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 28' boxcar project
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Author Previous Topic: Opinion on this font? Topic Next Topic: Early cabooses from Canadian Pacifics pioneer era
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SAFN SAAP
Engine Wiper

Premium Member


Posted - 11/18/2019 :  02:38:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by deemery

The NESL siding isn't quite long enough to cover the entire side, so I have to splice in a piece in the middle, where it will mostly be hidden by the door.


dave




Dave,

I would like to make a suggestion to you. You were correct in that the NESL 3 1/2" width was short, but you only needed to use two pieces of wood, not the three. This can be used for future builds.

1. Measure the height of the end of the car at the peak of the roof, or highest curve. Add 1/4" to that.
2. Take that measurement and cut the piece from the stock.
3. Measure the cut piece to a little more than half point of the length of the car. Mark it.
4. Now take the width of your car, and measure that with spare wood on either side.
5. Cut where the mark is, making sure it is square.
6. Place the smaller section off to the side. This is the end sheathing for one side of your car.
7. Take the siding section, and measure it for the height of the car. Check and double check. CUT

Doing it this way gives you 1/2 side and 1 end of a car. Two cuts give you one whole side and two ends. Repeat the process and you can have ends for another car already, or use that scrap for cutting out boxcar doors.


The more joints you have in the side walls, the greater chance you have of bowing and the seam coming apart. Having one split, covered by a boxcar door for extra strength is great.

What I do on my sheathing, is that when I know the pieces are right, I will join them together to make one piece and glue them on together.

Take a ruler, and flip the pieces over so that the raw wood is showing. Make sure your butt joints are square and mesh perfectly before doing this. Once they are squared against the ruler, take smaller rectangular pieces of the 1/32 or a little thicker wood, and create a butt joint by putting them parallel to the length of the sides. You want the grain of the butt joint pieces to be opposite of the grain of the sides. So side grain runs N/S, and the butt joint piece runs E/W. Make it big enough to make a strong joint, but not so big that it interferes with placing it on the car side.

Now here is the key. DO NOT USE WOOD GLUE. It contains a little bit of water and will cause the siding to curve. You don't want that. Use a drop of ACC glue. Place two drops, one on either side of the joint. Make sure you hold the joint tightly together. Drop the butt joint on the glue and then press down for 5-10 seconds. You will have an instant joint and you will not be able to see the joint at all, and since it is reinforced from the back, you never have to worry about a split or swelling. It really works.

Just thought I'd pass along this tip to help you save in material. Having three splits is tough. Hats off to you for doing it.

Levi



Country: USA | Posts: 431 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 11/18/2019 :  08:34:38 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Great looking cars Dave and Levi. They are an inspiration to do some myself.

Reminds me of an article back in the late 60's, IIRC, in Model Railroader called "Freight Cars by the Half Dozen"

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 3372 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/18/2019 :  09:07:30 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Levi, I see your point. But here's why I decided to do it the way I did (and I'm happy to have this discussion/debate.) (1) Since I'm doing a bunch of cars all the same size, the extra piece of siding will contribute the middle filler for 4 or 5 cars, so not much waste. (2) The siding height for the ends is taller than for the sides. I'd rather do a bunch of cuts at side height (one cross-cut each), than to cut off the end, then have to go back and cut down the remaining pieces to fit on the side. Again, doing a bunch of cars, I get multiple ends from the end-height pieces.

In either event, though, the joints are mostly hidden behind the door. The only real issue is when the thickness of the siding isn't uniform, which was obvious on my first car. Now I'm a bit more careful to match the thicknesses.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7948 Go to Top of Page

SAFN SAAP
Engine Wiper

Premium Member


Posted - 11/18/2019 :  12:02:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by deemery

Levi, I see your point. But here's why I decided to do it the way I did (and I'm happy to have this discussion/debate.) (1) Since I'm doing a bunch of cars all the same size, the extra piece of siding will contribute the middle filler for 4 or 5 cars, so not much waste. (2) The siding height for the ends is taller than for the sides. I'd rather do a bunch of cuts at side height (one cross-cut each), than to cut off the end, then have to go back and cut down the remaining pieces to fit on the side. Again, doing a bunch of cars, I get multiple ends from the end-height pieces.

In either event, though, the joints are mostly hidden behind the door. The only real issue is when the thickness of the siding isn't uniform, which was obvious on my first car. Now I'm a bit more careful to match the thicknesses.

dave



No problem Dave. I fully understand. I was just throwing that out there as it has worked nicely for me with almost zero scraps.

Yes, I too got caught on the thickness issue. One of my 50' Polar Wave Cars was ruined because I didn't catch that the siding looks awful. Not acceptable. So I am starting over with it. I'm not sure if it is a quality control issue or just a miss, but I've noticed on several sheets of my .040 siding that one end is thicker than the other. It gently tapers. Just a one off. I'm not worried.

Keep on building!

Levi




Country: USA | Posts: 431 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 11/18/2019 :  3:32:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
One of the thing I like about Evergreen car siding is that the grooves go across the sheet, not lengthwise. So, no splicing necessary.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 5564 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/20/2019 :  6:18:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Roofwalks, or at least roofwalk supports, are among the more annoying aspects of boxcar construction. Here's how I'm doing it.

I cut 1/16 x 3/32 into 18 scale inch strips. Then I make a slight cut in the middle of each of these strips. These get glued proportionally spaced to the roof.


Then I use my 'paint paddle sanding stick' to sand them flush parallel to the ground.

I also use these to sand the subwalls/subfloor/subroof smooth, as well as to sand down the side scribed siding to the roofline.

Finally, I glue down the roofwalk itself.


dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7948 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 11/20/2019 :  6:39:55 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Iím with you on the roof walks. Most annoying. Your approach is a good one.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 5564 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 11/20/2019 :  6:57:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Iím with you on the roof walks. Most annoying. Your approach is a good one.

Mike



What Mike said!

Pete
in Michigan




Country: USA | Posts: 6881 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 11/21/2019 :  1:37:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I use a similar approach to my roof walk. The biggest difference being that I flip the car over and let it rest on the walkway as the glue dries. The car is really looking good.

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5326 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/21/2019 :  7:35:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
First car is fully assembled.

It needs paint touch-up, decals (but first I'll have to get some private road decals) and then weathering.

Same car, next to a 34' reefer


Turns out #3 and #4 are about a foot longer (mis-measured something). That's OK, I'll make those two a second series, and probably do a more conventional roof treatment on them.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7948 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 11/21/2019 :  7:52:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
These look good to me, Dave!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 6881 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 11/21/2019 :  8:17:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice, Dave.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 15323 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/22/2019 :  2:54:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great looking car and wonderful tutorial. Thanks for sharing. Got a few good tips also. Ya gotta like the paint paddle sanding stick tip. Today I'm going to break out a new paint paddle/stick, a couple of grits of sand paper and some contact cement to make a longer sanding stick to have on hand ready to go when needed.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7212 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/22/2019 :  6:59:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Car #3, a more conventional roof. It'll get different door hardware, too, representing a slightly newer car or different manufacturer. Car #4 will match this one.


dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7948 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 11/23/2019 :  08:25:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave I like your slight variations among the boxcars. Lends history to the RR.


Country: USA | Posts: 2746 Go to Top of Page
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