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Author Previous Topic: Opinion on this font? Topic Next Topic: Early cabooses from Canadian Pacifics pioneer era
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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/03/2019 :  12:12:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
(I accidentally started this over at HOn3/n30 forum, but deleted it there.)

Since 28' boxcars were the standard pretty much through the 1880s, the SL&N will need a bunch of them. So I did a sketch design and then built a prototype, using the blocks of wood subwall and ends approach of the old wood LaBelle, YOHP, etc. kits. I cut 4"x1/4" pine boards into the appropriate width on my chop saw, then cut the subfloor and end blocks to the right size on the modeler's table saw. I used Mt Albert 1/16" scribed siding, and NESL angled 'subroof' stock. Wood coloring was (a) HunterLine Driftwood, (b) Burnt Umber Pan Pastel (c) black Pan Pastel (lightly applied.) For the roof, I wanted to simulate painted canvas. Somewhere I have some old telephone book pages, but I couldn't find them and used masking tape, instead. That was painted neutral grey and then weathered with Pan Pastels.

Some lessons learned for the remaining cars: (1) 1/16 is -too thick- for car siding. So I ordered some NESL 1/32 sheets. (2) Depending on the width of the car, I might have to rip a bit off the sides of the NESL subroof pieces. That's easy on my modeler's table saw. (3) I need to remember to add weights and truss rods BEFORE I glue the car sides in place. (4) I constructed a jig for drilling the truss rod ends (not added yet) and used a BLMA jig for the grabirons. (5) The Tichy old time car parts sprue has some good stuff on it, but the door hangers (with the arrow top) have that annoying blob on the back so they can't be glued flush. I was able to cut & sand that off, but it's not easy.

The big decision going forward for production will be whether I do any kind of undercarriage, or go with the solid block. I could recess the block a bit and do an undercarriage, but that adds complexity for construction and I'm not sure it'll be visible in every day operation.

This car will be an old car repurposed for yard storage, so I won't have to worry about trying to do truss rods or weight. Hence the heavy weathering





I spraypainted grabirons (with Floquil Grimy Black, that stuff is a joy to push through the airbrush), and will add those tomorrow, along with a brake platform (but no brakestaff since this is a 'grounded car'.) Then final weathering.

dave

Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7948

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 11/03/2019 :  4:50:49 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Excellent start to a fleet of cars.

Iíve never quite figured out those Tichy arrow-shaped parts. Like you, I assume they represent door hardware but Iíve never spotted anything quite like them in drawings or photos.

I think itís a good idea to cut down the NESL subroof to get it to an 1880ís width.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 5564 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 11/03/2019 :  5:02:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave,

I agree with Mike... you're off to a good start here.

If you're running out of phone books, look in your mailbox. Over the next couple of months you'll probably be inundated with various financial reports, all on newsprint, all bound, all a drag to haul to the recycling center, and all of them useful sources of pads for various hobby purposes. When you're done with a project or a page, rip it out and you have a clean sheet. If the financial stuff isn't arriving, that's OK... Medicare runs down the same tracks.

Keep going!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 6881 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 11/03/2019 :  5:37:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I agree too Dave. Nice start on the fleet. Pete makes a good point too about those Financial reports being good for something.

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5326 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/04/2019 :  09:58:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Another note: The door stock is 1/32 wood scribed sheeting. But the depth of those Tichy door guides (along the bottom) is a bit less than 1/32, so they don't quite sit properly. I need to ponder that a bit, I could sand down the door pieces (not a big deal), or I could do those in styrene (with the challenge of making the styrene look like wood.)

(And if you look carefully, the pieces I added to each side of the door for the hangers would definitely be -too thick- to pass through the door guides.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 11/04/2019 09:59:25 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7948 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/04/2019 :  12:43:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, I'm very appreciative of this thread as I also need to build a few box cars. I have been wanting to do those cars board-by-board, so your input on wood sizes is really helpful, as are some of the other tricks like a jig for the truss rod ends. I was a bit surprised by the use of the Black pan pastel as I expected to see the use of a dark gray shade. Keep it coming.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7212 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/04/2019 :  6:48:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by hon3_rr

... I was a bit surprised by the use of the Black pan pastel as I expected to see the use of a dark gray shade. Keep it coming.



Well (1) that's what was on the sponge when I started weathering, and decided it looked good. (2) I used a very light touch. (I use cheap makeup wedge sponges to apply Pan Pastels.) I will probably go back over with black a bit more heavily working up from the very bottom the car for maybe 1 scale foot, to simulate the mildew and staining you see at the bottom of a wood building sitting on the ground.

