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Author Previous Topic: Martin G. Jones Machine Shop Topic Next Topic: The Oak Grove RR. 5-27-2018
Page: of 25

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 01/07/2017 :  10:35:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have abandoned the thread "Dave's First On30 Layout" to start this one as I had figured out a name and want to keep a dialogue and record going of the build.
Having secured a place in the basement, I need to relocate some furniture and a (rarely used) treadmill belonging to my mother-in-law.
I started by building the benchwork out of 1/2" plywood, with 3/4" plywood gussets in the corners for stability. I pre-drilled holes in the girders for wiring. Each module is 78" x 30" as per the layout in my first post.
The modules are nice and light, I think the heaviest single piece will be the 1/4" piece of hardboard that will be the surface of the water. Legs were built up from 1x2 and 1x3 boards and long enough to put the module at about the 4' height. Since I'm building a shadow box, I think this will be a nice height for my 5"8" body.
I had some cool stuff arrive over Christmas - some manual turnout controls from Fast Tracks called Bullfrog turnout Control that require assembly. Check them out at www.fast-tracks.net. They weren't too expensive. I also picked up some "suitcase" connectors from Lordco, an automotive supply store, two packs of 15 came to $7.00 - definitely less expensive than a model railroad retailer (sorry).
Cheers,
Dave















Country: Canada | Posts: 1014

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 01/07/2017 :  11:00:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
No plan survives contact with the enemy - something I learned in the Army and was proven here as well. To transfer my layout to the plywood sub-base I cut out the plan I had laid out on a roll of craft paper. I cut along the centre line and used that as a guide to draw the centre line onto the plywood.





While laying out my sub base I drew what was supposed to be the edge of the track bed on the wrong side resulting in me cutting out a chunk of my sub base. So there is my first oopsie. I managed to find the cut off and glue it back on with some gussets underneath.



Next is legs, figuring out elevations for the sub road bed, and anchoring it.
Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1014 Go to Top of Page

David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 01/08/2017 :  08:26:45 AM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Dave, if you are considering a backdrop of any sort, now is the time to convince all your housemates how nice the walls would look painted sky blue..... and maybe a cloud or two

Yeah just seven or eight nice clouds....... and a mountain.....

Yeah needs a mountain... Definitely needs a mountain and some trees in the distance....

OH... And almost forgot some...

I'm sure others will chime in shortly.


Home of the North Coast Railroad.

Edited by - David J Buchholz on 01/08/2017 11:14:24 AM

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ChiloquinRuss
Crew Chief



Posted - 01/08/2017 :  11:56:29 AM  Show Profile  Visit ChiloquinRuss's Homepage  Reply with Quote
And a fiber optic chandelier so there are stars when night running and . . . . Russ


Country: USA | Posts: 671 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 01/08/2017 :  4:24:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David J Buchholz

Dave, if you are considering a backdrop of any sort, now is the time to convince all your housemates how nice the walls would look painted sky blue.....

I will be adding a backdrop but it will be part of the shadowbox. I won't be painting any walls ...blue or otherwise.
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1014 Go to Top of Page

brucet
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/08/2017 :  7:33:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yup divorce is more expensive than a backdrop.

I attached white board for a backdrop on the rear edge of my layout. It sits about a half inch out from the walls.

bruce



Country: Australia | Posts: 353 Go to Top of Page

Smokestack Jack
Engine Wiper



Posted - 01/09/2017 :  10:39:30 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks like you are off to a great start. I'm going to enjoy watching your progress.


Country: USA | Posts: 309 Go to Top of Page

Philip
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 01/09/2017 :  11:26:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
looks Great!

Philip



Country: USA | Posts: 2388 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/09/2017 :  2:18:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There are many very well made backdrops out there Dave. And personally, I think they look much more realistic than paintings, unless a professional artist has painted it. That being said though, Painting or photo Backdrop is still better than no back drop at all'..(LOL).
Have you had a chance to look at Joey Picard's, www.tracksidescenery.com/. Really great stuff and he will custom make it for your actual size layout'..He is a forum member as well, and a very nice gentlemen. Best of luck with you construction...




Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 5450 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 01/13/2017 :  12:16:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have seen those back drops and am tempted but am also afraid that the realism may detract from everything else. I am no artist but am willing to give painting a go.
I was putting some more sub roadbed down and found that my elevations are out of whack. My original intention was to put the track down on a flat piece of styrofoam but changed my mind and went with a cookie cutter method to provide some elevation changes. The close proximity of the switches isn't allowing me to make too much elevation change and I am now wondering whether all the extra effort was worth it.



Coming from the West, the track slopes upward at 3% to cross over the top of the module edge but carrying on that slope puts a hump in the track because it needs to go back to zero at the coast on the right-hand module before going back up again. I know this sounds confusing.



I think I will take my router and lower the module edges at the joint by 1/4" to soften the transition. Hopefully that will solve the problem.



Wish me luck! Of course, any other bright ideas will be considered!
Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1014 Go to Top of Page

ChiloquinRuss
Crew Chief



Posted - 01/13/2017 :  01:02:17 AM  Show Profile  Visit ChiloquinRuss's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave what if you slightly raised the section directly under and in the middle of where the level is setting? This would ease the transition to the right of the level. Any transition like this also needs to be accomplished in the length of your longest car at a minimum or you will uncouple going over the joint. Russ




Country: USA | Posts: 671 Go to Top of Page

Philip
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 01/13/2017 :  01:11:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ah that's an easy fix with a belt sander.


Philip



Country: USA | Posts: 2388 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 01/13/2017 :  12:58:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ChiloquinRuss

Dave what if you slightly raised the section directly under and in the middle of where the level is setting? This would ease the transition to the right of the level. Any transition like this also needs to be accomplished in the length of your longest car at a minimum or you will uncouple going over the joint. Russ




Thanks for the reminder about car length and uncoupling - while I inherently knew that, it wasn't figuring in my figuring....
I think the slope would be OK if I continued on the same rise but because immediately after crossing onto the right-hand module there is a turnout leading to the wharf along the coast so there isn't enough room for a smooth transition back down to 0". If I lower the track at the module joint, I think that will even things out.
Phil, were you suggesting just sanding down that piece of sub-roadbed? The space under the level is due to me having the end "jacked up" by spacers in an effort to have a constant rise.
On another note....how wide should my sub-roadbed be? It seems I have made it a bit too wide (3") and I should trim them down a bit.
Any help/suggestions appreciated.
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1014 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 01/13/2017 :  7:12:36 PM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Buy making the joint for the uphill ramp to meet level ground at a single point it creates the hinge problem. Roads and bridges use a vertical curve to overcome this situation. You can create a vertical curve simply by using a length of roadway that starts before the peak and ends somewhere after the peak. The natural action of the wood will be to form an arch thus easing the transition from incline to level.






Country: USA | Posts: 4531 Go to Top of Page

brucet
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/13/2017 :  7:22:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How about!!!
If you can remove that piece of road bed, how about making numerous cuts on the underside of the road bed. Allowing it to bend. Then inserting one or two risers at equal distance along that section thus forming a curve/hump and bringing down the transition angle to the other roadbed.

Just a thought!

bruce



Country: Australia | Posts: 353 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 01/13/2017 :  7:53:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Frank Palmer

... You can create a vertical curve simply by using a length of roadway that starts before the peak and ends somewhere after the peak. The natural action of the wood will be to form an arch thus easing the transition from incline to level.



Yes but, if I understand you correctly, this solid piece would span the joint making the modularity of the layout null and void.
Dave



Edited by - David Clark on 01/13/2017 7:54:23 PM

Country: Canada | Posts: 1014 Go to Top of Page
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