Railroad Line Forums - The Depot (at Carendt)
Railroad Line Forums
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Sponsors   Support the RRLine   Guestbook   FAQ     Register
Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Live Chat | Avatar Legend | Search | Statistics
Photo Album | File Lister | File Library
[ Active Members: 1 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 109 ]  [ Total: 110 ]  [ Newest Member: jfields ]
 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Micro & Mini Layouts
 The Depot (at Carendt)
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Author Previous Topic: The Town Topic Next Topic: Beginn of a german Railroad Time 1960
Page: of 39

tloc
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/31/2015 :  11:29:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Words are not enough, but it is absolutely fantastic--excellent job

TomO



Country: USA | Posts: 3050 Go to Top of Page

Cowboybilly
Crew Chief

Posted - 08/01/2015 :  12:17:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Outstanding good


Country: Germany | Posts: 786 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/01/2015 :  08:01:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote



Country: USA | Posts: 12960 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/01/2015 :  08:04:24 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The photos with the backdrop in place say it all.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 15240 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/03/2015 :  2:59:36 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks all. Of course all I see are problems. More pictures to come. I'm removing the backdrop this week to finishing tidying up. I'll post something about the track laying tomorrow.

http://thedepotonline.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

andykins
Fireman

Posted - 08/03/2015 :  3:13:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit andykins's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Damn that is moody.

I don't like it. for the following reasons.

1. It's not on30
2. it isn't mine :P


Petty rivet counting aside the backdrop is fantastic, one flaw, you should have told us you hand painted it :P i'd have believed you!


Question! Yard crane, is it a Peco kit?



Country: United Kingdom | Posts: 4279 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/04/2015 :  12:22:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by andykins

Damn that is moody.

I don't like it. for the following reasons.

1. It's not on30
2. it isn't mine :P


Petty rivet counting aside the backdrop is fantastic, one flaw, you should have told us you hand painted it :P i'd have believed you!


Question! Yard crane, is it a Peco kit?



Ha ha, I wish I could paint that well. I'm actually a lousy painter - my wife said that I paint just about as well as my six year old daughter. (Thanks luv!).

Luckily I know Photoshop very well (I'm a web developer) and was able to use the painting filters. The backdrop was done in ten minutes - too quickly actually and I need to take more time next time.

However the clouds look like an angry Koala bear about to strike and they detract from the layout. There are other small issues with the backdrop that I won't bore anyone with. The upshot is that I may redo it and try to improve the look of the storm clouds. I'm maxed out on budget for the backdrop ($60 per print) so I'll get to it next month.

The crane is a Wills/Peco crane bought on Ebay from one of the various US Peco suppliers. I wanted something slightly different from the USA cranes. It was made for 4mm scale but looks just fine.

Angry koala bear!



http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 08/08/2015 2:43:51 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 08/05/2015 :  2:44:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kumard, The colors of the backdrop are great and like you noted, really match the coloring of the scene...

...

...but I'm glad that you are redoing it eventually. Not because of the dramatic approaching storm - that looks spectacular!! - except for the kaleidoscope effect where the image was reversed and repeated. I'll bet you can fiddle with Photoshop and get rid of the symmetry so you still have the great storm brewing without the angry koala lurking in the background :)



Country: USA | Posts: 2683 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/05/2015 :  3:35:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Gill

but I'm glad that you are redoing it eventually. Not because of the dramatic approaching storm - that looks spectacular!! - except for the kaleidoscope effect where the image was reversed and repeated. I'll bet you can fiddle with Photoshop and get rid of the symmetry so you still have the great storm brewing without the angry koala lurking in the background :)



Yes that was my first attempt. I have a much better version already done. Sometimes you just have to keep trying till you get it right. Thanks for the feedback. Much appreciated.


http://thedepotonline.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

Mario Rapinett
Fireman



Posted - 08/05/2015 :  5:21:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Frank Palmer

EXCELLENT !



Ditto




Country: Australia | Posts: 5846 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/06/2015 :  1:00:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I found these photos of the development period from a few years ago. They demonstrate my track laying method. The only thing I would say now is that I would probably not do it this way. I researched track-laying a little but came to the conclusion that I needed to do it in my own strange way. Now admittedly at times tracklaying felt like having teeth extracted but the result, although not without many problems, was in fact very rewarding. I felt that moving forward I now had complete freedom to create a track design anyway I liked and the ability to detail the track in ways that are more challenging with pre-made flexible track.

I'm not expecting many to read this or follow these steps but here they are anyway, I'll add pictures to these steps at some point:

Test Track


  1. I built a test track to figure out how to cut, lay and wire up the turnouts

  2. Watching my little locomotive trundle up and down this track was very satisfying and gave me the confidence I needed to hand lay the track





Track Design


  1. I used a single rail to mark out the center line. I used the natural bend of the rail to establish easements so that I got a nice flow of curves extending out.

  2. I created a tool that allowed me to pencil in the two parallel rails either side of the center line.





Tie Production and Gluing Down


  1. I purchased wood to make ties and then heavily marked and weathered them using a grated knife edge and my weathering pen.

  2. I stained and cut the ties various lengths.

  3. I created a tool to help me space the ties and used tape to pick up and stick down the ties.

  4. I laid the ties down with wood glue.



I built this tool to help me space the ties. Once spaced I used tape to lift the ties up and place down on the glued area.


Tie Weathering and landscaping


  1. I then spread woodland scenic foam putty around and over the ties which I then dug out tie by tie to create the rich variety of ground profiles on heavily weathered and poorly maintained track.

