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Author Previous Topic: My first attempt at Digital Bricks Topic Next Topic: Tenement Row by Smallshaw
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David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 10/21/2017 :  6:19:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony, Thanks for clearing that up.
Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1085 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 10/21/2017 :  6:54:36 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Well, this is frustrating, all of a sudden after a long written passage here, I got a message saying "internet connection not working", and erased everything. I hate that, so I am doing it on 'word' first, now.

Now to try and remember what I wrote, or most of it.

The flooring was started by drawing a plan on some 94lb A3 white artists paper, this one by Fabriano. It is 100% recycled paper, and although not designed (I would think) for watercolors, artists paper is generally more resistant to water than normal paper, so is less likely to shrink or warp. I would imagine that any good watercolor paper could also be used.



First, I very carefully, and as accurately as I could, glued down some 6x6 stripwood. These are what the rails will lay upon. The top of the stripwood has to be the same as the top of the ties used outside the shed, so the bottom of the rail will seamlessly blend in. Since the ties are about .085" (I think, if I remember right) thick, and the paper is .025" thick, they come out to be the same. The whole base was also raised above the layout to match the cork roadbed height, or thickness.

What I did to help in spacing was to take a plastic track gauge and widen the ends a little to accept the 6x6 stripwood, keeping the inside the same.





After all is done, this is how it looked. I didn't take any shots while I did the rest of the flooring, but I think you'll get the idea.





I glued some 1/2" insulation foam to some MDF I had cut to size, and cut an equal opening in my 2" layout foam, added some spacers (cork roadbed first [the side was right] and more 1/2" insulation) and a notch to get my finger in to lift it out if needed.

The floor will be glued on the foam of the MDF/foam base. I also cut out a section for the inspection pit ahead of time.








Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2956 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 10/21/2017 :  7:16:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David Clark

Tony, Thanks for clearing that up.
Cheers,
Dave



No problem, my friend.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2956 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 10/29/2017 :  12:16:53 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I have finished the inspection pit, although I am thinking about adding a couple of lights to the inside of it. I plan on doing so for the building, so I might as well get my feet wet.

The pit was made by cutting some 1/8" balsa wood I had in my scrap bin for years, to the dimensions of the pit, then added some stripwood to the sides.

The base for the floor was the same 'cardstock' material I used to glue the main floor to, then glued down some stripwood I had left over from another kit (Sierra West kit of a similar model, actually), which is the same stripwood I used for the sides. As it happened, and it doesn't happen that often, the total of the widths of the stripwood was the exact size of the width of the pit floor.

From there, I weathered the wood even more using pastel chalks, and used Rusty Stumps steps to the ends. I added some 6" sq. wood on the sides to both hold the wood in place, and support the rails above. I should have done this next step before I glued the floor in, wasn't thinking, but I used a Vector Cut grating material to make a square drain, and had to cut a square hole from inside the pit. Tight quarters, but I managed.

Some of the details come from Shapeways; the welding cart and oil bottles, tools from Vector Cut (I think these ones were O scale, but they looked like they fit the scene better), the short ladder is from Rusty Stumps, a valve from PSC, a brass casting, the hose is .015" diameter solder, painted green, and hooks are bronze wire from Ticky Train. The chain is from Builders in Scale. A little larger link than I normally use, but the larger chain just looked better. A broom, step stool (station platform step stool) and barrel are from SSLtd. I think that's it. The two shelves are leftover weathered stripwood supported by the same wood. The shelves are an inch long, the supports are cut to 1/4" long (or high), which was then cut from corner to corner to create 2 triangle pieces.

At this point, the main shed floor and pit is glued down and weighted with steel weights until dry.

I also wanted to give credit to Ken Karns for doing a similar pit in his model of the Sierra West engine shed. Because of his tremendous skill at detail, he has been quite an inspiration to me, so thank you Ken.




























Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Edited by - Nelson458 on 10/29/2017 12:20:02 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 2956 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/29/2017 :  12:40:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice. Very nice indeed!

Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 10596 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/29/2017 :  2:59:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony,
I have been following along with your progress and have been picking up a few tips to use on my current project. I'm making a engine shed for my critter engine that now is running. Your modeling and your sharing is well advanced.
Thanks
Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 3517 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 10/29/2017 :  3:20:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nicely done Tony, Thanks for sharing the How-to.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4687 Go to Top of Page

ed k
Fireman

Posted - 10/29/2017 :  5:44:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well done Tony.
ed



Country: USA | Posts: 1091 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 10/29/2017 :  8:25:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Jerry, Rich, Bob and Ed. Thank you all and Rich, Bob, your very welcome.

Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2956 Go to Top of Page

Guff
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/29/2017 :  10:16:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony,
Your modeling skills are incredible. Love the look of the floor.
Dave



Country: USA | Posts: 1480 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 10/30/2017 :  07:57:08 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tony,

What great work. There are so many ideas on this page I might just have to print it out for the files.

I wouldn't even know where to start on furnishing a pit. (Poe me, I expected to see a pendulum.) You've given me a lot of suggestions.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 3945 Go to Top of Page

Philip
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 10/30/2017 :  09:23:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice!

Philip



Country: USA | Posts: 2423 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 10/30/2017 :  10:27:43 AM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Looks great Tony!


Country: USA | Posts: 2879 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 10/30/2017 :  11:44:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great looking inspection pit, and weathered and detailed outstandingly.


Country: USA | Posts: 17278 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 10/30/2017 :  4:42:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,
Thank you. I used mostly artists soft pastels by Rembrandt.

Mike,
Thank you. And I don't want you to be disappointed, so....


Philip and Carl, thank you, appreciate it.

And Louis, thank you, I am glad you approve.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2956 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 30 Previous Topic: My first attempt at Digital Bricks Topic Next Topic: Tenement Row by Smallshaw  
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