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Author Previous Topic: So I wanted to make white decals... Topic Next Topic: sterling model trees
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ocalicreek
Engine Wiper

Posted - 06/14/2017 :  1:10:37 PM  Show Profile  Visit ocalicreek's Homepage  Reply with Quote


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The tower prior to painting. The railings are 1/32" stock for the uprights (from the kit) and scale 1x4 and 2x2 (from my supplies) for the railings. I decided that would lend a more finescale look to the whole kit.

I forgot to mask the little roof over the chute before painting the entire structure "Rust-oleum Painter's Touch 2X ULTRA Cover Paint+Primer Satin Dark Walnut (Also bonds to Plastic!)" I love this paint. It claims to be fast drying, and it is dry to the touch within 15 minutes or so, but still tacky. I like to wait until I can't smell the paint aroma before adding any other treatments like weathering or even masking. However this time I applied a black chalk wash a day later with no ill effects. I will post pictures of the painted structure later.

Galen


My Train Blog: http://ocalicreek.blogspot.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 490 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 06/14/2017 :  11:37:03 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Galen,

Looks great! Good substitution on the stairway components. I think many kit manufacturers make their stair railings etc too thick. Your mods are a real improvement.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 3958 Go to Top of Page

ocalicreek
Engine Wiper

Posted - 06/15/2017 :  2:39:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit ocalicreek's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Mike. I agree that many manufacturers make the railings and other "fine" parts too thick. Perhaps this is a concession to making them more durable, or to the molding/casting process? Regardless, it is a simple substitution that, in my opinion, can elevate a basic kit. Kinda like adding aftermarket grab irons and sill steps to a basic freight car kit, it can give the illusion that the whole thing is more detailed than it is. Of course, I also think it can be a mistake if the finescale details are obviously the only thing on the kit that detailed and are a drastic departure from the other materials. But in this case I like it and really think it works.

Painting is complete, and this morning I epoxied into the base a pair of homemade solder pads for the lighting. The end is in sight!

Galen


My Train Blog: http://ocalicreek.blogspot.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 490 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/15/2017 :  3:40:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Galen, can you be so kind as to share some photos and construction information on your process to provide lighting to the project? Thanks in advance.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7124 Go to Top of Page

ocalicreek
Engine Wiper

Posted - 06/15/2017 :  5:28:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit ocalicreek's Homepage  Reply with Quote
KP - will do.

Galen


My Train Blog: http://ocalicreek.blogspot.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 490 Go to Top of Page

ocalicreek
Engine Wiper

Posted - 06/23/2017 :  7:25:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit ocalicreek's Homepage  Reply with Quote
KP, et al, here is the first set of images and explanation for how I am adding lighting to the tower. More to come as I get to that part. For now, though, I have only gone this far and I will do more with the weathering before I add the lights themselves.



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I use PC board to make a small solder tab. I cut off a strip of PC board then I cut the gap with a hobby knife and enlarge it with a small triangle file. For this building I made two small tabs with two pads each.

I had already glued the spacer in the base of the tower. This was to both prevent the wall from bowing in, and provide a place for the solder pads. The pads are epoxied in place.

The wires you see are only there because I was test fitting the lights. As I said above, I will be doing more weathering and finishing work , including preparing the base, before going any further with the wiring.

Galen


My Train Blog: http://ocalicreek.blogspot.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 490 Go to Top of Page

ocalicreek
Engine Wiper

Posted - 06/23/2017 :  8:31:12 PM  Show Profile  Visit ocalicreek's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I had to adjust the color of these images in GIMP...the tower looks much more black in person. The base color is several light coats of Krylon Dark Walnut, as mentioned in a previous post. Then I washed the whole thing twice with a black chalk wash and sealed with Matte sealer. Though I like the color after this, it was still too even. So I looked around and found a few b&w images of wooden coal towers and the color/tone variation among individual clapboards was quite visible.

To emulate this I chose a gray colored pencil from a children's art set (the cheap kind from the big box stores, that has water color, felt pens, crayons, a little bit of everything, etc.) I highlighted several boards, then scrubbed the color into the wood with a stiff bristled brush. From a distance this gives the variation I'm after, as well as giving the whole tower more of a silvery, weathered gray tone.

Before:



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After:



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Hopefully the true color will show better under natural light. We are suffering with the 100+ heatwave, even here in Northern California, so I am loathe to get outside for too long, but for the sake of a few good model shots, maybe I will...

Galen


My Train Blog: http://ocalicreek.blogspot.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 490 Go to Top of Page

ed k
Fireman

Posted - 06/23/2017 :  11:53:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sweet difference. Mid 90's with unforgiving humidity in Florida. Hydrate or you are in serious trouble.
Nice modeling dude.
ed



Country: USA | Posts: 1091 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 06/24/2017 :  09:14:55 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Galen,

Good use of materials you have on hand; you achieved a nice variation in color. We have one of those art sets; maybe I should take a look inside!

