posted - 09/23/2004 :  1:10:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit lab-dad's Homepage  Send lab-dad a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Okay my Sweet & Sour has been "cooking" for 9 days now.
I been giving it a shake daily.
Is it safe to assume( there's that word) that its ready?
There is still a big hunk of steel wool.
The mix is a cloudy grey(with some rust color).
I left the lid off for day to accelerate the rusting.......?........
The longer I wait, the darker the stain? will it continue to become thicker?
Once the wool is disolved is that it?
Please let me know.
Thanks,
Marty



Edited by - lab-dad on 09/23/2004 2:52:50 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 1543 Go to Top of Page

Gerry
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/23/2004 :  2:01:32 PM  Show Profile  Visit Gerry's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hmmmm... this doesn't sound right to me (Chuck -- aka WVRR had this same thing happen) but I would try it on a test piece anyway -- maybe it'll work.

I'm hesitating because my concoction turned rust orange after only a few days.

Maybe your steel wool isn't really true steel?

Does anyone else know what could be going wrong... if it IS going wrong?


Gerry (MMR #346)

Country: USA | Posts: 264 Go to Top of Page

n/a
deleted

Posted - 09/23/2004 :  4:42:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Marty,

I had this happen when I was making rust for my weathering, and couldn't figure out why. I finally came to the conclusion that the wool must be some kind of low grade stainless steel...even though nothing noted on the package. (An interesting side note is that when I threw/added in a piece of rebar...the rebar started making rust like there was no tommorow).

I have also seen something sim (sludgy sweet-and-sour)happen to a friend who used steel wool that had been treated with oil (I think this is done to keep the wool from rusting in the bag over time from air exposure).

Just my guesses.

Marc



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Karl Osolinski
Fireman



Posted - 09/23/2004 :  5:42:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


Hello all,

The "sweet and sour" weathering method was actually invented by Wayne Hume of Vintage Reproductions and written up in an article in Railroad Model Craftsman, January,1986, authored by Dwayne Easterling and Jim Wild.

To one pint of regular white household vinegar (5% acidity) put in one piece of #0000 steel wool (does not say to rip it up, but I did when I made it) cap it very loosely and let it sit for three to seven days. Mine took a lot longer - well over 2 weeks.

The article is filled with great ideas on using the mix. One that I use is dip my pounce wheel into it and then make your nailheads - you get a great rusty looking nailhead.

Anyway, it is quite a long article and even has an explanation of the chemistry that makes it work written by the great Wayne Wesolowski.

Karl Osolinski
Berkley, MI



Country: | Posts: 1971 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/24/2004 :  10:54:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Moderator's Note: The following photos and text are from Mic Greenberg. He is still having trouble accessing the forum and posting photos, so he asked me to post these for him.


Here are some photos for discussion. They mostly represent rust and dust more than anything. The 200 gallon fuel tank uses the Berkshire Valley kit as the basis with a wooden cradle instead of a metal frame.





The flatbed trailer has been around awhile and has been the planned platform for a Grandt Line ‘out of commission’ Porter.



The ‘boat cart’ is a nice little project with some interesting challenges, including brass strip stock shapes with brass pins soldered for strength. The boat on the cart uses HO stock 1 x 4s in 0 scale to laminate the hull, because nothing says wood like wood. The wheels on the cart are from Brommer belt pulleys.



Speaking of Brommer here also is an interesting load. The
Brommer Drill Press in near abandoned form.





Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

TrevorCreek
Fireman



Posted - 09/24/2004 :  1:32:21 PM  Show Profile  Click to see TrevorCreek's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Mike,

Thanks for posting the pics. Mic, as usual your stuff is outstanding. Looking forward to more pics. Mic, how about some how-to's on these great models?

Frank Bernard



Country: USA | Posts: 1028 Go to Top of Page

postalkarl
Fireman



Posted - 09/24/2004 :  2:16:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mic:

Very nice models. I especially like the flat bed and the drill press. Rust job on the fuel tank is great. How did you do it? What scale is the flatbed? Is it O or HO. Would love to see more of your work.

Karl S



Country: | Posts: 6922 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/24/2004 :  2:26:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mic, the weathering on all of these models is absolutely superb! But I'm especially taken with the "boat cart." How did you add the texture and color to the wood on the cart?




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page
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