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Author Previous Topic: looking for builder of Fast Track turnout Topic Next Topic: Layout Lighting
Page: of 13

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 06/30/2020 :  1:40:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow George, you're not wasting any time!


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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/30/2020 :  2:57:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Louis.

Carl, that's about a week's work. I'm slow in documenting what I'm doing.

George



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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/01/2020 :  12:20:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When I build a switch, the first thing I do is work on the stock rails. I file the notch on the inside edge where the point rail will meet the stock rail. I use hand files for all shaping. On my earlier attempts, I used a Harbor Freight vertical belt sander, but it's only good for the initial rough cut and it sprays metal shavings all over. I found it doesn't take much longer to do it all by hand and I have complete control of what I'm doing.

I use a block of wood with grooves sawed in it to hold the rail while I'm filing. Not an original idea, but I don't remember where I learned about it.



I've made a tool for curving rail. I picked up the design on the internet several years ago, but I don't remember where. The rollers are for shower doors. I bought them at Home Depot.
The yellow pieces are 0.040Ē styrene spacers to bring the rail up to the same level as the rollers. Getting a nice curve in the rail really helps in making a turnout.



Once the stock rails are filed and curved, they are soldered to the ties by aligning them over the track diagram. I hold the rails in place with wooden tabs screwed to the wood base.



The most important thing I've learned about soldering over the years is finding a way to hold the pieces to be soldered. If you can secure it, you can solder it.

Once the two stock rails are soldered in place I start building the frog. I start with one of the frog point rails. I locate it so the point is an equal distance from the two stock rails and in gauge with the two stock rails. The point must be in gauge at the red lines.



The second half of the frog point is shaped and soldered in place. It actually sits slightly back from the point of the first rail. A little solder is used to fill the bap between the two pieces of rail.



The frog's guard rails are next and a little tricky to bend at the correct angle and get aligned properly. Some people make the the turnout's point rails and these guard rails in one piece and after soldering in place, cut the gap. I find it much easier to make it two separate pieces.



The completed frog.



I cut and filed two pieces of rail for the point rails and soldered them in place. The hinge point for the point rails is at the red arrow. There's a lot of discussion on the internet about flexible hinge points and solid ones, as well as soldered throw bars or ones with flexible attachments. In the past I played with different hinges and throw bar attachments. I'm now going with soldered rails and throw bars because they're much easier to make. I figure there's enough flexibility in code 70 rail to not be a problem. The points move freely from one side to the other.



It doesn't show in the picture, but there are gaps between the frog and the point rails. The frogs will be powered so short wheelbase locos can run on the layout.

Those holes you see all over the place and holes I drill when I need a wood tab to hold rail down for soldering.

Here's where I am now. Two turnouts to go.



George



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Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/02/2020 :  07:19:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
While I'd rather do my own root canals that hand lay track it looks like you are doing an outstanding job George.


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TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 07/02/2020 :  08:17:14 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That is impressive. Great tutorial.

Would I try that nope I'd never have the patience.

But you certainly have it mastered.


Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 12860 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/02/2020 :  08:58:43 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
You sure know what youíre doing, George. Itís a beautiful piece of trackwork.

Mike



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tloc
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/02/2020 :  09:12:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
George, very impressive. Thanks for showing the steps you take. Have fun.

TomO



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Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 07/02/2020 :  09:26:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice work George!
The filing and curving jigs are great ideas.

What wattage/temperature soldering iron are you using?



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Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/02/2020 :  10:17:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow, George, it looks really well done. I think if I tried this, there would be many derailments !!

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4644 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/02/2020 :  11:19:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Tyson Rayles

While I'd rather do my own root canals that hand lay track it looks like you are doing an outstanding job George.



Thanks, Mike, but aren't you being a little dramatic?

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16372 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/02/2020 :  11:20:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by TRAINS1941

That is impressive. Great tutorial.

Would I try that nope I'd never have the patience.

But you certainly have it mastered.



Thanks, Jerry. Patience is not my strong point, but I'm having fun, so patience isn't a factor.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16372 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/02/2020 :  11:22:00 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

You sure know what youíre doing, George. Itís a beautiful piece of trackwork.

Mike



Thanks, Mike. I'm still learning, but each turnout is easier (less mistakes).

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16372 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/02/2020 :  11:23:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tloc

George, very impressive. Thanks for showing the steps you take. Have fun.

TomO



Thanks, Tom. So far this has been a fun project.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16372 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/02/2020 :  11:23:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tloc

George, very impressive. Thanks for showing the steps you take. Have fun.

TomO



Thanks, Tom. So far this has been a fun project.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16372 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/02/2020 :  11:25:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Carl B

Nice work George!
The filing and curving jigs are great ideas.

What wattage/temperature soldering iron are you using?



Thanks, Carl. Those jigs sure do make things easier. The soldering station is a Weller WE551. The data plate says it's a 60 watt unit and I'm using the highest setting, so I assume it's 60 watts. It heats fast.



George



Country: USA | Posts: 16372 Go to Top of Page
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