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 Lous Logging High Wheel Build
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desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/21/2017 :  10:53:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Logging High Wheels or as they were also called - Big wheels, logging wheels, logger wheels, lumbering wheels, bummer carts, katydids, caralog, or nibs were a specially designed large set of wooden wagon wheels that could carry logs that were up to 100 feet in length, and several at a time.
Prior to the 1870's, logging was performed by the grueling process of dragging logs from the woods with bull, horses, or oxen teams. In 1875, Silas Overpak of Manistee, Michigan, introduced a wheeled device from which logs could be suspended, making the work of bulls, horses or Oxen greatly easier in moving logs to mills or landings.
The logging wheels date back as far as the 1870s, and some say even long before that time frame. At the request of a farmer from Michigan that was then one of the nation's leading producer of lumber, who had found they were useful for logging over softer terrain, had these built for his use by Silas.
The sizes of these big wheels were made and sold from 7 (2.1336 m) thru 10 feet (3.048 m) high, and 8 (0.2032 m) to 12 (0.3048 m) wide to keep them from sinking into the mud or soft soil, they cost $100 per diameter foot, a quite considerable investment for the time. Unlike a wagon which carries a load above its axle, these huge wheels carried logs chained beneath the axle. The logs were held by a chain that suspended the logs' weight from the wheel axle, creating a stabilizing, low center of gravity. The wheels could carry logs from 12 feet (3.66 m) to 100 feet (30 m) in length, and enough logs to total 1,000 to 2,000 board feet of lumber in a single load. The axles were manufactured from hard maple, and the 16-foot tongues were made of ironwood. The wheels were clad with iron rims to protect them from stumps, fallen trees, and rocky terrain. 1 to 3 interior iron rings were used to reinforce the wooden spokes of the wheels, and also used as rub rails. These High Wheels were pulled by Horses, Oxen, or Bulls, and in later years with tractors.



If you want to make a pair of Large Scale logging wheels for your railroad consult the May/June 2012 edition of the Gazette. In that issue there is an article by Dick Whitney entitled, 1:20.3 Scale Logging High Wheels (F Scale) version, which shows you how, step by step. Much like the picture below.



You can also find a brass scratch built HO version from Scale Brass Models for Model Train Layouts Scratch built by Bruce Von Stetina, His scratch built HO version is a Brass built high wheel of a working model, of a slip tongue style, high wheel logging cart that lifts scale logs. And, it works just like the prototype. It measures 4 1/2" long x 1 7/16 tall. See views of his model on YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-usnRiZ1Kw



However, for my scratch build of an HO scale version of the Logging High wheel, Im starting out with wagon wheels that I purchased from Jim, (Forum member BurleyJim). He has a 3-D printer and has been turning out some amazing parts. These wheels measure 7 scale feet high. Large enough to appear right, without looking oversized on an HO scale layout. I will be gluing two of them together to make up a wheel 12 wide, to use on this project. As seen in the below picture I was able to simply glue two sets of wheels together, to make up each wheel for my Logging High Wheel. This gave me an instant proper sized wheel tread, and wheel spoke thickness, without having to do any sanding down or gluing any extra supports to makeup the wheel sets.
In the first split picture it shows the 6 tread thickness, and the wheel is 7 feet wide. However, the ruler angle sitting on top of the wheel, and the camera view makes it appear shorter than it actually is. The second picture shows a wheel hub on one side, and a flat surface on the other side, making it easy for me to glue two wheels back to back and get the wheel thread thickness, and the wheel spoke thickness I need for the High Wheel. The last split picture shows the two wheels held together for viewing purposes. So far we are off to a good start in my opinion.






Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 17911

David Clark
Crew Chief



Posted - 01/21/2017 :  12:27:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I remember my grandfather writing me to tell me how logging was done when he was a camp helper back in the 30's or so. I am going to try to find that letter - I know I kept it, but...
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 734 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Crew Chief



Posted - 01/21/2017 :  12:32:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Oops. My previous post seems a little random - I started typing before my brain engaged. What I meant to say was, "I am looking forward to seeing how it turns out." It's always interesting to gain information on how things were done in the past.
Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 734 Go to Top of Page

time2play
Fireman



Posted - 01/21/2017 :  2:05:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Louis, you have a terrific knack of finding unusual items and modeling them! Good for you.

