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 Etched brass locomotive kit build
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Author Previous Topic: The Coos Bay and Willamette Valley Topic Next Topic: 1840 depot on the Hudson River
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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 05/07/2018 :  8:48:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Håkan,

I’ve long wanted to build a kit like this. I’m interested in what tools you use. Fascinating project.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 5172 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 05/07/2018 :  9:08:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Håkan,

I’ve long wanted to build a kit like this. I’m interested in what tools you use. Fascinating project.

Mike



Agreed! Please enlighten us!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 6642 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 05/07/2018 :  9:28:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
First off, he has a big jar full of "Skill" he opens and uses liberally.

You're welcome.



Andre



Edited by - OK Hogger on 05/07/2018 9:29:33 PM

Country: | Posts: 802 Go to Top of Page

ekul24
New Hire

Posted - 05/11/2018 :  04:15:05 AM  Show Profile  Send ekul24 an AOL message  Reply with Quote
A great looking engine Håkan. I'm following with interest.

Luke Blackbeard

http://thoroughfaregaprailroad.blogspot.co.nz/

Country: New Zealand | Posts: 39 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 05/13/2018 :  03:52:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks guys, I’m glad you are following along!

Bob not at the moment but I’m contemplating it. Will see how it comes along. I like the look of English locomotives Americanized as they did in the early times in Canada. They have a weird look to them. Here is a photo of an early such engine.


Or this
https://www.gettyimages.co.uk/detail/news-photo/men-turn-the-great-western-railway-steam-locomotive-no-4-in-news-photo/613472648

Jim the kit came with a small Mashima motor. I reamed out the bearings mostly because I had filed them down on the inside but also to give a nice clearance for the axles.

This weekend summer came in force so it has not been much time over for modelling. But I managed to add the brake shoes. I folded them the wrong way but it was easily done to fold them back into the right position. The shoes seem to be made of wood from the prototype photos. I added them and the rods as can be seen in the photos below.




Next is to make the chassie fit the superstructure. Somehow the frame is too long to fit. I carefully filed at both ends until it fit. I also had to carve out some material from underneath the superstructure. I use a very handy carving tool made for carving away excess solder. I don’t know what its called in English as I bought it from a Swedish dealer.


Next is to fit the wheelsets. The wheelsets are very nice but experience tell me that their tires sometimes can be off-center to the axle. To check that I’ll put them in my lathe and if off-center turn them. See if I have time for that this evening.

Håkan



Edited by - masonamerican on 05/13/2018 03:53:14 AM

Country: Sweden | Posts: 1730 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 05/13/2018 :  06:20:04 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Håkan,
Very interesting build, and I love European engines. I had a brass kit once and sold it, believing it was far above my skill level (and at the time I believe it was). My dad had scratchbuilt a small English 0-4-0 switcher when I was still a child, but I've been more fascinated with the process than actually doing one. Maybe one day I will have a change of mind. I'll be following along too.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3067 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 05/13/2018 :  06:54:26 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Håkan,

Very neatly done. It’s going to be a beautiful and fine running model.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 5172 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 05/13/2018 :  12:12:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Håkan, The Engine is coming along splendidly. I agree the Canadian version does look weird but I'm keen to see you finish this so get cracking on it. I see so much potential in this approach for us. Photo etching own sheets isn't that hard and doesn't require expensive tools.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5186 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 05/26/2018 :  08:43:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Guys, sorry its been busy lately.

Thanks Tony, I'm glad you follow along. Today I have a small update, and tomorrow even more I hope.
Thanks Mike.
Bob photo etching is also quite cheap. A A4 sheet in 0.4mm brass cost about $20-25 to make.

Today I turned the wheels in the lathe to make sure they are not off-center. It is simply putting it in the lathe together with the axle. I use collets to get precision instead of a chuck. The setup can be seen in the photo below.


The cutting tool I have bought from a seller on Ebay.de and has a RP25 110 profile.


