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Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 09/15/2017 :  8:56:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
First post for editing purposes. More to follow.

Bernd
A PESSIMIST sees a dark tunnel
An OPTIMIST sees light at the end of the tunnel
A REALIST sees a freight train
The LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER sees three idiots standing on the tracks

Country: USA | Posts: 2299

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 09/15/2017 :  9:07:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
A fellow modeler who models in TT scale asked if I had any idea on how to make an antenna for his Erie caboose. The antenna is 36 or 3 feet in diameter. That would be .300 or 3 tenths of an inch. He thought that since I had a CNC mill I could make a mold for plastic injection. I said Id see what I could come up with.

Here are some pictures of the Erie caboose antenna.



Considering the size that the antenna would be, .300" (7.62mm) in diameter and the size of wired needed, I figured a jig would be the best way. I don't think 3D printing would make the grade on this. We're talking .010" dia. wire being used here. Perhaps a brass part or plastic injection molding might work, but not for perhaps one piece, plus brass casting or injection molding is beyond home brew capabilities. So what to do? Well, a simple round jig will do.



I'm going to employ a method called "Chain Mail" http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Chainmail

I started by making a mandrel approximately .200" (5.08mm) on one end and .300" (7.62mm) on the other. A small hole is drilled through the small dia. part to hold the .010" (.254mm) phosphor bronze wire.

Here's the procedure for making a coil close to .300" dia.

The mandrel is held in the lathe with the wire threaded through the hole in the jig.



The lathe is turned on at a very low RPM, 2 or 3 rpm. The other end of the wire is held with a pair of pliers to give a tight wind on the mandrel. This is the way springs also made.



Once the tension is release the wire un-winds some what. This is why a smaller dia. than .300" is used.



Closer view of the spring/coils.



Next the coiled wire is placed over the .300" dia. part of the jig to facilitate the cutting of a .300" dia. ring of wire.



The end result is a ring close to the .300" dia. of the antenna.



Now that I can make coils of wire to .300" dia. I will need a way to hold it to that dia. and also solder on 6 spokes, plus the pole through the center. I have an idea for a fixture to hold it all together and solder it.
I drew up the antenna in my CAD program ran it through my G-code generator and engraved a piece of aluminium. Not pleased with the outcome. This was the first time I tried using the CNC to mill a circle. I don't like the slightly out of round appearance. Would make for a poor looking antenna.



Also kind of rough using both a "V" groove cutter and then a ball nose cutter.

So what next? Mill the top off to get a nice clean surface and try again.



Time to try out the rotary table. I spend a few hours hand writing code. Dry ran the machine. Looks good. Not going to use a cutter this time. Going to try my carbide scriber I made for engraving walls for a TT scale brass caboose. It gave a perfect circle, but the six legs of the antenna didn't seem to start at the exact center.



Here's how big the jig is. That's a piece of .010" phosphor bronze wire. Once I get the six legs started from center I'll make some small clamps to hold everything together for soldering.



I zeroed in the rotary table perfectly under the spindle center. It now produces a perfect circle.



Next is developing the tiny clamps that will be needed to hold the wires down for soldering.
Had a bit of a set back with the jig. When I went to center punch the jig I inadvertently missed getting it dead center where the spokes meet in the middle. What to do? Re-scribe the jig that's what. In case you'd like to see how I made the holding jig I did a little video. It's speeded up to 4 times of actual speed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=weY4Hq67ycU

I finally was brave enough to drill a .0225" hole through the 1/4" thick aluminum jig. It was done manually with an Archimedes Drill. What is that? Here's a picture of one.



So here's the hole in the jig, plus a penny for size comparison.



And if you don't believe me here's the drill sticking through the jig. It took about 10 minutes to drill through and I only used one drill.



Next up is making the tiny clamps to hold the wire down for soldering.
I came up with small clamps to hold down the wire. Using .010" (.25mm) piano wire I made three tiny clamps to hold down the circle of phosphor bronze wire.



Next I cut six pieces of wire to a length of .140" (3.556mm) long for the spokes. Flux was smeared on were the wires will be soldered to and tiny slivers of solder were added



Here comes the fun part. Soldering all those parts together. Easy to do. I set the jig on a bigger piece of aluminum and then that was set on a gas stove burner. At the highest setting it only took a few minutes to heat both plates to melt the solder.



A quick run under some cold water and this is the end result. Not 100% but it proves out the jig works.



I can think of one reason not all six spokes soldered, the wire wasn't clean enough. Also when I drilled the .0225" (.5715mm) hole through the center it didn't drill straight though. The slanted hole has nothing to do with the soldering job. Now that I have prove of concept I'm going to make another jig, hopefully with a straight hole through the center.
Well here you go. Third try was the lucky charm.



I cleaned the phosphor bronze wire using a piece of emery paper. Proof positive that clean parts solder much better and neater.

