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Author Previous Topic: The Coos Bay and Willamette  Valley Part two Topic Next Topic: New source for 3D printed arch-bar trucks
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OK Hogger
Fireman

Posted - 03/29/2021 :  8:16:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Ted!

I'm partial to the old 2 strokes, also. What I truly "need" for what I do with my vinduro tiddlers (day long dual sport rides) is a Honda SL/XL125 or XL175, but there's just too much 2 stroke oil in my blood. I just can't do it!

The wife and I LOVE where we live. Our mountains aren't as spectacular as the Rockies, or Sierras, or the Cascades, and such, but it's right in our own backyard, and they're pretty enough to cause ooo's and ahhh's from us, and the immediate ranges we access (about 35 min drive from the house) offers DAYS worth of riding. If we want more, then we can drive another 15-30 minutes in several directions and we access more ranges of the Ouachita mountains. We will never exhaust what can be ridden in the Ouachita Mountains. Also, IF we want, we can drive a total of 1 hr 15 to 1 hr 45 min and be in the Ozarks and ride and enjoy the ranges in the Ozarks have to offer!

Andre



Country: | Posts: 1067 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 03/31/2021 :  02:34:50 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm way to seldom on the forum and ow I have a lot of catching up to do. Love the vintage bikes particularly the Yamaha. Me and my boy also have a DT50MX from 86 that we are working on. It is a tough bike (or moped as it is called here).
Lots of cheap parts and easy to come by. Although we managed to drop the clutch drum in the floor which now is broken. That wasn't cheap to replace

Love the layout plan. Hand drawns looks wonderful! Lot of action with the switchbacks and also with the option of continous running.

A fast visit
Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1800 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Fireman

Posted - 03/31/2021 :  10:10:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi 'ya Håkan!

Good to see you stop by here in my thread! Let's see what you said:

"I'm way to seldom on the forum and ow I have a lot of catching up to do."

I understand about many interests and things that compete for our time. However, I'm always glad to see you stop by and say "HI!" here in my thread.

"Love the vintage bikes particularly the Yamaha. Me and my boy..."

I can't think of anything better than motorcycles for a connection point with a son. Motorcycling is a fantastic hobby/sport. Like model railroading, I've met lifelong friends through motorcycling.

Wild Child (my nickname for her) always beams when she's out riding her "Lil' Blue" (her AT3). She LOVES the "Magic Button"! (i.e. Electric start.) Here's another pic of her AT3:





"Love the layout plan. Hand drawns looks wonderful! Lot of action with the switchbacks and also with the option of continuous running."

I'm glad you find interest in my little slice of the Colorado & Pacific!

Hand drawn:

I've tried track plan design software. It lacks the tactile feel and look that I love about track planning. For me, sitting at the table with a sheet(s) of paper before me, my templates arrayed "just so", hot cup of coffee beside me, and doodling on a track plan is a very relaxing experience.

Switchbacks:

Most seasoned model railroaders quickly see the operational value in the switchbacks. In a practical sense, using switchbacks was the only logical way I could get helper grades w/maximum elevation change, and then back down to the same track level that was required for the closet tunnels.

Continuous run:

The ability for continuous running was inherent with the benchwork configuration, so it would have been foolish of me to not avail myself of it. Unlike my ill-fated reverse loops on my Ozark layout (which were a concession for turning engines/short trains for my steam era), there will truly be "hands off" continuous running capability with this plan. I will not have to fiddle with toggles/etc, in order to run continuously, just play with all the DCC/Sound whistles and bells and enjoy the flow of the train!

"A fast visit"

....zzzzzZZZZZOOOOMMMMMmmmmmmm.....

Bystander: "Who was that masked railroader, anyhow??"

Me: "Oh, that was Håkan of the frozen north!"



Andre



Country: | Posts: 1067 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Fireman

Posted - 04/02/2021 :  10:55:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
UPDATE:

Getting back on track (from my motorcycle side track)...

I'm continuing to amass the needs of my Colorado & Pacific theme as opportunity presents. Through the helpfulness of fellow TOC19'ers here at this forum, I now have:

* All the desired (thus needed) Instant Horizons ON HAND to do the closest "Redcloud" diorama.

* A Sequoia Models 65' A-frame turntable kit on the way. (I'll need to cut it down to 55' if possible, but that is likely doable and it appears to be an excellent kit!)

Still waiting for my box of Shinohara curved switches from the UK to make it through the overwhelmed Customs department at Chicago and begin making its way to me. During the stop this past week at my local USPS, the window worker advised me it could be "weeks or months" before it's processed.

Still watching The Bay for various items, but I've slowed way down in my acquisitions on account of the needed items are beginning to be filled.

All fer now!

Andre



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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/02/2021 :  1:26:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Andre, Might I advise that before you cut that turntable that you remeasure your engines and consider that the engine had to be balanced over the center pivot leaving considerable space in front of the engine. I have not had that experience with Chicago customs. From England or Sweden. They did lose one parcel going to Sweden for about 6 months (and then returned it to me).

Looking forward to the build.