I run the lathe on quite a slow speed in the beginning letting the tool chip away. If the wheelrim is off center it is quite clearly shown when cutting by the old surface compared to the newly cut. I cut until the old Surface has merged with the new one. The wheels were quite ok. There was only one wheel which was quite badly off center. It was noticable when rotating in the lathe. Last I take fine sandpaper (1800 grit) and letting it smooth the newly cut surface before I remove the wheel from the lathe. As now so to say the axle and wheel are a unit I can't remove the wheel without marking the axle position. But this isn't needed as I mount the other wheel with a right hand lead I can remove the one I had cut previously. When assembling it after final cutting the old wheel will come in the right position by placing it with right lead.

Now the wheels are centred with the axle which hopefully will help getting smooth running.


Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1730 Go to Top of Page

BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/26/2018 :  09:12:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Håkan,

Looking good! Sure is handy to have a few tools, and the skills to use them. Especially when a little quirk in a build pops up.

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 4488 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 05/26/2018 :  10:15:03 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Håkan,

My thoughts are along the same lines as Jim’s. I have to add that centering drivers is way down on the list of things I would want to do and it’s disappointing that it should even necessary. Good thing you checked.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 5172 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 05/26/2018 :  10:39:00 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Håkan!

Fun to follow along with your build here you've got going.

An RP25 110 lathe tool, eh? Now how cool is that.

Later on I'll probably have some "non-RP25" wheels on which I was going to use the old "drill press and a file" routine. Hm. I may rethink that.

All fer now!

Andre



Country: | Posts: 802 Go to Top of Page

ocalicreek
Crew Chief

Posted - 05/26/2018 :  11:01:26 PM  Show Profile  Visit ocalicreek's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Out of round or off center drivers seems to be a quality control issue from earlier and more recent times. I encountered it most recently looking at rebuilding an Aristo-Craft HO 2-8-0, and a Bachmann Spectrum 4-6-0. Decades apart, but both with wobbly wonky drivers. I don't have a lathe and didn't want to waste any more time fiddling around with substandard stuff, so I bought a Slovenian-made IHC 2-6-0 and I'm very happy. Yes, it is flawed in some ways (oversized flanges, plastic frame, etc.) but it runs very well.

I've also been enjoying the 5 hour video on how to burn your fingers, er, build white metal and brass kits. Seems the Brits kept going when we in the US changed tack. Even the nicest Bowser kit can't hold up, detail-wise, with one of these beautiful kits. I'm a bit jealous, truth-be-told.

Ah well, for now I'll keep detailing my Mogul and watching your progress. I once redrew a crossword puzzle grid because the paper printed the wrong one. I had enough clues and basic knowledge to work out the blanks and general shape on graph paper. But I'm not sure I could do what you're doing with this kit. I really hope it turns out well.

Galen


My Train Blog: http://ocalicreek.blogspot.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 631 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 05/29/2018 :  1:39:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Jim and Mike. The drivers from that company has a reputation that they sometimes can be off-center. BUT, they are great in other ways with their built in quartering similar to Romford wheels.

Thanks Andre, quirky tools are what make the world go around#61514;

Thanks Galen. Sounds like the Mehano factory have (had?) better quality control#61514;
On the changed tack in the US could be the extensive the brass market which didn’t seem to catch on in England the same way as in the US.

I have made some more progress. I have assembled the gearbox temporarily to see how it performs. The gear axles should be soldered to the frame but I had them in place with some tape.



The gear box ran great so I endeavored to mount the side rods. They are photo etched and the fit between was quite tight so I reamed them out the holes a tiny, tiny bit. When assembling it and running the whole mechanism for the first time I was (VERY) pleasantly surprised to find that the mechanism ran very well in both directions without any hesitations.




Here is a movie of it running at slow speed.
https://flic.kr/p/26ugPem

Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1730 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 05/29/2018 :  1:55:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Håkan, wow that looks great, and runs very smoothly!
Fantastic work!

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 8302 Go to Top of Page
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