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Author Previous Topic: Tenement Row by Smallshaw Topic Next Topic: O scale Life Preserver
Page: of 29

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/18/2019 :  7:43:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Mike and George, and Tony for stepping up to bat for us !!

Thanks for your exchanges on the wood product. Regarding products used for roofing, I did buy one sheet of the walnut plywood, and have used it sparingly. I think I have had it five years now, and about half of the sheet is left. I like it for something you may handle a lot over just merely using it for a roof anywhere. If you don't want to spend that kind of cash, there are other products out there that are cheaper. One in particular is chip board. I bought some at a JoAnn's Fabric store, a while back, one sheet (12" x 12") for $0.99 + tax. Now, they no longer carry it. On another trip, I picked up a ream of 110 LB brown paper by Parklane 100 sheets/solid core/smooth to use. I haven't tried it yet, but its got to be close to the chipboard for thickness and rigidity. We shall see.



Any of these products, and there may be others will work. One thing for floors, I like to take either the chip board or the paper, and glue stripwood to it for flooring. Everytime I try to use scribed sheeting for flooring, it always warps, or I have to constantly keep it under weights. Thanks for your input.

Rich




Country: USA | Posts: 4081 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/18/2019 :  8:00:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
To continue...is a virtue...again...

When building a lot of roofs, some always use full rafters or rafter tails along the lower edges of roofs.
For my building, I chose not to add them, because my roof trim is so close to the roof on all sides. Rather than fiddle with glue and placement on the roof trim edges, I chose to glue my roof trim (lowest edges), to the very top of the side walls. When the roof is set for final placement, the trim appears to be on the roof instead of the walls. I have a picture than shows this, but will post that one later.
So, what I decided to do for fortifying my walnut plywood roof, (keeping everything flat and layed-down)was to glue full pieces of sheet wood to the underside of each room or section. The extra wood also helped for added weight to the roof, as these roofs will be removabe and handled a lot. These will not bend up at all.
Here's a picture showing the main building roof w/trim and a small piece of wood inside the bathroom roof, at the top of the door. I had cut the small building corner supports too short, so a thin piece was added to adjust to the height of the wall over the door.




Most folks would probably just glue on the wood roof, but I decided to make a full piece of wood for the underside roof in this area as well. This gives more strength to the finished roof, and yes, it too is removable. My thoughts here are for adjustment of interior lighting at a later time. You can't do that if the roof is glued on. Also, with the piece of wood glued to the center of the roof, adding the roof edging trim is much easier to see for correct placement.

Placing the roof on the building to center it's edges


Here's a picture showing the roof underside wood with the roof edging trim to be added.




Here is the completed bathroom roof on the building.







After completing the bathroom with the extra piece of sheet wood, I decided it would be really easy to do the same thing on the main building. I have added two pieces of sheet wood to the underside for the shorter side of the roof. There is a gap between the wood sheets due to the top of the room divider wall.




In the following picture I am cutting the entire wood sheet to fit the opening for the longer roof panel. I decided to go all the way up to the roof ridge with this board. I remember that there was a gap (sag) in the roof at that point, that this sheet will now cover. Like I mentioned earlier, this would have been taken care of if I had installed rafters, but for a building as easy as this, the extra wood panels will work just fine, and no one will know the difference.




Here is the completed underside of the roof with the wood sheets applied.



I will paint them white like the lower walls, which will bring in a lot of natural light.
That's it for this evening. Thanks for all of the great comments.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4081 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/18/2019 :  8:01:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Railrunner130

Interesting roofing choice Rich. Looks good!



Thank you, Chris. And for stopping by.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4081 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 02/18/2019 :  9:53:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks great Rich. Nice job using the walnut for strength.

Jerry

"And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 11408 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 02/18/2019 :  10:11:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Rich,

Great idea to use the walnut wood. Are you sure it's plywood. Never seen it that thin other than the birch ply made by Midwest or Revell Monogram 3/32 X 12 X 24. I also went to Michael's web site. No listing of walnut plywood.

