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Author Previous Topic: Geezers Lounge Volume 24 Topic Next Topic: Tuesday geezer lounge is open
Page: of 26

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 01/20/2017 :  10:41:49 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I certainly am not tied to these structures. They were mocked up to give me an idea of space requirements. I should have mentioned the dimensions I have to work with: That piece of paper is 48" long and is 17" wide at the right and 8" on the left. The track is currently about 7" from the edge and I wanted to leave a couple of inches of water at the edge as well.
Thanks Mark for that pointer to Deerfield - I think I had run across them in my searches. I can see the the footprint of their models is a bit smaller than what I had and perhaps I can rein in the architect!
Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1087 Go to Top of Page

ChiloquinRuss
Crew Chief



Posted - 01/20/2017 :  1:12:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit ChiloquinRuss's Homepage  Reply with Quote
How about this, the buildings on a pier do not need to have 90 degree corners. Make the building fit the space. Also loose the portions of the building that stick out from the main structure at ground (pier) level. If you want some eye candy do that on a second floor overhang but at a track height clearance.

Just a quickie thought, I love piers so many ways to do it and they all look cool! Russ




Country: USA | Posts: 673 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 01/20/2017 :  2:52:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's a good thought Russ. I had considered doing the pie-shaped building as well and I haven't discounted it but it does have to look functional....maybe as a bit of an addition for an office or boiler room....I will noodle that one around for a bit.
Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1087 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 01/23/2017 :  4:49:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have included some sketches of possible configurations of the corner wharf area. The first one is where the sub bed is currently existing. I thought that perhaps having a cannery where the train could pull into a loading area. That would give me a large enough building to be believable.
The second option is to move the track upwards giving more wharf space below it to have some structures. I don't how much room I would need to have a stiff-legged derrick on the corner but it would be cool.
The last idea was to move the track down, putting the structures opposite the track.
Thoughts? Ideas?
Cheers,
Dave




Country: Canada | Posts: 1087 Go to Top of Page

ChiloquinRuss
Crew Chief



Posted - 01/24/2017 :  12:09:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit ChiloquinRuss's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I like option 'B'. Lot's of opportunities for detailing I think. Russ


Country: USA | Posts: 673 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 02/05/2017 :  12:00:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've been noodling and I agree, Russ, Option B it is.
Thanks,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1087 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 02/05/2017 :  12:16:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I glued some cork down for my road bed. This was quite a decision since it seems that many modellers don't do this for )n30 but I figured that my railroad was successful enough to have decent roadbed.....and I had already bought the cork. Next was to figure out the "shadow box" itself, or rather the height of the viewing window. I tried putting up a mock valence first two pictures are with a 6" valence shot from across the room and from the operator's view point. The last two are with an 8" valence from the same vantage points. I noticed that with the 6" one, I could see the back top corner of the backdrop; the 8" one hid more. Of course shorter people (my wife and kids) will see the top. Any thoughts?
Dave









Edited by - David Clark on 02/05/2017 12:19:21 AM

Country: Canada | Posts: 1087 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 02/06/2017 :  6:42:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am continuing to lay down cork road bed. I thought I would show how I'm doing it. I squeeze out a line of "No More Nails" around the perimeter and then spread it out with a putty knife, ensuring that the edges are covered. My first few had a heavier application but I think it was a bit much. I no longer put a bead down the centre. The important thing is not to move it once the glue has set (it sets in about a minute but cures over several hours). I am covering the module joint and then cutting in the separation once it is laid down but before I weight it down for curing.
Once it has cured sufficiently (about 3 hours) I remove the weights and cut a 45 degree bevel on the side. For interest's sake I am using 1/16" cork sheets trimmed into 2" strips. it does slight bends OK and I cut lines half-way through the width if curves were tighter, to allow the strip to bend without wrinkling.
Any thoughts welcome.
Cheers,
Dave






In this last picture you can see some "wedges" I cut out of the inside curve but I found later than just cutting slits into the outside corner was easier and the tiny spaces won't affect ground cover application (hopefully). You can also see the wallpaper roller I use to press down the cork before weighting it.




Country: Canada | Posts: 1087 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 02/06/2017 :  9:10:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Got my backdrop material cut to height (still need to cut it to length). There will be two separate pieces - one for each module. The material is styrene about 1/32" thickness or so. I was going to use it as bases for buildings I was going to build for wargaming terrain that never happened. My plan is to paint it with white primer from a rattle can then paint it, as any backdrop, with acrylics. Not sure how to join the edges between the two modules.
Dave




Country: Canada | Posts: 1087 Go to Top of Page

Philip
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 02/06/2017 :  11:41:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good Dave!. My ME turnouts were just like yours and I fixed them with a little filing and bending the point into alignment. The hardest part was removing the CAed plate holding the spring in. I did call Micro mark and then send me a return slip...great customer service!

