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Author Previous Topic: The Gallery: June 14 Its a B&W Month! Topic Next Topic: NEPROTO
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Dick Kuepper
Fireman



Posted - 07/31/2006 :  5:20:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit Dick Kuepper's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Although this is not in my backyard, I thought you might enjoy this true story.

And I do not want to hear a collective "AWWWWW"!





NAIROBI (AFP) - A baby hippopotamus that survived the tsunami waves on the Kenyan
coast has formed a strong bond with a giant male century-old tortoise, in an animal facility in the port city of Mombassa, officials said.

The hippopotamus, nicknamed Owen and weighing about 300 kilograms (650 pounds), was
swept down Sabaki River into the Indian Ocean, then forced back to shore when tsunami
waves struck the Kenyan coast on December 26, before wildlife rangers rescued him.



"It is incredible. A-less-than-a-year-old hippo has adopted a male tortoise, about a century
old, and the tortoise seems to be very happy with being a 'mother'," ecologist Paula Kahumbu, who is in charge of Lafarge Park, told AFP.



They swim, eat and sleep together," the ecologist added. "The hippo follows
the tortoise exactly the way it follows its mother. If somebody approaches the tortoise, the
hippo becomes aggressive, as if protecting its biological mother," Kahumbu added.



"The hippo is a young baby, he was left at a very tender age and by nature, hippos are
social animals that like to stay with their mothers for four years," he explained.







The one-year-old hippo calf christened Owen was found alone and dehydrated by wildlife rangers near the Indian Ocean following the tsunami.

He was placed in an enclosure at a wildlife sanctuary in the coastal city of Mombasa and befriended a male tortoise of a similar colour.

According to a park official, they sleep together, eat together and "have become inseparable".

"Since Owen arrived on the 27 December, the tortoise behaves like a mother to it," Haller Park tourism manager Pauline Kimoti told the BBC News website.

"The hippo follows the tortoise around and licks his face," she said.

The tortoise is named Mzee, which is Swahili for old man.





















Country: USA | Posts: 1659 Go to Top of Page

Cigarguy
Fireman



Posted - 07/31/2006 :  5:33:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
AAAAAAAW! Ooops, sorry. It is just such a cute story.

Mike
D&B Lumber Co.
"The Best Wood You Ever Saw!"

Country: USA | Posts: 3891 Go to Top of Page

rckwallaby
Crew Chief



Posted - 07/31/2006 :  6:52:28 PM  Show Profile  Visit rckwallaby's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Isn't it nice to see Gandma turtle finally coming out of her shell after all these years and being a bit more sociable !

AAAWWWWWWWWWwwwwww !
Sorry.
I apologise.

Phil



Country: Australia | Posts: 662 Go to Top of Page

rckwallaby
Crew Chief



Posted - 07/31/2006 :  7:05:03 PM  Show Profile  Visit rckwallaby's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Bonnie found this gal chomping on our tomato plants. Mother nature isn't always pretty.





That looks like an 'about to be very dead' caterpillar. The white things are the pupae of a predatory wasp. The larvae that formed those pupae have been living inside the caterpillar feeding off it. Mother wasp would have speared the caterpillar and laid the eggs a few days ago. That caterpillar will never get to fly (live through its pupation.)

You're right Bruce, Mother Nature isn't always pretty, but she is always pretty fascinating.

Cheers
Phil



Country: Australia | Posts: 662 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/31/2006 :  9:25:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Phil,
Thanks for the info on the wasp pupae. We were wondering what the white thingies were. In fact, without her being covered in them, we probably wouldn't have seen her on the vine. Now, is that predatory wasp a Bayer development?


Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3

Country: USA | Posts: 25347 Go to Top of Page

rckwallaby
Crew Chief



Posted - 08/01/2006 :  12:06:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit rckwallaby's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Phil,
Thanks for the info on the wasp pupae.

Now, is that predatory wasp a Bayer development?



No Bruce them wasps are natural born killers courtesy of the BIG No1 Man or a million+ years of evolution.
Bayer are just definetly not that smart nor have they been around as long. Just a hundred years and some.

