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Author Previous Topic: Matching Corporate Colors Topic Next Topic: Lobster Shed
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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/06/2018 :  9:42:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A little while ago I built an O scale lobster shack Using my Cricut Explore Air for most of the cutting. Here's a link to that build:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=50263

This time I'm building a small HO structure out of styrene. It has a 20' x 14' footprint. It's a project for my train club that will be located at the entrance to a car rebuild facility. The building's purpose is to house the time clock workers punch going to and from work. I have other irons in the fire that may slow this build down. For example I need to make a chain link fence that is part of the scene where this building will sit.

As in all my projects, I'm using AutoSketch to make the drawings. The nice thing about this is that when I'm done making a drawing, I send it to the Cricut machine where the material is cut for an identical match to the drawing. Well, that's the way it's supposed to work. I'm learning a lot about cut settings for different materials and some of the machine's limitations. Maybe some day it will run nice and smooth.

This is my current set of drawings:



The windows are going to be Grandt Line 5233 double hung windows (selected because I have them in my window collection). The current challenge I'm working on is scratch building the doors. At least two will be open and I don't have anything like that in my parts box. The reason one outside wall is blank is the time clock and cards will be on that wall.

I started by cutting out a mock up from card stock the thickness of an index card. The doors in the mock up are wrong, they will all be the same size. I've decided to only have two windows in the actual building. I make a lot of changes in the early planning.





One of the many advantages of CAD and Cricut is the ease of making the mock up and the ease of making changes to the plans.

George


Country: USA | Posts: 14565

BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/07/2018 :  01:39:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice start on this one.

Jim



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Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 06/07/2018 :  09:43:42 AM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Agreed Jim. I like the possibilities I'm seeing here..


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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/07/2018 :  5:07:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Jim and Carl. I'm also interested in where this leads.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14565 Go to Top of Page

wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 06/07/2018 :  6:27:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I am looking forward to seeing your clinic in September, George! There is another member of our division that uses a Cricut for N scale. I think he is interested in seeing your clinic, too. So, you will have at least two people in the audience.

Chuck



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Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 06/07/2018 :  6:49:32 PM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
George it will be interesting to see how thick the Cricut will cut styrene. But do continue,I liked your last build so let's see what happens now.


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Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/08/2018 :  06:34:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
George,

I agree with Carl and others in stating interesting aspects for different possibilities.
If one didn't use styrene, you could take the thickest cardstock and cover it with stripwood.

I'm wondering if the cricut cutter would work on styrene board and batten, if it would cut over the battens without injuring the cuts. Maybe try it with the flat side up.

I will be following along with your progress on this one.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 3519 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/08/2018 :  07:51:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the interest guys. The machine has limits in the thickness of styrene it will cut. It won't cut all the way through clapboard siding sheets which are 0.040" thick. It will scribe it deep enough so you can snap the plastic along the cut lines.

Rich, I haven't tried cutting from the back, but will give it a try on some scrap sheets I have. I'll let you know how it works.

George



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jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/08/2018 :  9:31:39 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Without knowing anything about a Cricut except that my fiancee uses one to cut stickers for custom t-shirts, I'd expect cutting clapboard from the back would be easier on the machine - interrupted cuts are hard on machine tools.


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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/11/2018 :  10:50:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James, you raised an interesting question about cutting from the back and I had to look into that.

To cut the 0.040 thick siding, I have the machine set at a heavy pressure setting and it makes four passes with the cutting blade. I use that setting to cut from the front or back. I did a test cut from the back that looked like this.



And this from the front.



It obviously didn't cut through the 0.040 styrene and of course it doesn't cut through when coming from the front either.

I made several passes with a #11 blade and it came through the styrene. Except for the corners which took a little extra work. All in all an easy task.



Here are the final results. The circle is 3' in diameter, HO scale.



The circle took quite a bit of work, since I had to be turning the styrene while putting pressure on the knife. The ragged edges are more noticeable on the circle.

Here's a closeup of the cuts. The box was cut by a knife from the back. The extended line was bent and snapped away from the cut surface on the back.



What you are seeing is that the knife (right side) made a vertical cut in the styrene causing a little deforming of the edges of the siding. On the left side, which was snapped off, the edges of the siding were deformed.

This is a picture of an early cut I made from the front of the sheet. To give you an idea about the width of the cut, the siding spacing is 0.050. That little shaving of styrene in the corner between the roof and the wall was pushed out by the cutting blade. I'm not sure if it came from the angle cut of the roof line or the horizontal wall cut. Either way it's minor and a little dressing of the edges after everything is snapped apart will have it looking good.



My verdict is that it's probably better to cut from the front since snapping the pieces apart when cut from the back distorts the siding edges. Cutting (scoring) those edges from the front causes less distortion.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14565 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/14/2018 :  8:49:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The walls are assembled and painted. I glued them to the edges of a 0.015 floor piece That was cut with the Cricut machine.



The whole thing was glued to a piece of 0.040 styrene to represent the foundation. This was cut (scribe and snap) with the Cricut.



The corner posts haven't been glued in. The building will be lighted, so it's important no light leaks out from any seam.

The roof is a a standing seam metal roof. I started with a sheet of 0.015 styrene and had Cricut scribe lines for guides locating where the seams would go (1X2 styrene strips) and cut the outside edges. You have to trick Cricut to do this. If a drawing has a line on top of a line Cricut will cut each line, or make two passes. I made a single line for each seam line and laid four lines on top of one another for the outside cuts. I set the machine at a low pressure setting so the seam lines would only be a scribed line.



I then fastened the roof panels to a drawing that was based on the roof cutting drawing except the lines for the seams were extended.




After the 1X2 strips were glued on to represent the seams, the ends of the strips were trimmed and the roof panels separated.




Here's the roof after it's been painted and assembled. The roof will be removable to make the lighting and maintenance of the lighting easier.



Next are the doors.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14565 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/15/2018 :  08:27:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
George,

Like Chuck, I'm looking forward to seeing your clinic at the NER Convention this September. It seems like the Circut cutting tool has potential...





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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/15/2018 :  8:12:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bruce, I'm having a lot of fun with the machine and I'm still learning new ways to use it.

George



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Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/16/2018 :  07:44:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


Mike

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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/18/2018 :  08:07:50 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Mike


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desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 06/18/2018 :  10:44:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice looking start on your structure, and looks like your having fun with that machine George, as you stated, there must be many new learning curves ahead. Looking forward to your progress.


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