Philip



Edited by - Philip on 02/06/2017 11:42:53 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 2423 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 02/07/2017 :  2:04:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Philip

Looking good Dave!. My ME turnouts were just like yours and I fixed them with a little filing and bending the point into alignment. The hardest part was removing the CAed plate holding the spring in. I did call Micro mark and then send me a return slip...great customer service!

Philip


Good for you! I went back to my LHS and they had another one in-stock so we just traded - lucky me!
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1087 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 02/13/2017 :  12:09:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So I had a bit of a setback this morning when I found that the second part of my backdrop piece was left by the fireplace and got a kink in it. I don't think I will be able to flatten it out either. I will try using a heat gun on it because I didn't have much luck with the hairdryer. It is a heavy styrene so I'm hoping that the heat didn't warp it beyond repair. Bad news is that I don't know where I can get a replacement. Might have to try a wood product...:-(
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1087 Go to Top of Page

Philip
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 02/13/2017 :  12:55:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
About the kink in your roadbed...Yes I was suggesting belt sanding the high spot, sorry it took so long to answer. Missed the post.

I just bought 3 Light Iron turnouts. They are so sweet! Hindsight 20/20. Glad they exchanged your ME reject!

I've always use masonite aka pegboard material for backdrop and edge skirting.

Your progress is great!

Philip



Country: USA | Posts: 2423 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 02/13/2017 :  3:16:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Philip! Sanding did work. I will give the cork a light sand to make sure it's level, as well.
The styrene is only 1/16" and the slots I cut into the upper braces fit that thickness. If I get hardboard at this point, I will have to recut those slots and that's something I don't think I want to tackle unless I have to.
I may get a chance to lay some track down today!
Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1087 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 02/19/2017 :  5:30:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In an attempt to justify the amount of time I spent playing with SketchUp to get a draft building plan I thought I would share what I had done. I know a lot of guys have fancy CAD programmes and I am jealous at the seeming ease in which they produce awesome drawings. My challenges are trying to figure out how much real estate a structure will take up, as well as planning a building. I see lots of cool buildings on-line and would love to reproduce them (to a certain extent) but have a hard time figuring out dimensions. I discovered this programme a while ago but gave up on it for lack of instruction. YouTube is rife with people sharing their knowledge and I have now been able to figure it out somewhat.
I took a picture of a structure I found in one of the forums - my apologies for not having noted whose it was - to use as a guide. It was from the Blue Sky Warehouse model. Here's how it went:
I downloaded the picture and imported it into SketchUp. This picture was great because the angles were such that I could see two sides quite well and it was very clear.



When you import it, make sure you choose the "use as new matched photo" in the import box. Click on 'Import" and then you get the picture overlaid with a bunch of green and red lines, along with the axes and "Fred" just standing around.


You will use the green and red lines to align the perspective in the photo with the drawing. Use the cursor to pull the boxes at the ends of the dotted coloured lines to a point on the photo that sits on the beginning of a easy-to-trace line then put the box at the other end of the coloured line at the end of the line in the photo. There are two red and two green lines to move around in this way. I think the further apart they are, the better the programme will be able to figure out perspective. You can zoom in and out to best match the boxes to points on the photo. For the plane along the red axis, I used the front of the loading dock and the edge of the roof line; for the plane along the Green axis, I used the bottom of the building and the roof line of the dormer. Once that is done, relocate the axes origin (yellow box) to a corner of the building where you can use features in the photo to help size the height of "Fred". I used a doorway.


When you click on "Done" you are left with the photo and the drawing axes....and "Fred". You can now draw along the building lines to produce a 3D model. You can't rotate the drawing AND retain the photo. As soon as you try to, the photo disappears. You can get it back - it's not the end of the world. I drew as much as I could using the perspective I had and then rotated the building to fill it in.



SketchUp can keep you on the right plane and axis if you pay attention to the colours of the lines that are being drawn - red is aligned with the red axis and so on - however once you finish the line, it will be black. If you successfully draw a plane (i.e. the four points are all connected, the plane will show up blanked out. You then just keep adding shapes until you have a 3D structure.


Here is one face of the building in question. Once I was all done, I had a complete 3D structure that I could use to print off elevation views or take off measurements from. If I want to make it bigger or smaller I can use SketchUps Scale feature before I add doors and windows.


In my case, I wanted to flip the floorpan, and SketchUp allows you to do this about any of the three axes. I also chose to make the "office" area an open-air transfer dock from the sea-side to the land-side. This will allow me to look through and see the train on the other side.


Once I had my walls laid out, I filled in the floor, offset the walls, added the loading dock footprint and, "voila!" a floorpan I could print to scale, cut out, and try out on my layout.


This process took quite a few hours for me. Hopefully the next one will be quicker. I am also sure there might have been better (or faster) ways to get where I got so any comments are welcome. The next building, I think, will be an engine house.
Cheers, Dave



Edited by - David Clark on 02/19/2017 5:36:36 PM

Country: Canada | Posts: 1087 Go to Top of Page
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