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Author Previous Topic: Fire-Hose House Topic Next Topic: Building a blast furnace
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Guff
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/07/2016 :  7:14:57 PM  Show Profile  Send Guff an AOL message  Reply with Quote
My next build is the Santos Barrel Manufacturing Company. I named it after RR-L member Bob Santos.
Bob recently made a building called Guffey Tavern for his railroad in Pennsylvania so I thought he should have a name sake building on a railroad in Wisconsin.
The construction will be foamboard, stripwood, construction paper and styrene. The scale is 1:29.
The sketch is a concept of what I will attempt to build.


The build represents an old stone house with a slate roof converted into a factory with an added corrugated metal building annex.
I tried a few new methods (at least new to me) during this build and will only highlight these areas. Everything else follows fairly typical scratchbuilding methods.

Stone House Walls
I started by photographing a stone wall with the color and stone formation that appealed to me. Then I reduced the photo to 1:29 scale on a wordpad program. (Could have used paint but I'm use to using Wordpad)
I measured a few of the stones at 1:1 then reduced to 1:29 scale (.414" equal 12" in 1:29 scale or .035" = 1") A big stone say 15" across would measure .525" or 1/2"+ rounded off.
[
The walls are made from black Elmers FoamBoard 7/16" thick. 1:29 scale requires large wall areas and the 7/16" resists warping and bowing with little internal bracing required. The sections are glued together with Aleene's Fast Grab Tacky Glue. Great glue requiring little hold time if used sparingly.

Used an old "no ink" ballpoint pen for carving the stone. Only a little pressure is required and the ballpoint forms the mortar joint and rolls nicely to prevent gouging of the foamboard.

I placed the 1:29 scale copy of the stone work on the walls and used the photo as a guide for carving the stone in the appropriate shapes and sizes. Be sure to align the corners of each wall when carving and match up the corner stones so they appear to go around the corner.
I choose to use butt joint corners so after assembly I filled in some of the corner joints with drywall patch and repainted to hide seams. (next time I will make the corners with a 45 degree cut to reduce patchwork of the square cut corners)
Don't forget to mark out for stone window sills before carving stone.
The carving takes some time but is easy to do.

Next step, after carving, is to build up a few random stones and gouge out others. I use Dap DryDex to build up the stones - goes on pink and dries white when hardening. If desired, trim and sand the DryDex to fine tune the added blotches .
This photo shows the areas where random blotches of paste were added to build up some of the stones. Also remember to carve a few of the other stones a little deeper for additional accent.

Painting: I used eight colors of acrylic paint choosing colors as close as possible to match the photo .
Step 1. Dilute Khaki Tan acrylic to a thin wash and coat the wall. Allow to dry in mortar joints.
Step 2. Look at your photo and color the stones to match the pattern as close as possible.

Step 3. Apply a thicker wash of Khaki Tan acrylic paint and dab off the stones with a paper towel before the paint drys. This will put more color in the mortar and add a light brown tone to all of the wall stones.

Next time the corrugated panels.
David Guffey

Country: USA | Posts: 1910

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 02/07/2016 :  7:35:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice start to a Major Project! Thanks for sharing this!

I need to try this technique, but first I need to get the track down and the railroad operational....

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 7315 Go to Top of Page

Ray Dunakin
Fireman



Posted - 02/07/2016 :  8:59:26 PM  Show Profile  Visit Ray Dunakin's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Looks great so far. Nice work matching the colors of the stones

Looks like you peeled off the paper on that foam core board before scribing it. Is that correct?



Country: USA | Posts: 3303 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/07/2016 :  10:30:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great technique Dave'. Looks like a nice project you have going on there'..I'll be following along. Great job matching the coloring of the stones'..


Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 6079 Go to Top of Page

sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/08/2016 :  08:35:14 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking very good, Dave, and thank you for giving me the honor of lending my name to your project. I
will be following along very closely.
Cheers,
Bob


http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=30102
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=51837

Country: USA | Posts: 4056 Go to Top of Page

Guff
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/08/2016 :  09:54:44 AM  Show Profile  Send Guff an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Thanks Pete...it is easy to do. By the way, I still don't have any track down and my shelves are filling up with models.
Ray...thanks for catching my omission. I did remove the paper on the side to be carved.
Thanks Ted...the color looks much better than my questionable photos. I'll take the finish photos in natural light.

Bob, the honor is mine. I'll think of all your neat projects each time I look at the building. Thank you for sharing all of your builds.
Dave


David Guffey

Country: USA | Posts: 1910 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 02/08/2016 :  11:29:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, this looks like it will be a barrel full of fun to watch!
And it's wonderful that you named it in honor of Bob.

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 8807 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/08/2016 :  12:43:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave,

Ditto on capturing the coloring of the stones. I will follow along with this project.
Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4605 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/08/2016 :  12:45:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Super selection as a dedication project. Wonderful to see a tip of hat to an outstanding modeler. Looks like you have an excellent start on this project. Your matching of the colors in the stones to the picture is surreal. Really nicely done. Looking forward to following your progress on this project.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7237 Go to Top of Page

Guff
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/08/2016 :  7:44:17 PM  Show Profile  Send Guff an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Greg, Kris and Rich...Thanks for the kind words and encouragement.
Kris, I have an excellent start because I jump started this project before I posted to be sure some of the ideas worked.
Dave

Corrugated Annex Building Panels

The corrugated annex is made from 3/16" foam board covered with construction paper panels to simulate rusting galvanized sheet.
Here is my method:
Search the web under metal panel finishes and you will find plain galvanized and rusted metal sheet patterns.
I saved six patterns I liked and then copied two of each pattern on an 8 1/2" x 11" sheet.


I used Elmers clear glue to bond the printed copies to 65 lb grey construction paper. This step makes the panels more rigid and when the underside of the panel is exposed, it is grey. Cut the sheets into 2 1/2" lengths (approx. 6' panels) making sure the rust pattern runs vertically or down the 2 1/2" strips.



Next step is to roll in the corrugated pattern. I used a Fiskars roller.



After adding the corrugation pattern cut the sheets into 1 1/4" widths (3' panels) I used painted white, lightly rusted for the walls and galvanized grey color with heavier rust for the roof.


This is the Fiskars cutter I used for the slate roof and the corrugated panels.


Here are the pictures of the panels applied on a roof.



David Guffey

Country: USA | Posts: 1910 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 02/08/2016 :  8:32:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave,

Cool technique. More information on the "Fiskars roller,' please!

Thanks.

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 7315 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/09/2016 :  12:08:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice job Dave'. The Fiskers roller is a great tool. The paper looks like the real thing'..Your technique is worth the effort. That is excellent corrugated
metal. Perfect'..



Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 6079 Go to Top of Page

sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/09/2016 :  06:50:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good idea, Dave, and good execution. I like it.

Bob


http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=30102
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=51837

Country: USA | Posts: 4056 Go to Top of Page

Guff
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/09/2016 :  10:04:12 AM  Show Profile  Send Guff an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Thanks, guys.
Pete...the Fiskar roller is called a paper crimper and the Fiskar cutter are both available in the craft area of Micheals and Hobby Lobby. Don't know if the crimpers are available with different rollers for smaller gauges but it works great for G scale.


David Guffey

Country: USA | Posts: 1910 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 02/09/2016 :  10:16:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sounds like a Road Trip is in order. Thanks!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 7315 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 02/09/2016 :  11:08:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, nice looking results with that corrugated roofing.

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 8807 Go to Top of Page
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