Also, once I get my order from NESL, I'll update my construction sketch and post it.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7948 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/07/2019 :  6:41:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My Northeastern order arrived today, so as promised here's a sketch of the car construction. The car frame is 1/4" wood (I need to double-check the actual thickness). I'm using 1/32" thick scribed wood for sides and ends, and NESL 'inner roof' stock. I'll have to rip .09 off of each side to get this stock to completely fit within the width of the car. The NESL siding is 3.5" wide, so I'll have to splice pieces to cover the full length of the car side.

As currently designed, car is scale 27' 8" long, 8' 8" wide and 7' 10" tall.

Hope you can read this OK. I can't post it directly here because it's too big. http://www.earlyrail.org/car-sketch.jpg

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 11/07/2019 6:56:40 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7948 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/08/2019 :  9:02:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's the first production build. I cut the subwall pieces on my mitre saw.


Then I cut the end blocks based on the thickness of the subfloor. I marked and drilled (using a jig) holes for the truss rods, and also marked the location of the needle beams.




I ripped down the roof block, turns out that's a bit tricker than I thought. I'll capture the setup for that next time, since I actually have to set up the fence 2 different ways to get the cut off of each side of the subwall.

Finally, I l glued bolsters and needle beams in place. I used epoxy for the bolsters, and also to hold the queenposts to the needle beams.


Tomorrow I'll do the truss rods and weights, and then the car siding.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7948 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/09/2019 :  01:50:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
tx Dave.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7212 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 11/09/2019 :  09:27:32 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Looking good.

My impression from looking at equipment registers is that New England railroads had proportionally more 28í cars rostered than railroads in other parts of the country. Your cars will be most appropriate.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 5564 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/09/2019 :  7:48:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
3x 1/2 oz weights added.

Less than NMRA standard, but 4-4-0 don't pull all that well...

Truss rods, ends and siding added.


The NESL siding isn't quite long enough to cover the entire side, so I have to splice in a piece in the middle, where it will mostly be hidden by the door.


Coupler height checks out. The trucks are the "Cleveland pattern" short wheelbase trucks by Panamint on Shapeways. Next step is to paint the car sides and ends. I did the jigs for truss rod ends and grabirons, which I'll drill after painting.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 11/09/2019 7:53:57 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7948 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/11/2019 :  10:09:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have to rip about .04 off each side of the subroof. First I cut the 'far edge'.

(.032 slitting blade and fence from MicroMark on a Proxxon table saw.)
Then I can cut the 'near edge', the paper keeps the blade from hitting the fence.

It's better to be a bit 'over' than 'under', since I can sand everything smooth after the subroof is glued to the subwalls.


This works best in an assembly line, where I can work on one car while the glue or paint dries on the other.

There are two small tools I want to mention. The little black thing is a small set-up square from LeeValley, it's 1" x 3/4" x 1/2". I use it a lot as a saddle square, to extend a line across an outside corner. The other one is that tiny square with the brass base and steel blade. I found that at a hobby store in Japan, and got it, frankly, because it was 'cute." But it turns out a very small square is really handy, in part because it's light and easy to hold against a small piece. Tthey're sitting on an Incra 'centering ruler,' which is handy for when I'm too lazy to measure and do the math to find the center, for instance the center line on the undercarriage.

I need to find my phone book paper and figure out how I'll do the roof.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 11/11/2019 10:26:07 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7948 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/11/2019 :  7:07:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I found a piece of telephone book paper, so I used it for the roof sections. The roof is .040 styrene, the paper is glued onto that with "Super Phastic", then painted with grey gesso and finally with neutral grey artist acrylic. I like the small wrinkles and imperfections I get with the paper, makes it look like a canvas roof (which is what I'm modeling.) I also added fascia trim (and painted the undercarriage, which you can't see in this photo.) The doors are made from .020 scribed siding (.040 spacing), with .020x.080 on either side. (That's a detail I saw on a prototype drawing, and though it would be a good one to add to my doors.)

(The door is just sitting in place, I'll glue it tomorrow and add the rest of the door hardware.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7948 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 11/11/2019 :  7:50:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Coming along well.


Country: USA | Posts: 5564 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 11/11/2019 :  10:15:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good progress. I think the siding on the 2nd car looks better. And, you made a good choice of trucks.


Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5326 Go to Top of Page
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