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Author Previous Topic: Lous Kitbashing a Livestock trailer truck Topic Next Topic: Das Boot, a 1/35 scale WWII U-Boat diorama
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Glen Haasdyk
Fireman



Posted - 05/16/2019 :  9:02:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I managed to get a bit done today.



I started with getting the cab finished off. I added the doubler and front framework for the roof





Then I added the roof. This part needed to be curved down in the front and the front-sides to match the compound curve of the framework. I then filled any gaps with some extra glue.




I covered the roof with some tissue paper and painted it black. then I started to add the flatdeck parts.




Darryl has found a clever way to assemble the stake sides and get perfect alignment.



First layer the two parts of the stake side together







Then cut the larger boards that were used for alignment off and you have a completed assembly.




Country: Canada | Posts: 2252 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 05/16/2019 :  9:09:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Very cool.


Country: USA | Posts: 5100 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 05/17/2019 :  09:52:58 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote

Glen, that doesn't look like a shake the box type kit no way. Nice job on such a difficult project.



Country: USA | Posts: 5280 Go to Top of Page

CWRailman
Engine Wiper

Premium Member

Posted - 05/17/2019 :  11:23:52 AM  Show Profile  Visit CWRailman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Glen Haasdyk


Denny, I could devote a whole thread on airbrushing acrylics. But I think you were referring to the bottle of green artists acrylic on the workbench? I thinned it with some Testors acrylic airbrush thinner and sprayed it with my badger 200 internal mix brush.



You sort of answered my question as I was wondering what you used to thin the paint down for spraying and what you used to spray it. About 40 years ago we attempted to spray acrylics for a project we were doing for our club and the results were less than satisfactory and I have not revisited that technique since that time. I have read about several different methods /materials used for thinning Acrylics including 99% Isopropyl Alcohol but I have not seen much result as applied for our use. I have also been led to believe that not all acrylic paints respond the same to thinning products. I am also wondering about durability. Someday I might run out of the Floquil I have stocked up on and may have to seriously explore different paints. Since you use an internal mix air brush, do you find any difficulty in cleaning as internal mixture brushes are notorious for needing comprehensive cleaning rituals. I am not so enthused about cleaning my air brushes after every use hence, one of the reasons I prefer and have always used use single action for the past 40 plus years.

Denny
Janitor in Training
CW Loco and Car Rebuild Shops
WEB site: http://www.cwrailman.com/
Facebook: CWRailman



Country: USA | Posts: 386 Go to Top of Page

Glen Haasdyk
Fireman



Posted - 05/17/2019 :  8:36:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Denny,
It is true that not all acrylics are thinned with the same products. I find the testors airbrush thinner works for Polly-s, testors and the paint (golden) that I used on the green cab of this truck. I have used true-lines paint (not available anymore) and thinned it with their thinner. I recently bought some paint from Rapido Trains and I'll be using their thinner as well. I sort of figure that my paint job is worth the extra 7-9$ to pick up the same brand thinner but the testors thinner might work for them too. The only acrylic paint that I found does need to be thinned with the same brand thinner is Tamiya, but that's a totally different animal. I find acrylics do hold up fairly well, but I'm not handling my rolling stock that much.
My Badger 200 internal mix is a single action airbrush and it's one of the reasons that I switched to acrylics. It's a pretty fast process to flush the airbrush out and switch paint colors which is a big plus when you are using it for weathering. When I'm done with one color, I just take the airbrush to the laundry room, take the tip off and flush the tip and main body out with water, then proceed with the next color.
I have two airbrushes, the Badger 200 for the acrylics and an external mix Paasche airbrush that I use for solvent based paints like floquil and Scalecoat. I really only use solvent based paints when I can't get the color in an acrylic.



Edited by - Glen Haasdyk on 05/17/2019 9:22:19 PM

Country: Canada | Posts: 2252 Go to Top of Page

JeffB
Crew Chief

Posted - 05/18/2019 :  11:10:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Denny and Glen,

The other consideration when using an airbrush is the fineness of the grind of pigment in the paint. As I understand it, the pigment in acrylic craft paint is not as finely ground as paint specifically formulated for scale models and higher quality artist acrylics. With that in mind, I have been able to airbrush acrylic craft paint using a larger needle size; at least 0.4mm.

Jeff



Edited by - JeffB on 05/18/2019 11:11:41 AM

Country: Canada | Posts: 694 Go to Top of Page

Glen Haasdyk
Fireman



Posted - 05/18/2019 :  7:06:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Oh Yes thanks you Jeff. I don't airbrush with the craft acrylic paint for that reason. I have sprayed the Golden brand with a cheaper external mix airbrush but I've found that the internal mix Badger atomizes the paint better.


