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Author Previous Topic: On30 Sugar Cane Hauler in 1920s Haiti Topic Next Topic: The Depot (at Carendt)
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Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/16/2017 :  08:44:58 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice track work, Kumar.



Country: USA | Posts: 31245 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 08/16/2017 :  09:56:45 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
That's kind of a wicked curve you threw in there but you made it this far so I see no reason you can't render this situation.


Country: USA | Posts: 5317 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/16/2017 :  12:59:56 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Michael >> The curve leading into the crossing where the boxcar rubs looks a little tight. Perhaps that is more the problem than the crossing itself. Actually, I have found it not unusual to need to trim rods etc underneath cars even for less extreme trackwork.

Frank >> That's kind of a wicked curve you threw in there but you made it this far so I see no reason you can't render this situation.

Thanks Mike and Frank. That curve was deliberately sharp. It is part of the original electric interurban/streetcar system that has been retained (after closure) to service a few remaining industries. One of the needs of a streetcar system and some interurbans was the ability to turn around a sharp street corner. That's what I wanted to capture here. It will lead to a little off layout staging platform (I have yet to design).





The sharp curve works just fine. Four wheel trucks navigate it nicely. However long wheelbase rolling stock does not - including my 40' box car - so I'm going to have to adapt the rolling stock. I also want to scratch-build the two locomotives that will run on this section and therefore I will build in the necessary clearances to get them around the curve.

The traction line will be run by something along these lines:


or maybe a boxcab like this:


Thanks all.


http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 08/16/2017 1:01:38 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 08/16/2017 :  2:44:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You are doing fabulous work. Very inspiring. Took a look at your website as well.
Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1230 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 08/16/2017 :  6:06:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kumar, Iím running 2 of those AGEIR locomotives made by Roundhouse with Bachmann chassis. They work great and look very unique.


Country: USA | Posts: 5317 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/16/2017 :  8:07:28 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave >> You are doing fabulous work. Very inspiring. Took a look at your website as well. >> Thank you Dave. I try to keep the blog and website updated as much as possible. Hopefully I will have a bunch of new photos in the gallery soon.

Frank >> Iím running 2 of those AGEIR locomotives made by Roundhouse with Bachmann chassis. They work great and look very unique. >> I know that Roundhouse locomotive. I've had my eye on it for sometime now and may still purchase it. I do want to 'have a go' at scratch-building a locomotive and think that a boxcab would be a great way to start. I've long admired the Visalia Electric boxcab displayed below and am thinking along those lines. I wouldn't be surprised if that boxcab has been a target of many a scratch-building effort. In my (relatively uninformed and humble) opinion it is a classic.





http://thedepotonline.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

adrian_batey
Fireman

Posted - 08/16/2017 :  11:51:07 PM  Show Profile  Visit adrian_batey's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi Kumar,

Have been reading from the start now over my lunch breaks. Im interested to know more about Templot and your experiences.
One thing i want to tackle is custom turnouts rather than the standard no.6 and no.5 on my logging line. If using this program to desing track work can you set standard frog angles ie. no5 and no.6 so i can use my point file jigs i have?


Owen Pass Lumber Company
HO Logging Layout in a Shed.
https://owenpass.blogspot.com/

Country: Australia | Posts: 1266 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 08/17/2017 :  10:11:37 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kumar, would you consider doing a Visalia Electric boxcab for Shapeways? You've done so well with 3-D drawings in the past.

Visalia (vy-SAYL-y)






Edited by - Frank Palmer on 08/17/2017 7:05:30 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 5317 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/17/2017 :  7:18:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The engineer in that photo is asking himself, what the heck did I get my self into today?

Great photo Frank'..

Kumard, with your skills the box cab will be a cake walk'...



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kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/17/2017 :  8:51:38 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Adrian >> I'm interested to know more about Templot and your experiences. >> I found Templot very challenging to learn. The software is not intuitive and the the documentation is scattered about or simply doesn't exist. In the end I built my own tech support page with the resources gathered together. It is located here: http://www.kumardesai.com/Templot/index.html . I eventually got it to work the way I needed it but it took a considerable amount of time. I'm not sure if I will use Templot again. I can draw track full-size on paper and build turnouts on top of that just as easily. I have a few Iain Rice books on handlaying track and he runs through a few methods where he started with hand-drawn diagrams.

