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Author Previous Topic: Finescale Modeling: What is it? Topic Next Topic: Review of Cedarhill Designs kits
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Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 11/03/2017 :  5:09:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ed k

Tony, we are speaking the same language. Different wordage. The full name is pastel chalk sticks. I am used to Brett (SWMW) calling them chalks. The differences in color of the raw umber is as you said, light tan to near black. I used a cabbage shredder to make the powder and put then in little bead containers. Each container has 7 small storage units. Nice way to keep them. One stick makes quite a bit of powder. I can be more specific as to who makes the containers, if anyone has interest.
ed



Ed, I too have a plastic container to store my pastels, see page 4 of this thread. I usually only scrape what I need with a razor blade, as sometimes I just paint (so to speak) with the pastel, and use alcohol to blend in the pastel colors.

I don't know why Brett calls them chalks, as these are not really chalks. It's a different type of stick. We aren't trying to belittle you, and please don't be offended, it's ok if someone calls them chalks, however, I believe if your starting out in the hobby, that can be very misleading or confusing, as the correct name is pastels (for our purposes). I don't believe chalks, for Brett's and our models, will work the same, but not having tried them, I can't really say. I don't have any chalks except one packet I bought in a 5 and dime store, and they are used in sidewalk paintings. I bought these to see if I can color plaster before or after it is mixed and dried.

But, technically, chalk is not pastel. Chalk is made of limestone or gypsum and compressed into powdered sticks.
Soft pastels are made from pure mineral pigments. The same pigments are used in oil paint, acrylics, and water color. The difference is in the type of binder used. I am not sure what the binder is in the chalk pastels. Rembrandt doesn't make chalk pastels. neither does Sennelier, which I also use. They have a little more variety of colors than Rembrandt, and work the same way.

But, if I were new to this hobby, and was looking for chalk sticks, or chalk pastels, I might feel frustrated, as what I should be looking for is the soft pastel. And for that reason, I prefer to use the correct name for the product we are using.

I find the same confusion when I had bought Sculpy, there are other brands, and Sculpy is a brand name, not a material name, so I have been confused as to whether or not the others are the same. Still don't know, for sure, but I assume they are the same.

This has been an interesting discussion, despite the confusion, as I truly didn't know chalk pastels even existed, I thought that some just used that term because they looked like chalk. But I think we can all put this one to rest. I'll still use Pastel as that is what they actually are, but that is just me, I have a thing about correctness.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2813 Go to Top of Page

ed k
Fireman

Posted - 11/03/2017 :  6:33:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello Tony. Very well written. Having owned 98% of Brett's kits (sold all HO) and in reading all the Construction Manual's I saw the word hundreds off times. Also in his Video and forum threads. So I have always used it. As I now find out, incorrectly. Well wait till I speak with Brett. I try my best to be accurate (often failing), as I realize the importance.
I know Brett feels the Rembrandt are the purest (hope that is the correct word).
This has gathered as much attention as nail heads in HO. Well almost.
Tony, Please do me a favor. Correct me whenever need. This may be a part time job, but I feel you are up to the task. If you don't, my dear friend Carl Laskey will.
Thank you
ed



Country: USA | Posts: 1091 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 11/03/2017 :  8:37:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ed k

Hello Tony. Very well written. Having owned 98% of Brett's kits (sold all HO) and in reading all the Construction Manual's I saw the word hundreds off times. Also in his Video and forum threads. So I have always used it. As I now find out, incorrectly. Well wait till I speak with Brett. I try my best to be accurate (often failing), as I realize the importance.
I know Brett feels the Rembrandt are the purest (hope that is the correct word).
This has gathered as much attention as nail heads in HO. Well almost.
Tony, Please do me a favor. Correct me whenever need. This may be a part time job, but I feel you are up to the task. If you don't, my dear friend Carl Laskey will.
Thank you
ed


Your quite the humorist, I see. Thank you for saying what you did. I also think Rembrandt's are the purist, with Sennelier a very close second, but I am sure many will disagree with that. Everyone has their own favorites and opinions.