Country: Canada | Posts: 2252 Go to Top of Page

CWRailman
Engine Wiper

Premium Member

Posted - 05/18/2019 :  9:45:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit CWRailman's Homepage  Reply with Quote

Years ago, back in the mid 1980ís I had an acquaintance that owned a company that supplied pigmentation to paint companies. I gave him a bottle of Floquil and one of Scalecoat to test as he was not at all familiar with the brands. After about a month I asked him about the two and he said that he could not grind pigmentation fine enough to supply Floquil as it was among the finest he had ever seen but that he could supply pigmentation for Scalecoat. I had suspected that would be the answer as I found Scalecoat tended to hide detail much more than Floquil. Now if I could only get some actual automotive lacquer from back in the 1940-1950 era as was used by modelers back then to paint their locomotives.
Denny
Janitor in Training
CW Loco and Car Rebuild Shops
WEB site: http://www.cwrailman.com/
Facebook: CWRailman





Country: USA | Posts: 386 Go to Top of Page

Glen Haasdyk
Fireman



Posted - 05/18/2019 :  11:38:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I believe I have noticed that difference when spraying floquil and scalecoat. Of course there was also scalecoat 1 and scalecoat 2 but that's a different story.

Some small progress on the truck this afternoon.




I glued the sides onto the flatdeck.

And assembled the wheels.





Each wheel has three parts, one wheels and two tire overlays.




I glued the parts together then sanded the tire tread and the edges a bit for some contour. I just repainted them and tomorrow I'll be able to start mounting them onto the truck.



Country: Canada | Posts: 2252 Go to Top of Page

slimrails
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/19/2019 :  08:10:23 AM  Show Profile  Visit slimrails's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Looking good, Glen. That's going to be one sweet little T.


Country: USA | Posts: 8350 Go to Top of Page

Glen Haasdyk
Fireman



Posted - 05/20/2019 :  09:57:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, I finished of the truck late last night




There wasn't much left to do but some was very small and fiddly.




I installed the wheels, axles and the grill and hood. I posed the front wheels on a turn for a change.





The last items assembled are the front marker lamps and the rear tail light. These are so small that my tweezers had trouble gripping them properly.





And now I've started on the second one.





I want to build this one as considerably more aged than the first.



Country: Canada | Posts: 2252 Go to Top of Page

CWRailman
Engine Wiper

Premium Member

Posted - 05/20/2019 :  10:55:22 AM  Show Profile  Visit CWRailman's Homepage  Reply with Quote

Glen,
And so what are your impressions of the kit. Ease of assembly and how the parts fit together when compared to the Jordan vehicles. In looking at the images the cross section of the parts seem to be much thicker than the Jordan vehicles. Is that true? How about the amount of detail such as in the reliefs of the fenders etc when compared to a Jordan vehicle. How do you rate the instructions and sequence order of assembly? As has been reported someplace else if the owner's last wishes are carried out the dies for the Jordan vehicles will be destroyed and kits such as this might be the only alternative for future generations.

Denny
Janitor in Training
CW Loco and Car Rebuild Shops
WEB site: http://www.cwrailman.com/
Facebook: CWRailman





Edited by - CWRailman on 05/20/2019 11:14:05 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 386 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 05/20/2019 :  1:58:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This first came out Great. I'm looking forward to the second.

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5140 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/20/2019 :  5:04:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks good, Glen. I'm sure fitting those little pieces together so everything was in alignment was a challenge.

It must have been fun since you're going after #2.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 15151 Go to Top of Page

Glen Haasdyk
Fireman



Posted - 05/20/2019 :  5:37:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks everyone.
Denny, Now that I have built Both Jordans and these I'd have to say that they are pretty similar in construction. Both are basically flat parts to be built into 3-d constructs. As I said the most difficult part was forming the fenders to fit on the main body but after I did the first, the second was pretty easy. (yes I've gotten that far on that one) The instructions were pretty good as well and Darryl has posted a video of him building one of these with some extra tips. I didn't find the parts any thicker than a Jordan.
I would like to mention that if you are comparing Jordans to these, make sure you compare a Model T to a Model T and not a Model A of newer vehicle. Model T's are pretty square compared to a newer model, which makes this construction a bit more practical. If one was to make a kit of a Model A, I would think the fenders would have to be 3-d printed as well to achieve the compound curves in them
Overall I really enjoyed building the kit and have already gotten parts of the second closed-cab pickup ready for paint.



Country: Canada | Posts: 2252 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 3 Previous Topic: Lous Kitbashing a Livestock trailer truck Topic Next Topic: Das Boot, a 1/35 scale WWII U-Boat diorama  
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