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 3958 Go to Top of Page

ocalicreek
Engine Wiper

Posted - 06/24/2017 :  10:17:41 AM  Show Profile  Visit ocalicreek's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Ed - I grew up in Ocala, so I remember the humidity. Hydration is key. I'd be okay letting my lawn dry up and go brown but we rent so I increased the sprinkler timer from 20 minutes per zone every third day to 25 minutes per zone every day. It has not dried up yet, but it isn't pretty and green all over. Really, I'd do without a lawn and grow food, but that's not possible yet.

Mike - the art set is one a neighbor gave my oldest son, who is the artist in our family (along with my crafty wife and myself). He never really used it and was fine letting me have it. He can still use it any time, naturally, but right now most of his creativity is channeled through Minecraft or Planet Coaster. One good data crash and he may return to the hands-on arts...

I installed window glass and windows yesterday, using a technique I learned watching Martin build Weltyk Marine. Photos later.

Galen


My Train Blog: http://ocalicreek.blogspot.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 490 Go to Top of Page

ocalicreek
Engine Wiper

Posted - 06/28/2017 :  10:50:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit ocalicreek's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Not much to report, but I did get the base plate cut from tempered hardboard and will be working on wiring next.

Galen


My Train Blog: http://ocalicreek.blogspot.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 490 Go to Top of Page

ocalicreek
Engine Wiper

Posted - 07/02/2017 :  1:34:34 PM  Show Profile  Visit ocalicreek's Homepage  Reply with Quote


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I used these gooseneck lamps from the eBay seller "WEHONEST". The shades and gooseneck mount are a bit thick compared to products from NGineering or something a person could make themselves, but this product is inexpensive and I didn't have to fiddle with wiring itty bitty LEDs...not my thing. I did improve the light by painting the underside white, and I will be brushing on dullcote then applying a little chalk dust later.



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Since the lights come prewired with a resistor, and the resistor didn't fit through the mounting hole, I had to cut it off and re-attach.



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I tinned 22 awg stranded wire and soldered it to the pads where I had already soldered the wires (plus resistor) from the lamps.



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This is the distributor board from WEHONEST. The power supply is from the same seller and is rated to match the distributor, though you could probably find your own and the board comes with options for various power sources.

I will post pictures of the lights on in a dark setting once the building is complete. Up next I will be attaching the structure to the base, then joining the buildings with the shaft from the power house and adding the final details to the chute assembly.

Galen



My Train Blog: http://ocalicreek.blogspot.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 490 Go to Top of Page

ocalicreek
Engine Wiper

Posted - 11/28/2017 :  6:36:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit ocalicreek's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Was it really July when I last posted? Dadgum, time flies. Took a break for a while with summer activities, kids going back to school, and the whole family going to WDW for two weeks in October, then Thanksgiving at the inlaws, and now I'm back.

I decided to push through and finish this thing so that I could get back to a long-put-off loco project in time to run it under the tree at Christmas...right around the corner!

Here are some pictures of the chute area, missing the pull-down-chain under the apron that I added this afternoon.



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The 'bail' wire with the loop on the end is very small (not sure what size) bronze wire soldered to a flat stock wishbone-shaped piece that gets glued to the slice gate. I substituted wire for the string suggested as cable, and chain in places where it appeared in the prototype photos on the instruction sheet. The lead ball weights are the kit-supplied black beads CA'd to the wire, painted with a black/silver/graphite mix.

I realized too late that my apron was too wide, so the weights and their lines don't hang down completely vertically from the pulleys. I could have moved the pulleys out but that would have risked damaging the pulley roof and would have probably required a rebuild on that part altogether. At this point I decided to live with the kink. At three feet it isn't noticeable.

These close shots do show the nbw detail to good effect. Thanks for encouraging me to apply them!

All that remains is to apply a little touch-up paint to a few details and maybe a dab of weathering, then stage a few night shots to showcase the lighting.

Galen



My Train Blog: http://ocalicreek.blogspot.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 490 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/29/2017 :  09:54:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's a link to the instruction page for that LED Distribution board: http://stores.ebay.com/WEHONEST/InstructionOfPowerDistributionBoard.html (Note the eBay seller name is wehonest_cn, I had to search a bit to find them.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7094 Go to Top of Page

ocalicreek
Engine Wiper

Posted - 11/29/2017 :  12:28:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit ocalicreek's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Dave, that's the one. If you can stand the wait it is worth the cost for what it can do. It seems to be a little more versatile than the Woodland Scenics Just Plug in how it receives power and how it accepts a variety of plug types, except that each light can't be dimmed individually. That's fine by me for now.

The gooseneck lamps aren't as "finescale" as something you might make yourself from Ngineering, but I think they look fine enough for how they're used here.

Galen


My Train Blog: http://ocalicreek.blogspot.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 490 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 2 Previous Topic: So I wanted to make white decals... Topic Next Topic: sterling model trees  
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