So you remember my tread on nail heads. Funny, I had just re-visited that last week. Nothing new added. I also hadn't gotten around to trying that out, with the fine lead, maybe I will on this model. It deserves some attention.

And, now, I imagine others here are probably wondering what the heck we're talking about. So maybe I'll be able to present a section on just that.

Thanks again,


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2813 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 11/05/2017 :  12:56:22 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2EuYqj_0Uk

In ref. to the above uTube video link, it was the most informative description I have ever seen. Since I want to add multiple lights to my model, I wanted a parallel circuit, but wasn't sure about the power supply requirements. Now I know that, put simply, the more LED lights I add in parallel, the more current will be used and the battery will run out sooner. That's what I needed to know, and NOW it all makes sense. The light bulb just came on.

Since LED lights will use up a lot less resistance than normal filament bulbs, the amperage will be lower (or the amount of juice coming from the battery), so obviously, the battery will last longer with LED's than normal bulbs. Sure, it will run out faster using say 8 LED's rather than 2, but still at a lower rate, so the battery shouldn't run out that often.

But my BIG question is this:, how soon would the battery run out? I can assume using more batteries with a resitor to cut the current down to power the LED's with the correct voltage would increase the longevity of the batteries. So I went to Evan Designs ModelTrainSoftware that sells LED's and switches etc., and they say their 4 bulb set with a 3 volt battery would last about 7 hours. I will be using 9 volt batteries, and 7-19 volt LED's. Going by that, as a rough estimate, they shuld last at least 21 hours. Being I won't have them on for long periods anyway, they will last quite a long time, I think.

I plan on using 8 inside the building and 4 nano size LED's outside over the doors. I had ordered 40 Angled Vintage Lampshades from Shapeways for the outdoor lights, and will either leave the inside ones open, or make my own shades. I'm also adding 3 lights to the inspection pit. We'll see how that goes.

OK, they are done (I wrote this ahead of time as the internet sometimes drops on me). Added 3 LED's at 6 volt ea. I think it is a great start to the lighting of the model. Looking at the lights straight on, they are pretty bright. But in low-light conditions, they are not too bad at all.









The N&W SW1 is a fun "what-if" project I did years ago. I just like the way it looks.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2813 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 11/05/2017 :  4:39:56 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I buy several details of Shapeways, the 3-D printing service. Here is a shot of a desk (one of three in the set) and a few chairs. I cleaned them up and painted with a brush a mahogany color from Vallejo. I like the detail. The cubby holes go all the way back. When I'm done, most of these will be filled with paper and envelopes.

Also, just ordered a few figures, shown here at the request of a friend. A wagon driver, sleeping moonshine man, a set of mechanics (?) and a German Shepard. These will be going on the model somewhere. Makes a nice change from the Preiser and other most often familiar figures.







Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2813 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 11/05/2017 :  6:32:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Lighting looks great Tony!

Angled Vintage Lampshades from Shapeways

If you could, please show these once you receive them..



Country: USA | Posts: 2649 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 11/05/2017 :  8:31:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Carl B

Lighting looks great Tony!

Angled Vintage Lampshades from Shapeways

If you could, please show these once you receive them..



I will most certainly do that, Carl. This is the page in question:

https://www.shapeways.com/product/Y2PHSKJD6/angled-vintage-lampshades-ho-scale-x40?option=57457086&etId=168567306&utm_source=automated-contact&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=payment-received&utm_content=3

and this is what they look like.





Hope this helps for now.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2813 Go to Top of Page

BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/05/2017 :  10:24:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Nelson458

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2EuYqj_0Uk

In ref. to the above uTube video link, it was the most informative description I have ever seen. Since I want to add multiple lights to my model, I wanted a parallel circuit, but wasn't sure about the power supply requirements. Now I know that, put simply, the more LED lights I add in parallel, the more current will be used and the battery will run out sooner. That's what I needed to know, and NOW it all makes sense. The light bulb just came on.

Since LED lights will use up a lot less resistance than normal filament bulbs, the amperage will be lower (or the amount of juice coming from the battery), so obviously, the battery will last longer with LED's than normal bulbs. Sure, it will run out faster using say 8 LED's rather than 2, but still at a lower rate, so the battery shouldn't run out that often.

