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 Upgrading a Pocher boxcar
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OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 08/01/2019 :  10:14:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking mighty fine, Tintic! What 'cha gonna' do fer decals?


Dave w/voices:

Nice!

I stumbled upon the "dark at the bottom edges" way back in my dark ages (when my hair was dark) and I building and amassing a pile of MDC OT Reefers/Boxcars for my TOC19 Ozark theme of the time. Like you say, doing so helps make 'em look "right", especially on lighter colored reefer cars. Shame I sold all of them off in The Great Sell Off (liquidated everything we could to get us into a home), but they're too new for my late 1880s era, anyway.

Enjoying this thread and love this forum.

Andre




Edited by - OK Hogger on 08/01/2019 10:16:42 AM

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Tintic Range
New Hire

Posted - 08/01/2019 :  2:48:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by deemery

One thing you'll notice on both houses and cars is the very bottom of the wood tends to be dark. That's because rain stops there, deposits dirt, and sometimes encourages mildew to grow. This is an easy effect to get, put a little bit of medium brown paint on the brush (like drybrushing) and hold it at a 45 degree angle along the base of the car. That'll put some paint on the bottom edge of the siding, and get some paint along the very bottom of the sides.



Something that many modelers don't realize is that weathering patterns are actually regional. That may work for places that actually get regular rainfall, but the region I model the biggest forces of nature to be reckoned with are sun bleaching and sand scoring (wind literally sandblasting the paint off). Mildews, molds and mosses are completely out of the question, and water damages like rust streaking or dirt trails are minimal.

The sand scoring, caused by wind but increased by dust thrown up in transit, usually strips the underframe and lower sills leaving the bare wood to then be bleached by the sun, which was the effect I was going for.

With most soils in this region being alkaline, they are almost white, so road dust also lightens up the underframes. I've seen a coal train on the Salt Lake Route (SPLA&SL between Salt Lake City and Los Angeles) kick up a massive cloud of white dust that turned the coal itself white as well as the cars.



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OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 08/01/2019 :  3:32:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This modeler didn't realize that, having never really been interested in railroads in arid/desert/dessert-like conditions.

Thanks for the info!

Andre



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dave1905
Fireman



Posted - 08/01/2019 :  7:48:02 PM  Show Profile  Visit dave1905's Homepage  Reply with Quote
One thing I also see is a lot of "over weathering". If you are modeling the 1890's and have 36 ft boxcar (built in the 1890's), its a brand new car and won't have all the damage. If you are modeling 1920 and have a 36 ft truss rod car (built in the 1890's), then maybe its going to have the damage.

Dave Husman

Iron Men and wooden cars
Visit my website : www.wnbranch.com

Country: USA | Posts: 1145 Go to Top of Page

Tintic Range
New Hire

Posted - 08/01/2019 :  9:29:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dave1905

One thing I also see is a lot of "over weathering". If you are modeling the 1890's and have 36 ft boxcar (built in the 1890's), its a brand new car and won't have all the damage. If you are modeling 1920 and have a 36 ft truss rod car (built in the 1890's), then maybe its going to have the damage.



In terms of physical damage, that is true, but I would argue that we forget how quickly paints degrade. Nevada Northern restored their AC&F 36' boxcars in 2006 and by 2010 the paint had faded from a deep red to a dull tan and was already flaking off the wood.

I am also working on some Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company 34' cars that were inherited from Union Pacific in 1898. Prototype photos taken in 1900 show that in the two short years since being repainted, the OR&N lettering was already degraded enough to reveal the Union Pacific lettering underneath.


Or even older OR&N lettering


Of course I am not an advocate of overweathering; the majority of my boxcars are actually pretty clean with only light road dust along the underframe/sills. This project however is meant to represent a car at least 10 years old by 1898 (the Pocher body comes out to about 33 feet) and having spent the majority of its operating life moving galena (silver/lead ore) from mines to mills.



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Tintic Range
New Hire

Posted - 08/02/2019 :  9:21:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is where I'm at now. I haven't decided on a roadname yet, but started filling in the small data using some scrap decals. Unfortunately after applying the weight I realized that the date is 1901. Oops!







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Tintic Range
New Hire

Posted - 08/21/2019 :  11:14:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Because the historic photo that inspired this project was taken in the Salt Lake & Ogden yard, I decided to letter it for the SL&O. I used three different decal sets to piece it together based on the only two (incredibly blurry) photographs of SL&O freight cars I am aware of that show the lettering.

Once the dullcote dried a Preiser figure hitched a ride to the mines in search of work.


Download Attachment: Capture.JPG
128.6 KB



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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/22/2019 :  10:42:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice! The unpainted wood roof walks are 'more frequently seen than modeled.' You might want to add some exposed metal on the roof ribs, to show they're also metal, and I'd suspect they'd tend to shed paint even more than the panels (because I'd guess they'd be more likely to have heat contraction/expansion stress.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 08/25/2019 :  09:33:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great conversion! Like Andre I also have some to convert. Will be a good reference when I get to them.

Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1730 Go to Top of Page

Tintic Range
New Hire

Posted - 09/07/2019 :  6:30:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I took a diorama out to take some natural light photos of some of my recent projects including this car. Nothing beats real sunlight to make your models look better than they really are!





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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 09/07/2019 :  7:24:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Yes, looks good


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