Bob



Country: Canada | Posts: 1113 Go to Top of Page

teaspoon
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 01/21/2017 :  8:19:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lou, I am excited to see you doing this build, earlier this week I purchased an O scale kit to build 2 10' wheels, however it received some extensive damage in shipping, most of it to the wheels. I have given some thought to the feasibility of having wheels made on a 3D printer. More on that later. As some one who has done a bit of logging living history, the wheels are quite impressive up close. Below is a photo of myself and a group of shantyboys at the Hartwick Pines Lumbering Museum's "Evening in a Lumbercamp" a few years ago. I'm on the right, holding a "Turkey" a bag for my stuff, I was a Tramp Logger- a disgruntled ne'er do well who went from camp to camp.






Edited by - teaspoon on 01/21/2017 8:21:38 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 1074 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/21/2017 :  8:37:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, Bob and Steve thanks for your comments and following along.

Steve that is an interesting history lesson, and I'm sure a fun evening. I must admit I had to look up Tramp Logger.
Also, it is good you are following along, you can set me straight when I wonder off with bad information on this build.


Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 17911 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/21/2017 :  8:44:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The wheels have been glued together, and a 1/32" hole has been drilled half way into each of the inside hubs for mounting the axle pins, made from 3/8" long pieces of a wire nail. The gslip]tongueh that allows a cantilevered Jacob Staff (rod/lever system) to raise the logs with a chain is made-up using a piece of Evergreen square tube #253, 3/16"x 1/2" long, placed in-between the two wooden 5/32" strip wood axle pieces 5/16" long on both sides of the square tube, making up the axle for the tongue/pole to slide into, back and forth. The High Wheels worked to lift the logs when the team of horses pulled on the tongue. As the horses moved forward, the tongue slid forward and also pulled a rod and lever, rotating the chain cams and raising one end of the logs off of the ground and up against the bottom of the axle. The slip tongue/pole is made from 1/8" strip wood 4 1/2" long. Also, two axle braces were made from Evergreen styrene strips #125, .020" x .100" as seen in the picture below.





Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 17911 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/21/2017 :  10:51:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Another very interesting build from the 'Professor'..Very cool Louis'...



1/4 G 48 :<)

Country: USA | Posts: 5131 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/22/2017 :  12:05:36 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Louis,

I've been wanting to build one of these, but some of the metal kits out there don't look as good as yours. Now I don't need the instructions. Thanks for showing us this build. I know you will do an amazing job.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 2972 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/22/2017 :  08:42:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


Mike

Country: USA | Posts: 12537 Go to Top of Page

k9wrangler
Fireman



Posted - 01/22/2017 :  09:20:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Another interesting build Louis, thanks for sharing it with us.

Stand UP for AMERICA!!

Karl Scribner
Kentucky Southern Railway
Sunfield Township Michigan

Country: USA | Posts: 8969 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/22/2017 :  09:34:50 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Fascinating project, Louis. I think it's safe to say, if it has wheels, you're going to build a model of it.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14155 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/22/2017 :  10:03:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ted, Rich, Mike, Karl and George Thanks so much for your great comments, and following along with my project builds. It's the members like yourselves that make building these projects worth the time to post and share ideas.
And yes George, you hit the nail on the head, things with wheels kind of interest me more so that structure building. But the hobby as a whole is my passion.


Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 17911 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/22/2017 :  11:43:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
These next set of pictures shows the parts for the slip tongue/pole glued together, and in operation. As the team of HO scale Noch Draft Horses look on, it shows how the axle set-up moves forward as the prototype slip tongue High Wheel would have responded. Not only did the High Wheels work to lift the logs when the team of horses pulled on the tongue, but when going downhill, the cart would slide forward at the axle on the tongue, automatically lowering the logs back to the ground to scrape the ground and work as an effective braking system. It was a very effective design that saved the lives of horses and men while greatly increasing productivity.









Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 17911 Go to Top of Page

Cowboybilly
Crew Chief

Posted - 01/22/2017 :  11:49:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
very nice idea , and a fine work , i like it

Frank The Cowboybilly

Country: Germany | Posts: 709 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/22/2017 :  12:03:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Cowboybilly

very nice idea , and a fine work , i like it



Thank you very much Frank!


Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 17911 Go to Top of Page
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