Adrian >> One thing I want to tackle is custom turnouts rather than the standard no.6 and no.5 on my logging line. If using this program to design track work can you set standard frog angles ie. no5 and no.6 so I can use my point file jigs i have? >> As far as frogs are concerned they are the easiest part of a turnout to build. If you have a jig then that's great but if you have curved turnouts with unusual frog angles then standard jigs may not work. Templot just draws the frogs at whatever angles it needs to produce your custom turnout. I can't remember if you can set the turnout options to a standard frog angle before creating the turnout. I just built the frog on top of the diagram and filed the two parts down till I had the correct angle. See some of my earlier posts on turnout construction.

Frank >> would you consider doing a Visalia Electric boxcab for Shapeways? You've done so well with 3-D drawings in the past. >> That's good question Frank. I would like to produce the body in brass or nickel-silver as I want to improve my soldering and metal-working skills. The smaller details can be fabricated by Shapeways. And yes, the very first step is to produce a scale drawing of the locomotive in Sketch-Up which is something I can do quite easily now. Once I have that drawing I'll decide what role Shapeways is going to play. Many modelers have made parts available for sale on Shapeways so I might take a look at those items as well.

Great picture btw - I don't have that picture. I have a bunch of that locomotive in various books as well as a few found on the web. It's a fine looking locomotive.

Ted >> With your skills the box cab will be a cake walk' >> Thanks Ted, ha ha, I'm not sure about that but I find working in brass very satisfying. It's a very forgiving metal as long as you go slow. I found this really great book on scratch-building by Simon Bolton:



It's a UK book but has an easy-to-follow step-by-step text. As I read it I had many a 'so that's how you do that!' moment. I'm very interested in building the chassis from scratch and he describes how to a build chassis using Mashima motors. I'm looking forward to putting some of Simon Bolton's methods to use next year.

Thanks all!


http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 08/18/2017 02:10:12 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/18/2017 :  10:40:57 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Your trackwork came out nicely. In particular, your diamond is prettier than the last I built. I'll have to try Tim's notched rail method on the next (and last on my layout).

Regarding the boxcar, I usually find it worthwhile to figure out what the specific issue is: wheels fouling the frame or brake gear? It might help to shim between the trucks and frame, which might also require lowering the coupler a bit. Not things you'd want to do for a large fleet, but reasonable for your dioramas.

If it's coupler swing, the prototype had that problem. Electric locos used for freight on tight curves often had a long-shank swiveling coupler. I seem to recall examples owned by Pacific Electric. They would also push freight cars around curves without actually coupling, and pull them back with chains.



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Pokemonprime
New Hire

Posted - 08/18/2017 :  5:09:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Was that Visalia Electric boxcab Baldwin built? It almost looks like the single-trucks that the Hagerstown & Frederick had, but stretched :P


Country: USA | Posts: 24 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/18/2017 :  6:05:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
James >> It might help to shim between the trucks and frame >> I hadn't thought of that. i'll shims to my list of possible solutions to the problems. I've got a bunch of boxcar kits that need assembly so I maybe able to assemble them with the necessary clearances.

Keith >> Was that Visalia Electric boxcab Baldwin built? It almost looks like the single-trucks that the Hagerstown & Frederick had, but stretched >> now you've really got me going. Both railways used Baldwin boxcabs. They have a family resemblance. The Hagerstown and Frederick is one of the spiritual prototypes for my own interurban. It was a wonderful little railroad.

Here are the two locomotives for comparison:



I have plans for the second locomotive which may help me with the Visalia Baldwin.

Visalia No. 601 was a Westinghouse/Baldwin 1917
Frederick and Hagerstown No. 2 (originally Frederick Railroad No 23) was a Baldwin 1910


http://thedepotonline.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

Tim Hebert
Engine Wiper



Posted - 09/23/2017 :  2:15:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I keep this simple...I like it...I like your work a lot. Enough said...for now.


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kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/23/2017 :  9:19:26 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Tim.

With the diorama finally out the way I'm getting back to The Town.

List of work:

  1. Design a control panel in Sketchup and then go ahead and build it.

  2. Build second cassette - I need to be able to run trains on and off from both ends during wiring.

  3. Move light switch and design a small switch panel - maybe in brass to fit on the side.

  4. Start wiring. Pull up track on non crossovers-turnouts (ie the straight sections) and relay using prototypical rail lengths and joint bars.

  5. Wire track into sections, connect turnout motors and connect to the control panel.

  6. Purchase cassette cradles for the exit points.

  7. Test and move on.


Its essential that the layout work and not be a diorama so wiring is a crucial part of the project. Here we go.





http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 09/23/2017 9:21:33 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page
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