But my BIG question is this:, how soon would the battery run out? I can assume using more batteries with a resitor to cut the current down to power the LED's with the correct voltage would increase the longevity of the batteries. So I went to Evan Designs ModelTrainSoftware that sells LED's and switches etc., and they say their 4 bulb set with a 3 volt battery would last about 7 hours. I will be using 9 volt batteries, and 7-19 volt LED's. Going by that, as a rough estimate, they shuld last at least 21 hours. Being I won't have them on for long periods anyway, they will last quite a long time, I think.

I plan on using 8 inside the building and 4 nano size LED's outside over the doors. I had ordered 40 Angled Vintage Lampshades from Shapeways for the outdoor lights, and will either leave the inside ones open, or make my own shades. I'm also adding 3 lights to the inspection pit. We'll see how that goes.

OK, they are done (I wrote this ahead of time as the internet sometimes drops on me). Added 3 LED's at 6 volt ea. I think it is a great start to the lighting of the model. Looking at the lights straight on, they are pretty bright. But in low-light conditions, they are not too bad at all.









The N&W SW1 is a fun "what-if" project I did years ago. I just like the way it looks.



Tony,

Here's all you need....I is current, E is voltage, R is resistance, and P is Power.

I = E/R E=I*R R=E/I P=I*E P=I squared * R

RTotal = R1 + R2 + R3 + Rn resistance in series.
RTotal = 1 / (1/R1 + 1/R2 + 1/R3 + 1/Rn) resistance in parallel.

Simple calculations that will answer your battery question. If your battery is say 1 amp hour rated. You can figure that with a good safety margin, a load (current) of 800 milliamps (.8 amps) would run an hour.

Jim

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 2963 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/05/2017 :  10:46:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony,
Thanks for posting the pictures of the shapeways items.

And Burley Jim, thanks for clarifying what is needed for lighting. These may be of full use to someone who knows what to do automatically, but to someone like me, I will need to pay attention in class. I hope to get a seat in front.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 3286 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/05/2017 :  11:53:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony looks great. Those pit lights great idea.

Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 10083 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 11/06/2017 :  4:22:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Jim. I have, even with formulas, the hardest time with electronics. And in the past I have done things like build radios, from scratch. Even sold some.

Rich, your welcome.

Jerry, I thought so too. I did it mainly because if someone looks in there after it's all done with, and the roof is removed, the area was too dark to see anything much, and may be missed.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2813 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 11/06/2017 :  5:27:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I've been a thinkin. I was going to put an office in the corner of the building, but looking over tons (or what seems like) of photos for ideas, there doesn't seem to be an office in an engine shed or a roundhouse. So I thought I would build the office as a small building just off site, and in that vacant area where the office was going to go, I thought about adding a few machines. Now that seems a little more like the way it should be.

Any thoughts???? Please...


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2813 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/06/2017 :  7:46:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's one that Chuck Doan did in his Enginehouse/repair shop.
Maybe that helps.


https://images57.fotki.com/v80/photos/7/777399/2863871/DSCF3990crop3A-vi.jpg


Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Edited by - TRAINS1941 on 11/06/2017 7:47:55 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 10083 Go to Top of Page

adrian_batey
Fireman

Posted - 11/06/2017 :  11:14:31 PM  Show Profile  Visit adrian_batey's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tony, I love the SW1. Looks like a great logging loco project. Care to share some more pics of it over in the diesel shop?

Modeling the Northern Pacific Yacolt Branch
https://yacoltbranch.blogspot.com.au/

Country: Australia | Posts: 1257 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 11/07/2017 :  3:55:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by TRAINS1941

Here's one that Chuck Doan did in his Enginehouse/repair shop.
Maybe that helps.

https://images57.fotki.com/v80/photos/7/777399/2863871/DSCF3990crop3A-vi.jpg


Thanks Jerry. Yes, I had seen this one before, and oddly enough, was in my head last night as my mind was thinking about other possibilities.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2813 Go to Top of Page
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