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Author Previous Topic: On30 Sugar Cane Hauler in 1920s Haiti Topic Next Topic: The Depot (at Carendt)
Page: of 24

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/20/2017 :  7:27:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
impressive workmanship on a very tedious task'.. You are indeed a true railroad model craftsman'..


Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 6051 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 03/21/2017 :  11:53:07 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Frank.

Ted >> impressive workmanship on a very tedious task >> Thanks Ted. I like these sorts of challenges so I don't have a problem putting in the time. Let's see how things go with cutting and laying out the rails and then of course powering the whole thing up. If I think too far ahead I start to get a headache so I'm just taking it one small step at a time.

Here's the finished fixture ready for rails - I'll get to this next weekend.



http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 03/22/2017 02:18:25 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/22/2017 :  07:35:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's a very impressive turnout you have constructed, which is way beyond my realm of thought process. I am astonished by your abilities to build these as well as attach rails and to get it to run engines on.
Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4589 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/22/2017 :  08:02:47 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Handlaying is both fun and a path to a lot more flexibility in track planning. I've built three diamonds to date,
but I've never tried Tim's slotted rail technique, so I'm watching with interest.



Country: USA | Posts: 6469 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 03/22/2017 :  1:10:42 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks all.

JBVB >> I've built three diamonds to date >> James, I'll be interested to find out how you wired up the diamonds. I have Andy Sperando's book "Easy Model Railroad Wiring" which I will study this evening after which I'll get a plan of action into place.

Easy? We'll see!


Thanks all. More on this project in a couple of weeks.


http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 03/22/2017 1:11:20 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 04/15/2017 :  10:44:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi everyone. Here's an update on this project.

Well after a period of procrastination I finally made the switch from the diorama project to the track-laying project.

I have to admit I was quite nervous. It had taken two months to learn templot just to get curves on the diagram right, then I had to figure out how to get the plan printed out, and then I spent another week preparing and laying down ties - all done just to get to this starting point.

The crossover and the two supporting turnouts are meant to be the focus of the layout - the 'star' element - so getting this right was crucial. As this is the first crossover I've ever built I had to find a method that seemed straightforward enough for a beginner. Tim Warris's method of notched rails looked very promising. However he had a bunch of tools to assist him which I had no chance of ever obtaining. The question in my head was could I do the same thing without those tools? Now that I've finished the project the answer is a resounding yes!

Deciding that the best form of attack is, well, attack, I just started and worked my way carefully through each stage.

Here's the starting point:


First things first was to lay down the running and guard on the mainline. Pretty straightforward.


Then I cut notches in the rail to recive the first crossover rail. I cut them narrow at first and then made them wider when I fit the second guard rails.


I laid down the outer rail, soldered it and then widened the gap and repeated the process for the guard rail. Here's where I ended up:


Repeat the process for the second rail:


Then finally open the gaps and there you have it the first crossover. It took 3/4 of an hour:


I repeated the process for the second track until I reached this point:




The Tim Warris method does a great job of preserving curves through crossovers. By laying tracks in one piece across each other the frogs are perfectly lined up and allow trucks to travel across smoothly.

In conclusion, I would say that this project turned out to be much easier than expected. I really thought it might fall apart at any moment but in the end it came together like a charm.

This part of the project was the summit, hopefully it will be all downhill (in a good way) from now on.

I'll get to the turnouts this week and post photos once I have them.

Thanks all!


http://thedepotonline.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/15/2017 :  11:07:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
They look nice. All three diamond crossings I've built have been curved, but this looks as good as the older methods I've used, while being a
good deal faster.



Country: USA | Posts: 6469 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/16/2017 :  12:00:05 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good. HOW re you going to gap the rails?

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5652 Go to Top of Page

time2play
Fireman



Posted - 04/16/2017 :  08:54:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Fabulous work on those crossings. Impressive...

Bob



Country: Canada | Posts: 1154 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 04/16/2017 :  12:55:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Wow Kumar nice craftsmanship canít wait for you to put the power to that creation. ĎCourse you may have to make a few cuts here and there.

Frank

Country: USA | Posts: 5858 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 04/16/2017 :  1:33:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
WOW! An advanced course on filing and fitting rail if I ever saw one!


Country: USA | Posts: 3792 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 04/16/2017 :  5:53:53 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks all.

I'm taking the day off modeling (while reading Iain Rice's 1980's book on British Finescale track) and I'm basking in the relief of getting this part of the project over. I'll start the two supporting turnouts tomorrow.

Regarding the cuts. I haven't wanted to think too far ahead but now that I'm done with this part I've given this a little thought. It seems that only two corners have connecting opposite poles (top right and bottom left) but nevertheless I'll have to put cuts into each track of the crossover. The key is to make them as tiny as possible and/or find a way to fill them with a non-conducting filler. Ties will also have to be gapped but they will be filled in before painting. I have some very thin blades but if I can find a cutting tool that uses some kind of razor thin wire then that will solve the problem of conspicuous gaps in the rails.


Compared to Tim Warris's amazing work mine still looks somewhat crude and messy:

but I still have a lot of filing, sanding and general cleaning up to do so let's see how it all looks once that is done.

Thanks for the feedback all.


http://thedepotonline.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 04/16/2017 :  8:00:02 PM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tim cut his ties down the middle, have you considered cutting close to one side so they donít look so conspicuous? Whatever the course, I'm sure you're up to the challenge.

Frank

Edited by - Frank Palmer on 04/16/2017 8:01:52 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 5858 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 04/16/2017 :  10:23:26 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kumar,

Some fine trackwork there. It all seems to fit together neatly.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 6343 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/16/2017 :  10:46:14 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I've used both fine-tooth razor saws and motor tool cutoff disks to gap rails in these circumstances. The razor saw has a narrower
kerf, but it's very difficult to avoid gouging the ties (or other rails) on either side of the cut. Cutoff disks are .025 thick (2" HO),
but don't put much shear force on the rail. Both need clear space on one or both sides of the cut; the cutoff disk only about 5/8" but
it's symmetrical around the rail being cut. There are places in Tim's diamond above where only a Jeweler's Saw or Electrical Discharge
Machining setup could make gaps (if they're required, I haven't done that computation). Neither could be used after installation. I
can't say how much weaker the assembly would be if gapped before installation.

Either way, styrene strip is an OK gap filler. Choose some that's about as thick as the tool cutting the gap and at least as wide as
the railhead. I put it in the gap with glue, then nip it off the strip with sprue cutters. File it down to the outline of the rail head
after the glue sets.



Country: USA | Posts: 6469 Go to Top of Page
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