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 Structures on th LP&N RR, vol.4
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sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/12/2020 :  12:59:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bruce, Very nice book and you are right, many model ideas in there. I live in the southern end
of Dauphin County which as you can see on the book's map, not far from the area covered by the
book. This area is quite similar to the book.
Thanks,
Bob


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Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 02/12/2020 :  1:15:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob, well that colour of that balsa foam makes it look like a sponge toffee house.
Your off to a good start!

Greg Shinnie



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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 02/12/2020 :  2:57:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
When we bought our 1859 farmhouse there was a small approx 10í by 12í building attached to the kitchen end of our house by a short covered walkway. We always called it a milk house because there was a cement trough inside running along one wall with vents at each end and a shelf outside next to the door. I always suspected there was a well under the cement walkway. When we had a garage built and had the cement removed there was indeed a well. Reading the PA publication Iím pretty sure we were right in calling it a milk house. It was clearly built later than the house.

Obviously Iím interested in your model, Bob for several reasons.

Mike



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Ray Dunakin
Fireman



Posted - 02/13/2020 :  01:20:10 AM  Show Profile  Visit Ray Dunakin's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I'm thrilled to see you starting a new project, Bob! And I'm already learning something, as I'd never heard of a spring house before.


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sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/13/2020 :  05:00:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Greg, Mike, and Ray, thanks for your comments.

Greg - color is everything

Mike - I agree, it was a milk house by the sounds of it

Ray - the spring house was very important throughout the northern states at least, it was
the "refrigerator" for the farm.

Bob


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sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/13/2020 :  05:09:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My first job on a stone structure is to mark out the stones. This is my "stone' carving tool.



Everyone does it differently but for me the first thing to do is to mark out all the
cornerstones and the sills and lintels. That way I know I will not forget them when
fashioning the stones.



This is all easily done with hardly any pressure on the "carving" tool.

Bob


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sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/13/2020 :  05:20:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Using a fairly sharp carving tool I mark out the random stones. I do this very lightly so that I
can make changes if needed.



Once satisfied I go over all the lines a bit deeper and wider. Again, no pressure is required
as the balsa foam is so soft. Just the going
over the lines starts to soften up each line and make the stones stand out.
At this stage I am rounding corners off and taking the sharp edge off the stones.

Bob


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Edited by - sgtbob on 02/13/2020 05:26:04 AM

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Guff
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/13/2020 :  06:25:27 AM  Show Profile  Send Guff an AOL message  Reply with Quote
The old pencil carving tool...Nice!

David Guffey

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Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 02/13/2020 :  08:00:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob, well that colour of that balsa foam makes it look like a sponge... Your off to a good start! Greg Shinnie
Is that a Sponge Bob joke sneaking in there? :)



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Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 02/13/2020 :  08:13:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Gill

Bob, well that colour of that balsa foam makes it look like a sponge... Your off to a good start! Greg Shinnie
Is that a Sponge Bob joke sneaking in there? :)



Bill, that's "Sponge Toffee Bob", the best balsa foam pencil carver on the seven seas!

Greg



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sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/13/2020 :  3:20:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for your posts Dave, Bill,and Greg,

Ray, you got me thinking about springhouses. They were very important to the pre-electric
farm as a place to store foods or anything that had to be kept cold. Since they were
important and you had to locate a spring first, they were often the first structure to
be built on the farm.

Another interesting one was the icehouse. Ice was cut from a lake or river in the winter
and stored in the icehouse (usually partly or mostly underground), insulated with hay or
sawdust, and supplied ice all trough the summer until the next winter. Ice was used to
preserve food and also to make cold drinks or ice cream, etc. Some New Englanders made a
fortune shipping ice in insulated ships to the south and the islands.

Talk about the good old days!!

Bob


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Edited by - sgtbob on 02/13/2020 3:23:06 PM

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Terrell
Fireman

Posted - 02/13/2020 :  4:11:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Why didn't they just go to Walmart for the ice? That's where I get mine.

Looking great, Bob!



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Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 02/13/2020 :  11:38:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Some New Englanders made a fortune shipping ice in insulated ships to the south and the islands. Sgt Bob

Back when I worked at Mystic Seaport one of the curators told me that the pond in the woods not too far from where I live and have ice skated with family and friends was an ice pond. The pond has mostly silted up and is very shallow now but there are springs beneath it in several places.

There may be a couple photos of men cutting blocks of ice from that exact pond. There are the remains of a small stone dam and next to it was, they say, a stone ice house.

BUT... the biggest surprise was when he told me at some point ice from that pond had been packed in sawdust on Mystic built clipper ships and sent to India!
(I know sawdust and straw are really good insulators, but going that far you'd think: leave with an iceberg, arrive with an icecube.



Edited by - Bill Gill on 02/13/2020 11:41:13 PM

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sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/14/2020 :  07:58:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The next step is to simply go over all your mortar lines with the pencil, letting the pencil
angle a bit to round off the edges of each stone. If need be you can also create some new
smaller stones. The idea is to remove the sharp edges and any pointy corners of each stone.





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sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/14/2020 :  08:14:28 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Go over the mortar lines one more time aiming to get rid of any sharp edges of each stone and any
pointy corners. You can also turn the pencil around to drag the eraser across the some stones
to give them a bit of surface detail, not much needed there.



Bob


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