Cheers
Phil



Country: Australia | Posts: 662 Go to Top of Page

jatravia
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/01/2006 :  08:09:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow, really, they're wasp larva? That's cool ... and gross at the same time. I am not a bug person!

Joe <><



Country: USA | Posts: 2683 Go to Top of Page

k9wrangler
Fireman



Posted - 08/01/2006 :  7:48:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We had a visitor hovering around today;



WE have often 3 to 5 of the little hummers around the feeder much of the time.



Country: USA | Posts: 6674 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/01/2006 :  7:50:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great shot, Karl. We saw one by the flowers yesterday. Wish we could put out the sugar feeders, but they are bear magnets.

Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3

Country: USA | Posts: 25347 Go to Top of Page

wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 08/01/2006 :  8:00:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Wow, wonderful shot of the Hummingbird, Karl!

Chuck


Wyoming Valley Railroad
http://sites.google.com/site/wvrails/

Country: | Posts: 5252 Go to Top of Page

Dave D
Crew Chief



Posted - 08/01/2006 :  10:58:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit Dave D's Homepage  Click to see Dave D's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Great hummer shot!!

I got a surprise early one morning about 7 weeks ago.

I looked out at our pond and saw something tiny and thought a mouse or worse was swimming across it.

Then to my delight I saw it was a duckling!!!




Here is an edited pic for a close up.



The odd thing is we never saw any others or mom.

Maybe a Racoon got them....not sure.

Any way this guy is a survivor!!

Here he is in a pic taken yesterday.

We put a decoy out there to keep him company.

It is anchored next to the aerator discharge stone and it gets moved around a lot..he likes to hop up on its back and ride around in it like it is his own amusement park ride.





Edited by - Dave D on 08/01/2006 10:59:59 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 655 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/02/2006 :  07:37:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, it is odd to see only one duckling, and no mother -- but, it seems to be adapting.

Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3

Country: USA | Posts: 25347 Go to Top of Page

Dave D
Crew Chief



Posted - 08/02/2006 :  09:02:41 AM  Show Profile  Visit Dave D's Homepage  Click to see Dave D's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Yes Bruce he is doing great!

He's a little tough guy!

He started out on his own eating mosquito larva and those seeds with the fuzzy bits that fly everywhere in the early summer.

Now that he has grown we assist him with a poultry feed which has lots of whole grain and cracked corn in it.

At first we thought he might be a Mallard but we can now see he is a woodduck and a male no less.

He seems to know all there is about being a duck through instinct.... preening and what have you...so we are hoping that the flying bit works the same way.



Country: USA | Posts: 655 Go to Top of Page

railphotog
Fireman



Posted - 08/02/2006 :  11:57:48 AM  Show Profile  Visit railphotog's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Got this little fella on our back deck feeder a few days ago:



It's a female ruby throated hummingbird, and isn't usually very photogenic, as it sits on the perch and feeds away. Two years ago a similar bird would hover while feeding, and I got some real nice shots of it in action.

I shot several photos using my DSLR and its built in flash, while it was sitting there feeding. It wasn't until I looked at the photos that I saw several like this, with the wings flapping. Looks like the bird did the flapping during the 1/200th exposure, as I did not see any movement through the view finder. It would have had to hear the shutter opening, move its wings, then stop. The flash captured the unseen movement. I was using a 100-300mm zoom, and I was 7-8 feet away. Photo fun in the summer!


Bob Boudreau
My model railroad photography website:
http://sites.google.com/site/railphotog/

Country: Canada | Posts: 3781 Go to Top of Page

Marken
Fireman



Posted - 08/04/2006 :  9:46:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice shot Bob.



What you are looking at is the biggest lake fly hatch I have ever seen. Imagine a gazillion bees flying around your head, multiply by 4 and that's what it sounds like.

The wife will be spending her days indoors for awhile


In memory of Mike Chambers

Country: USA | Posts: 2915 Go to Top of Page
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