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Author Previous Topic: looking for builder of Fast Track turnout Topic Next Topic: Layout Lighting
Page: of 13

George D
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Posted - 07/29/2020 :  2:17:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good point, James. I'll take a look at that.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16372 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 07/29/2020 :  6:28:14 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Interesting way to attach ties. Filed for use on the HOn30 quarry line.

Bernd


WWG1WGA

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BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/29/2020 :  6:53:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks good, calibrated eyeballs are working very well. Hope the Barge cement works better than the Pliobond I tried over here.

Jim


Take the red pill

Country: USA | Posts: 5827 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 07/29/2020 :  7:14:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
George, it looks great even though it's unfinished!


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George D
Moderator

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Posted - 07/29/2020 :  7:31:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bernd, I used this technique on the club layout about 15 years ago on guard rails on a bridge. The bridge had an arc, transitioning from a grade to level, so the rails are under stress to pop up and become straight. So far it's holding. I used Pliobond for that.

Jim, Thanks. I read somewhere that Barge Cement is better, so I used it.

Thanks, Carl. A Looong way from being finished.

Georgr



Country: USA | Posts: 16372 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 07/30/2020 :  08:54:45 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote

George, your meticulous construction methods are paying off. The trackwork looks beautiful.


Frank

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George D
Moderator

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Posted - 07/30/2020 :  10:24:30 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Frank.

George



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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/30/2020 :  9:23:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've taken a minor detour. James van Bokkelen (jvbv) suggested that both the wood ties and the PCB ties should support the rails. The PCB ties are 0.037 high and the wood ties are 0.080 high. A rather obvious observation, which I completely overlooked. I figure a piece of 0.040" styrene and the glue will fill the space nicely.

This gave me an opportunity to use my Cricut cutter for this project, I made a set of drawings for the shims which are the same size as the PCB ties, loaded them into the Cricut and cut them from a sheet of 0.040 styrene.



Cricut doesn't cut all the way through 0.040 styrene. I had the machine scribe all the cut lines and then I used the standard styrene scribe and cut procedure to do the task. The advantage of the Cricut is that it scribed a sheet in about 10 minutes and it was extremely accurate. A few years ago I bought a hand seamer from Harbor Freight. I wanted something for snapping long small pieces of styrene. This was the perfect tool for this job. By the way, if you are thinking about buying one, take a good look at their stock, not all the jaws line up properly. Pick one that looks good.



I made two sets of ties (two different cuts). One of standard length ties and one of long strips that could be cut to length for the many turnout tie lengths.



Now to start gluing them to the bottom of the PCB ties.

George



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jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/31/2020 :  08:00:28 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
One other thing about contact cement holding rail to ties: If the layout is subject to temperature swings, you might want to come back to it after it's running well and back the glue up with spikes every 8th or 12th tie. My experience has been that as rail shifts, it will eventually start to break the glue bond, particularly at high temperatures.


Edited by - jbvb on 07/31/2020 08:01:45 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 6582 Go to Top of Page

George D
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Posted - 07/31/2020 :  09:09:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James, I'll be keeping a close eye on it. I'm familiar with rail expansion from experiences at the train club. I'm planning to cut a gap in one of the rails to allow for expansion once it's all fastened down.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16372 Go to Top of Page

wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 07/31/2020 :  09:32:41 AM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Interesting tool, George. And a nice solution. I will have to keep this tool in mind the next time I visit Harbor Freight.

Chuck



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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/31/2020 :  11:58:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Rick. It's a handy tool that I've used on several styrene projects.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16372 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/14/2020 :  09:54:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's been a while since I've posted an update. I've glued all the styrene shims under the PCB ties. I then cut up a 1/8 sheet of cork for the roadbed and fastened it down with DAP adhesive.



I used the same adhesive to fasten the track to the cork roadbed. I've given the track a little nudge and it's very secure.





The adhesive takes paint, so all that white will disappear.

When I applied Barge Cement to the bottom side of the rails to hold the wood ties, I didn't apply it to the stock rails adjacent to the moving point rails. I didn't want to take the chance of any glue getting on the point rails when it was heated. My next step is to cut and glue wooden ties in these gaps. I'll be gluing them to the cork, not the rails.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16372 Go to Top of Page

quarryman
Fireman



Posted - 08/15/2020 :  05:40:43 AM  Show Profile  Visit quarryman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
George-

I was thinking that you would spike the rail down to the wooden ties. Then you could go around and unsolder the PCB ties from the rail, pushing each one down and sliding it out, then slide a wooden tie in to replace it and spike it in place. What you came up with is new to me. I guess I never considered glueing track down because my layout is in an outbuilding. Not only temperature but also humidity rise and fall over the course of the year, affecting both the rail and the roadbed.

Thanks for posting the updates,

Mark Chase
Richmond VA



Country: USA | Posts: 1206 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/15/2020 :  08:02:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark, I've read about using the adhesive in several places. It has a slight flexibility, I don't know if it's enough for the large swings in temperature you're dealing with.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16372 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 13 Previous Topic: looking for builder of Fast Track turnout Topic Next Topic: Layout Lighting  
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