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Author Previous Topic: Geezers Lounge Volume 24 Topic Next Topic: Tuesday geezer lounge is open
Page: of 26

brucet
Engine Wiper

Posted - 07/18/2017 :  9:19:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
David what's your trick for holding those darned nbw while inserting them.? I drill a fine hole. That's ok. But every second nbw flies off into the great unknown. With a carpeted floor I think my vac must be full of them!!!

bruce



Country: Australia | Posts: 381 Go to Top of Page

ed k
Fireman

Posted - 07/18/2017 :  9:48:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Damn, I answered in the wrong thread. Well I have Dave confused.
My answer was model to in F/G scale. Just kidding with you.
I model in O and use a high end tweezr which helps. Some still go flying. Good luck.
ed



Country: USA | Posts: 1091 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 07/19/2017 :  1:10:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by brucet

David what's your trick for holding those darned nbw while inserting them.? I drill a fine hole. That's ok. But every second nbw flies off into the great unknown. With a carpeted floor I think my vac must be full of them!!!

bruce


Bruce, I drill my hole fairly big - the washer will cover it and I have a bigger target to aim for. I have a pair of tweezers that spring closed so I can let them grip the NBW while I try to position it. I then use my fat finger or a pointy bit to push the NBW into the hole I made. I will try to post some pictures.
Thanks for your question.
Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1085 Go to Top of Page

brucet
Engine Wiper

Posted - 07/19/2017 :  10:59:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Heh heh heh. I just built a set of roof trusses. Needed 60 nbw. Used 71. The rest are somewhere but I'm not sure where somewhere is!
The lesson learned is to buy way more than I need.
I also think I need to use larger ones. Even if they are 'technically' to big. It's the impression rather than the correctness that counts. Yes no?

bruce



Country: Australia | Posts: 381 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 07/20/2017 :  11:01:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Absolutely Bruce! Much like a painting, you are trying to convey an idea or image. As part of a scene, it doesn't have to be hyper-realistic. Different from those building scale models for show, where the model itself is the object being viewed.
Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1085 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 07/21/2017 :  12:53:50 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I did a bit more work on the mine buildings with some additional weathering. I added rolled roofing to the hoist house, stuck the sheave up on the head frame and cut out the openings for the doors and window on the tipple shed. Had I been less anxious to glue the walls together, I would have cut them out while they were flat on the table.




The two pictures were taken in different locales to try to see if lighting made a difference. I guess the flash is so powerful that it overpowers everything else. The roof was dry brushed with a dark grey followed by a lighter grey going along the slope of the roof. Later I will add some more weathering with powders or oils.


The tipple shed is made of black foam core. I will side it with some strip wood when I get some more. I am thinking of adding a corrugated tin roof, although I imagine the builders would have used the same stuff as on the hoist house. We'll say that the tipple shed was built later on


I added more powders in the corners to darken the shadows. I had made the one door and chutes too dark, so I added some white powder to tone it down. In real life, it looks OK. I also added some shading to the NBWs. I dabbed a brown powder and alcohol mix around each one with a brush large enough to cover the whole NBW. I did a few times to get enough shading. I did the same to the head frame ones.


I attached the sheave and bearings to the head frame using Aleenes's glue. Before gluing them on, I sprayed them Rustoleum Camo Brown and washed them with rusty brown powders. I will likely add some lighter rust spots and some staining running down the wood beams.
I was provided with some white string for the ore car lift. Does anyone have a method for de-fuzzing it and colouring it?
Cheers,
Dave



Edited by - David Clark on 07/21/2017 12:56:53 AM

Country: Canada | Posts: 1085 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/21/2017 :  07:25:15 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

You've been busy. Everything looks very good.

Regarding photos, it's hard to control colors and intensity with flash. I use an intense bulb (200 watt?). That way I can also do a color balance on my camera, a feature I discovered recently. Not to criticize your photos; they turn out good. Many of us cannot use flash at all.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 3945 Go to Top of Page

BigLars
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 07/21/2017 :  07:37:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, you are doing an excellent job on the ore bin.

My current build:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=50375

Country: USA | Posts: 11191 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 07/21/2017 :  1:13:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the feedback. I know of this "white balance" thing; just not how to use it on my camera. (doh!)

Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1085 Go to Top of Page

brucet
Engine Wiper

Posted - 07/21/2017 :  6:05:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave the 'simplest' way to handle White Balance on your camera is to put it in Auto mode. No point killing brain cells when you have a camera to figure it out!!

Tipple is looking good.

bruce



Country: Australia | Posts: 381 Go to Top of Page

Terrell
Fireman

Posted - 07/21/2017 :  6:28:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I never use the flash. Just try to get the best (often portable) lighting I can.

With nbw's I use tweezers and I think the trick is to not squeeze too hard. Can't remember the last time I lost one, in any scale.



Country: | Posts: 1586 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/21/2017 :  7:24:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

I violated one of my principles and read the instructions.

I assume every camera will be a little different, but it basically works like taking a photo of a white surface under the light conditions you want to use. It was easy nice I knew where it was on the menu.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 3945 Go to Top of Page

brucet
Engine Wiper

Posted - 07/21/2017 :  8:25:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike to be 'technically' correct you need to set white balance by using a grey/gray card. But this is a train forum so I wont complicate it any more than that.

bruce



Country: Australia | Posts: 381 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 07/21/2017 :  10:28:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I actually enjoy reading instructions so I will have to dive into the manual and figure it out.
I am planning my engine house (single stall with workshop) and I would like your thoughts on construction materials. I was going to go board-on-board but I am not planning on having a detailed, roof-removing interior but the doors will be open so some of it will be visible. I wanted to do board and batten siding and I thought that to cut down on costs, I could just order the pre-made siding and attach it to a post-and-beam frame. Do you think it will warp if I use an IA wash? Will the post-and-beam frame be sufficient to keep the walls straight and flat? I also considered putting the sheet siding over a foam-core structure but the interior walls will be flat and black. I am going to order wood by the weekend so any tips would be appreciated.
Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1085 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/22/2017 :  09:07:18 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

I expect you will get many responses. With different answers. My experience with weathering of sheetwood is an initial warping that goes away, especially if I weight it down while it is drying. I usually stain both sides. Similar with paint. Bracing takes care of any residual warp, often the case at the peaks of end walls. I use heavy bracing.

On the other hand, I painted the board and batten sides of a long car shop and each piece warped in the same direction. Even gluing them together and adding bracing did not take care of the problem and I had to assemble the walls and cross braces with brads. I'm not sure what I did different than usual because the whole thing was a surprise.

The only thing I can think of is that unlike clapboard, the grain in the sections of board and batten siding is vertical in the completed wall and I had to use several pieces to get the required width of wall, which meant that small warp in each section added up to a whole lot. I did not have that problem with a freight house that also required several sections of board and batten siding, although it is possible I assembled and braced the walls before painting them.

Unexpected problems serve to keep us humble. I don't think most people have problems with IA.

I think good bracing will fix any warp. I don't think foam core sub walls would do any better and they would result in very thick walls.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 3945 Go to Top of Page
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