I like the colors of the building. Starting to come together.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 3114 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/18/2019 :  10:48:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Jerry and Bernd.

Bernd - I believe the wood to be plywood, at least that's what it said on the rack at the store. The next time I go, I will look at the stickers on the wood. I don't leave them on long when I buy them because they use adhesive, and it's a sticky mess on the part with the sticker attached, so I remove them at once. Upon a closer look in hand, it does appear to be two very thin veneers, sandwiched with a darker filament in the center. If we really want a good, clear picture, we would have to wake up ole Karl, and muster out his expensive camera with the 8 degree tilt.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4081 Go to Top of Page

Karl Osolinski
Fireman



Posted - 02/19/2019 :  09:11:26 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Pennman

Thanks Jerry and Bernd.

Bernd - I believe the wood to be plywood, at least that's what it said on the rack at the store. The next time I go, I will look at the stickers on the wood. I don't leave them on long when I buy them because they use adhesive, and it's a sticky mess on the part with the sticker attached, so I remove them at once. Upon a closer look in hand, it does appear to be two very thin veneers, sandwiched with a darker filament in the center. If we really want a good, clear picture, we would have to wake up ole Karl, and muster out his expensive camera with the 8 degree tilt.

Rich



Hi Rich,

I saw you're using walnut sheet for your roof and mentioned it was rather pricey. Have you ever tried a product called Taskboard? It's very nice stuff made from some sort of ground up wood. It's very easy to cut, doesn't warp and quite inexpensive. I use it for all sorts of roofing and wall boards.

Buying it from taskboard.com is a killer when it comes to the freight cost so I get the 20"x30" sheets from Dick Blick for $3.65 a sheet (1/32" & 1/16"). The 1/16" is a bit more but not that much as I recall. My chipboard now sits lonely and ignored in the basement closet!

Anyway, just a thought you might want to give a try...

Cheers,

Ole' Karl O.
Berkley, MI



Country: | Posts: 1971 Go to Top of Page

Karl Osolinski
Fireman



Posted - 02/19/2019 :  09:26:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by robert goslin

Karl, I really like your diorama, with a structure and a truck, so able to honor both Frederic and Chester in the one setting. very nice, and as always a very high standard.

Just curious, did you do a thread for these 2 builds ? I haven't seen one.




Hi Bob,

Thanks, glad you like the models.

I built that garage some years back but can't recall if I did a build thread on it...I'm 74 years old now and the memory just doesn't work as well as it use to.

I saw the garage sitting in my workroom and thought it would be a nice model to honor Chester and Frederic - 2 fellas' whose work I admired a great deal. So I took it off the shelf to spruce it up a bit. I dusted it off, cleaned and repainted many of the castings and sprayed it with a good shot of contact cleaner and thought it would be OK to use in this thread. I had already started building the tow truck to use in the photos so I didn't even think of taking build photos of it...sorry.

Cheers,

Karl O.
Berkley, MI



Edited by - Karl Osolinski on 02/19/2019 11:11:14 AM

Country: | Posts: 1971 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/19/2019 :  12:31:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Karl Osolinski

quote:
Originally posted by Pennman

Thanks Jerry and Bernd.

Bernd - I believe the wood to be plywood, at least that's what it said on the rack at the store. The next time I go, I will look at the stickers on the wood. I don't leave them on long when I buy them because they use adhesive, and it's a sticky mess on the part with the sticker attached, so I remove them at once. Upon a closer look in hand, it does appear to be two very thin veneers, sandwiched with a darker filament in the center. If we really want a good, clear picture, we would have to wake up ole Karl, and muster out his expensive camera with the 8 degree tilt.