  2. I then painted the putty and tried to make sure I didn't paint the ties.

  3. I then added grit, dirt, and ballast on top of the profile.

  4. I then hand colored the ties using my fingers dipped in chalks.



Two years ago:


Two years later:


Track Laying


  1. Then I started laying rail.

  2. I started with the outer rails (the running and stock rails)

  3. Then I worked the inner running rails to the frogs.

  4. I joined the points of the frogs in place and soldered them.

  5. Then I created the remaining components heels, check rails, wings, points etc.

  6. I spiked all the track including the frogs.

  7. Then I added the point motors.





Steps 1-5 can be done in Templot. It is a software program for designing track layouts and also allows you to print out the track at exact scale. I haven't yet mastered it but will be using it for my next layout.

Problems:


  1. Using spikes - this gave me problems at the turnouts and specially at the frogs. I decided that next time I would use either copper-plated ties or ties with holes drilled in them containing screws to solder the rail to. Spikes are good for helping position rail but should be removed once the rail is secure.

  2. The curve of the rail opposite the frog and the frog itself. Although clearances are greater than on the prototype I found that the frog and the check rail opposite must be straight otherwise rolling stock will derail. I tried to fix those issues and stock does travel across the frogs but it is touch and go sometimes (probably not unlike the prototype on this sort of track)



http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 08/09/2015 3:10:36 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/06/2015 :  2:33:02 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I've hand-laid most of my present layout, plus a good deal of track at a club years ago, so I'm always curious. If this is your first attempt, congratulations, you've probably gotten the idea that many forum members like your work. But if you're thinking over techniques anticipating the next thing you'll build, it might help to browse the Model Railroad Construction forum, particularly 'Subroadbed, Roadbed & Track' ( http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=3878 ) and the 'AP Civil Support Thread' ( http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=24798 ).

I'll have to take a look at the Woodland Scenics foam putty, I've never noticed it when looking at the rack in a hobby shop.

I've used Code 70 and 83 on my HO layout and had no problem with Micro Engineering 'Small' spikes except that I wish they'd adjust their machine to make the 'head' shorter - the old Railcraft spikes were just right. Code 55 with RP-25 flanges requires ME 'Micro' spikes. Pre-drill or you'll bend half of them. I also used 'Micro' for the 4 spikes/tie required when detailing trackwork for the NMRA Achievement Program.

Personally, I find it easier to design and lay out track with curved frogs than straight, though I'll concede straight frogs are much more common on the prototype. Mine are reliable, though it probably helps that I fill the frog with solder and cut out the flangeways with an old hacksaw blade. This supports the wheel flange as it crosses the opening ahead of the point.



Country: USA | Posts: 5940 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/07/2015 :  12:29:33 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
James,

Yes first attempt at track laying. It was a good experience and a solid foundation to build upon.

I'll take a look at the MRC forum for more info. Other sources online are the Fastracks website (https://www.handlaidtrack.com/) where I purchased some supplies and also Central Valley (http://www.cvmw.com/). I'm going to go 'deeper' into track laying for my next project and will try to use more track laying components for a more accurate and reliable result.

My big issue with most track is the lack of attention to the ground profiles around the ties. As mentioned on previous posts the surrounding elements whether they be ballast, dirt or whatever can sit above, below and at the same level as the ties or even rail. I've seen many a picture where the rails are almost completely buried by earth or grass or ballast. Of course a few modellers try to model this and I too tried. My technique was to use Woodland Scenic's foam putty - normally used for landscape - to shape the earth in and around the ties which I would then color, stain and cover with grass or dirt. It worked fine and I'll probably do it again on the next layout.

As far as spikes and rail are concerned, I had not heard of 'small' or 'micro' spikes. I'll purchase some and see how they look. I'm not keen to use copper plated ties because of the lack of wood grain on top. I've never used the hole-punched-ties-with-copper-rivets technique but it looks promising (I'm going to do a test with those soon).

Lastly with frogs. I tried to figure out why rolling stock was having such a hard time with the frogs and came to the conclusion that curved frogs were the issue. By using Templot (http://www.templot.com/) to accurately draw out the rail I hope to avoid this issue in the future. I'm glad to hear that curved frogs were no problem for you because I really don't want to be restricted by straight frogs when planning and designing track work. I'll try soldering and cutting the flangeways in the manner you described.


http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 08/07/2015 3:26:47 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/07/2015 :  12:49:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very interesting information on hand laying, Kumard. I've messed around building turnouts with clad ties using Fast Tracks printed templates. I haven't yet put any on a layout though.

I like the results you get using the Woodland Scenics foam putty - very realistic. Like James, I've never heard of the stuff before. I gotta check it out.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 15240 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/07/2015 :  12:49:53 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I have a weekend's worth of work to do on the layout: mainly touching up grass and ground covering, digging out, weathering and staining ties, and adding more grit and dirt. I'm trying to get the layout to 'pop' more under natural lighting because things are looking very flat. I had always intended to go over these areas once the main modelling was over since they had originally been left half done.

The nice thing about small layouts is the ability to work with them on the work bench when necessary. With the assistance of my very patient wife I've moved it to the bench for the weekend.


I've marked out areas for attention with little pins. No need to make notes.



http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 08/07/2015 2:22:40 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 39 Previous Topic: The Town Topic Next Topic: Beginn of a german Railroad Time 1960  
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Previous Page | Next Page
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-19 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 1.25 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000