Now on to making the "perfect jig" with a straight hole through the center. WHY? Here's why.



Ill take a picture when the final good antenna is made.

Bernd


A PESSIMIST sees a dark tunnel
An OPTIMIST sees light at the end of the tunnel
A REALIST sees a freight train
The LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER sees three idiots standing on the tracks

Country: USA | Posts: 2299 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 09/15/2017 :  10:54:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What a work out Bernd'...That is some very intricate work'...


Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 5049 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 09/16/2017 :  08:59:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow, Bernd! Very impressive amount of work. Your persistence paid off, looks great!


Country: USA | Posts: 1917 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 09/16/2017 :  09:21:12 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bernd,

Wow. So much work for such small details.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 2953 Go to Top of Page

Guff
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 09/16/2017 :  10:01:00 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bernd,
Now that's persistence! Great job on a piece that is hard to even see. You are a craftsman.
Dave



Country: USA | Posts: 1198 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/16/2017 :  1:31:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very interesting to see how you sorted through all the problems. Thanks for taking the time to show us how you made the antenna.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14120 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Crew Chief



Posted - 09/16/2017 :  2:47:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Amazing!
Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 648 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 09/16/2017 :  8:00:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the nice words guys. I'm hoping some ideas may have rubbed off. That's one purpose of posting projects like this. Having a machining background helps with getting to a finished part. This was the best method of making a one of part for a fellow modeler. I also like posting the failures along with the successes to show that you made need to try another path to get to your end result.

This can be scale dup to other scales now that the process has been perfected.

Bernd


A PESSIMIST sees a dark tunnel
An OPTIMIST sees light at the end of the tunnel
A REALIST sees a freight train
The LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER sees three idiots standing on the tracks

Country: USA | Posts: 2299 Go to Top of Page

ed k
Crew Chief

Posted - 09/16/2017 :  11:58:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dude, That's just showing off. I agree you are amazing. Such talent. You don't get that good over night.
ed



Country: USA | Posts: 851 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 09/17/2017 :  08:17:05 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ed k

Dude, That's just showing off. I agree you are amazing. Such talent. You don't get that good over night.
ed



Thanks Ed.


A PESSIMIST sees a dark tunnel
An OPTIMIST sees light at the end of the tunnel
A REALIST sees a freight train
The LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER sees three idiots standing on the tracks

Country: USA | Posts: 2299 Go to Top of Page

k9wrangler
Fireman



Posted - 09/17/2017 :  09:47:24 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The intricacy and patience makes my neck hurt....

I'm impressed and appreciate seeing your work.


Stand UP for AMERICA!!

Karl Scribner
Kentucky Southern Railway
Sunfield Township Michigan

Edited by - k9wrangler on 09/17/2017 09:49:05 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 8888 Go to Top of Page

CavalryTrooper25
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/20/2017 :  09:31:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
WOW, this is really cool.

Wish I had this skill!

Oh well, my skills lay elsewhere.

Horse




Country: | Posts: 487 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 09/20/2017 :  5:35:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by k9wrangler

The intricacy and patience makes my neck hurt....

I'm impressed and appreciate seeing your work.



Thanks Karl. I enjoy this type of work.

Bernd


A PESSIMIST sees a dark tunnel
An OPTIMIST sees light at the end of the tunnel
A REALIST sees a freight train
The LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER sees three idiots standing on the tracks

Country: USA | Posts: 2299 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 09/20/2017 :  5:36:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by CavalryTrooper25

WOW, this is really cool.

Wish I had this skill!

Oh well, my skills lay elsewhere.

Horse





Thanks Horse. You can learn those skills. Just takes a bit of time.

Bernd


A PESSIMIST sees a dark tunnel
An OPTIMIST sees light at the end of the tunnel
A REALIST sees a freight train
The LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER sees three idiots standing on the tracks

Country: USA | Posts: 2299 Go to Top of Page

tct855
Engine Wiper



Posted - 09/23/2017 :  3:05:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit tct855's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Big Bern-,

Sherline lathe not impressive at all, waste of good billet material, end result of wasted time-wire bronze-solder, the pictures left so much to be desired.

Crap! Crap! Crap!

The above are things that don't apply to you boss! at all...

That class was so damn cool. I had to keep telling myself, this was for TT scale?

I see something like this done & it motivates me to finish off a N-scale berkshire loco I have.

Amazing. You are a true craftsman! Thanks for taking the time to demonstrate & teach (even the mistakes).

That unto itself speaks volumes of the character you possess.

Question: You said you were asked for plastic injection mold test right? For that size would a brass wire or brass etching be a better choice for your modeler friend?

No rivet counting hrere, just curious inquiry. Thanx Thom...



Edited by - tct855 on 09/23/2017 3:07:38 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 362 Go to Top of Page
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