Rich



Hi Rich,

I saw you're using walnut sheet for your roof and mentioned it was rather pricey. Have you ever tried a product called Taskboard? It's very nice stuff made from some sort of ground up wood. It's very easy to cut, doesn't warp and quite inexpensive. I use it for all sorts of roofing and wall boards.

Buying it from taskboard.com is a killer when it comes to the freight cost so I get the 20"x30" sheets from Dick Blick for $3.65 a sheet (1/32" & 1/16"). The 1/16" is a bit more but not that much as I recall. My chipboard now sits lonely and ignored in the basement closet!

Anyway, just a thought you might want to give a try...

Cheers,

Ole' Karl O.
Berkley, MI



Well O'le Karl O, no I never bought any taskboard, nor did I ever look for any, but will give it a try, if I can find some. Thanks for the tip.
Does it warp like cardboard would?

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4081 Go to Top of Page

spyder62
Crew Chief



Posted - 02/19/2019 :  1:13:49 PM  Show Profile  Visit spyder62's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Rich, no it does not warp. Plus it is formable when wet then holds it's shape. I have some samples I did like 5 years ago I take to shows and they still are the same as when I formed them with no bracing.
Another thing is if you wet them and then press flat the sheet becomes even stronger. They must have a glue that sets after it gets wet added when they make it.

rich
rslaserkits


In my many years I have come to a conclusion that one useless man is a shame,
two is a law firm and three or more is a congress.
--John Adams

Country: USA | Posts: 631 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 02/19/2019 :  1:33:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
It would be nice if a link could be provided so others can decide if Taskboard® is something they could use.

https://taskboard.com/

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 3114 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 02/19/2019 :  1:53:46 PM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Hi guys.

Looking good Rob and Rich.

Rob - remember those nail holes are where the studs are in the walls behind. That is typically also where the clapboard joins would be. I usually do my rows of nail holes and then put my clapboard joins on top of the nail holes. This pretty much makes those nail holes disappear. I then add four more nail holes, two each side of the join. These represent the skew nails.

Rich - nice fitting of those roof sections.

well - bit more progress.

Here is the lean-to roof glued in position. Window glazing and blinds have been added.


Here is a strip of aluminium foil attached to double sided tape. I have bent it longways at 90 degrees using a steel rule and a single sided razor blade.


Here I am easing it into position after carefully removing the tape backing with the help of the end of a steel rule.


Here is the flashing stuck in position. I use a toothpick to press the foil into the undulations of the roofing material (this represtents a lead flashing).


And lastly the ridge capping. This is the same principle except I run a piece of thin plastic rod down the center of the flashing before I install. Again, a toothpick is used to press the foil into the undulations. I leave the flashing a little longer than the roof and fold the excess over the end of the rod.


More soon, cheers, Mark.



Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1040 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 02/19/2019 :  4:01:38 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Rich, nice work on the roofs. Your whole project displays a lot of down-home personality.

Mark, you’re doing roofs also. Again, lots of personality. The way you did the ridge cap is worth remembering.



Country: USA | Posts: 5107 Go to Top of Page

robert goslin
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/19/2019 :  9:42:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Rich, The roof is looking good, as is your whole progress.

Karl, Thanks for the reply. Nice to see an old structure bought back to life.


Regards Rob

Despite the cost of living, it's still popular.

Country: Australia | Posts: 1998 Go to Top of Page

robert goslin
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/19/2019 :  9:47:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark, thanks for the advice about the nail holes and board joins. I will add some extra holes on the other side of join.
I'm really going more for effect. As an N scaler, we don't worry about nail holes, but this being in O scale, it's an opportunity to add some more detail.

Your structure is really coming along now. I like all the tin siding, and you've even added flashing. A nice detail.
Is the metal work going to look new, or rusty ?
Cheers.


Regards Rob

Despite the cost of living, it's still popular.

Edited by - robert goslin on 02/19/2019 9:48:12 PM

Country: Australia | Posts: 1998 Go to Top of Page
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