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5813 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Fireman

Posted - 04/02/2021 :  1:29:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This picture showed up on the Early Rail groups.io list. According to the site, it's dated 1875:



What a fascinating picture! That cattle car is almost a dead ringer for the Mehano cattle car that I have several of. Also, the tank-on-flat's look a lot like the Mehano version!

Do any of you see anything in the photo that would date it later than 1875?

Below is the link that was supplied in the post that allows you to expand and explore:

https://digital.librarycompany.org/islandora/object/digitool%3A101450?solr_nav%5Bid%5D=4d6f868b6fe76befedd0&solr_nav%5Bpage%5D=0&solr_nav%5Boffset%5D=22

All fer now!

Andre



Country: | Posts: 1067 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 04/02/2021 :  4:01:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
This photo is a real standout.

Stock cars are often seen around oil fields, maybe because they were available on the offseason, and maybe because being ventilated they would not fill with fumes, and maybe both. I’ve seen a photic of an oil car and it’s basically a stock car in design.

I believe the Mehano car is based on a PRR stock car like the one in the photo.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 7452 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/02/2021 :  4:44:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Short answer, nothing in here would force a date after 1870s, and it's most likely from before 1890s.

The primary means for shipping oil Back in the Day was barrels. So cars designed for oil transportation provided ventilation for the fumes, and stock cars worked great for that. The car itself looks like a PRR car. Someone has made early PRR stock cars, maybe Alkem? There's a somewhat earlier Civil War stockcar kit: http://www.btsrr.com/bts9525.htm (BTS also has the famous Densmore oil tank car that has 2 vertical barrels on a flatcar. The prototype is at the Titusville Oil museum, in terrible shape!) Tank cars are relatively unchanged from 1870s-1890s once they went to horizontal iron tanks, the later cars had somewhat larger tanks, I think. On the flatcar bottom left, looks like tin containers for distilled products, like lubricating oil or kerosene.

Now the stills in the picture are the "Cheesebox" design. Those were the original design, later in the 19th century stills looked more like large tank cars with a brick foundation. The process was to heat the oil, and capture the fumes as they came off at different temperatures. Hence the chimney, often they would burn crude but more commonly natural gas. The structure between the two stills is probably the condenser, just coils with water circulating around them. Refining took a lot of water, you'd find them near rivers. The next step after condensing would be to purify the oil, usually by alternating acids and alkalies, plus lots of water to wash out the byproducts.

The one thing I don't know is what the arched door building was for. Could be receiving house for oil, or a barreling/bottling facility.

I forget where this was taken, but it's somewhere in Northwest PA.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 8959 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Fireman

Posted - 04/02/2021 :  4:45:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Mike!

I haven't a clue about why a cattle car would be in an oil plant!

See anything that makes you suspect the 1875 date as being too early?

Reason: I didn't realize tank cars like that were already in service in 1875, so I'm wondering if it's mis-dated.

Andre



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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 04/02/2021 :  5:50:39 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Andre,

The Densmore wood-tank-on-a-flatcar design was used for just a few years. Iron tank cars date to the 1860's. The first patent was in 1868.

The PRR stock car is an 1870's design.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 7452 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Fireman

Posted - 04/02/2021 :  9:30:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for additional input, Mike.

I'm surprise a bit in that I find those tank cars "interesting". Don't know of any way a few could be justified on an early 1880s road in Colorado, though. And there's that "Gnats n' Camels" thing again. That is, I'm wondering if such a tank car would be "plausible (gagging on a gant), but I've swallowed a camel. (The C&P didn't even exist!!) Yup, "Gnat's n' Camels".



Andre



Edited by - OK Hogger on 04/03/2021 12:09:34 AM

Country: | Posts: 1067 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Fireman

Posted - 04/03/2021 :  12:09:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just picked up one of these for the stock pile:





Probably going to end up purchasing log structures from several suppliers for variety.

The process continues...

Andre



Country: | Posts: 1067 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/03/2021 :  12:16:28 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
nice score


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5813 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Fireman

Posted - 04/03/2021 :  12:23:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks... but mine doesn't look like that!

Should have mentioned that mine is a NIB kit. So at this point it's a pile of sticks!



Andre



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OK Hogger
Fireman

Posted - 04/03/2021 :  01:01:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
All:

Looking for suggestions for some depots. I'm not familiar at all with what is/has been available in HO that's appropriate for my era (early 1880s), as well as locale (Colorado Rockies), and town size (see below).

I will need 4 depots. A "family" resemblance for 3 of them would be good, but not a deal breaker. Here's what I need:

* Redcloud: Theorized town size about like Red Mountain Town on the Silverton RR.

* Buckhorn: Theorized town size about like Hancock on the DSP&P.

* Moccasin Pass: Log construction. Very small community: Couple false front businesses a few log residences.

* Avalanche: Small settlement about like Woodstock on the DSP&P before the devastating slide.

Any input would be thoughtfully considered and appreciated. Thanks!

Andre



Country: | Posts: 1067 Go to Top of Page
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