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Author Previous Topic: The Town Topic Next Topic: Beginn of a german Railroad Time 1960
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kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 12/03/2015 :  12:10:06 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tony >>

I've just been poring over the photos of your wonderful layout - again! You've done a fantastic job of creating a truly realistic scene. >> Thank you!!

One of the elements that helps it to work is that you've provided a viewing aperture in your proscenium arch that isn't too low. Can I ask what the height of the aperture is?

>> The height is 18 inches. I believe that the height was an Iain Rice recommendation. It means that I can photo the layout from very wide angles and distances and still not have the top of the sky show - important if trying to portray the big skies of the upper Midwest.

Connected with this is the fact that you've made the bottom of your frame deeper than the top, which avoids the top-heavy appearance that many layouts framed in this way seem to suffer from.

>> The bottom was built this way in order to create the cut out well at the front. The balanced effect with the frame was unintended but as you say it has worked well.

Thanks for sharing your inspirational work, >> TY - More to come.

One lighting area I missed was the front of the depot building. It's too dark. In the future I will curve the archway towards the viewer in order to light buildings near the front.


http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 12/03/2015 7:45:42 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 12/03/2015 :  12:30:11 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Doc >> "I work in rural Kentucky and we have a saying "trains, trucks, tractors, school buses, and Mennonites" to explain why we run late to work and meetings." >> I had to think what a Mennonite was for a moment and then I remembered a train journey to Chicago (from Oakland) a couple of years ago. One car was taken up completely by a group of passengers wearing traditional clothing, pudding bowl haircuts (the men) and bonnets (the ladies). They can travel by train but not cars or buses (another passenger told me). Fascinating. They were called Amish or Mennonite. I don't know if they have communities in the upper Midwest but it would be fun to put a horse and cart (and Mennonite) on the layout every now and then.

Frank >> "Maybe if the trees weren’t so much soldiers in a row." >> Agreed, they need to be broken up a little otherwise they would look a little monolithic. Also the color is very important and a block of dark green may not work. I'm leaning towards the populars (light green) behind the concrete driveway but making them a variety of sizes and shapes. They would be in a row because they would have been planted that way to provide a wind break. Here's another Photoshop test to see if that would work:


James >> "In the Great Plains, when I've seen spruces anywhere or cottonwoods away from river bottomlands, " >> I ought to try other tree types. I can download them into Photoshop and play around them easily enough. I'll try to find spruces and cottonwoods and also look up typical Midwest trees. If planted then they don't have to be native to the area but they do need to be able to survive the elements.

Thanks all for the feedback. Very helpful.


http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 12/24/2015 4:45:40 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/03/2015 :  1:41:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Cottonwood and poplar are closely related; I'm not good enough at trees to tell one from the other at a distance of 50 feet, except by what part of the country they are growing in. The narrow, brushy 'Lombardy Poplar' has a very distinctive shape but it's another close relative, also widely planted as a windbreak.


Country: USA | Posts: 6469 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 12/03/2015 :  2:17:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jbvb

Cottonwood and poplar are closely related; I'm not good enough at trees to tell one from the other at a distance of 50 feet, except by what part of the country they are growing in. The narrow, brushy 'Lombardy Poplar' has a very distinctive shape but it's another close relative, also widely planted as a windbreak.



James thanks.

The Lombardy Poplar looks ideal. The color is right and the branches start low on the trunk and yes it seems that they are also used as a wind break. They should be easy to model and I may try to put one together this weekend.



I also found this site. There is plenty of online information about windbreak trees. I'll research more over the weekend.

http://www.windbreaktrees.com/wind_types.html


http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 12/03/2015 3:54:48 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 12/03/2015 :  10:10:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote

Caboose


My caboose arrived today and I wasted no time in adding it to the train. The Soo Line had several caboose types in a range of colors that included the classic red and white. I however I opted for the brown scheme (or is it box car red?) in order to reduce the amount of red in the scene.

I just have one more item of rolling stock to arrive - an Illinois Central grain hopper - and once added the cross-country freight train working the branch will be fully assembled. Now all I have to do is finish the detailing on the locomotive and complete weathering of the remaining cars.





http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 12/23/2015 12:55:08 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

Miles
Crew Chief

Posted - 12/04/2015 :  04:33:34 AM  Show Profile  Visit Miles's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kumard,

I just had an idea for the new fuel tank. Atlas sells replacement tanks for EMD locomotives, why not splice two together? If I remember correctly the air tanks are case metal, so you can just file or cut the ends off and cover them with the new fuel tank pieces.



Country: | Posts: 514 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 12/04/2015 :  12:48:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Miles

Kumard,

I just had an idea for the new fuel tank. Atlas sells replacement tanks for EMD locomotives, why not splice two together? If I remember correctly the air tanks are case metal, so you can just file or cut the ends off and cover them with the new fuel tank pieces.



Miles,

As you mentioned the frame has been cast as a single metal piece and I will need to file down the air tanks to fit a fuel tank extension. I'll look into it in the New Year. I've made a few small errors in this little project that I will have to live with and the tanks may have to live on that list for a while.



http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 12/04/2015 1:02:23 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 12/06/2015 :  9:34:54 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
While I wait for my locomotive supplies to arrive I decided to weather another freight car. This time it was the 40' Soo Line boxcar. This was my second attempt at weathering and I think I'm starting to get the hang of it. This boxcar is from Kadee and has quickly become my favorite piece of rolling stock. It's just so well made with wealth of detail and sharp well defined edges. The trucks and the wheels are metal and have a working suspension. Although it's one of the nicest models I've ever owned I had no reservations about covering the body shell with dust powder, rust and paint to get it to look like an old worn piece of equipment.

I did a quick test to help me focus on areas needing more attention. The doors need more rust on them and I need to try to erase any evidence of a giant human hand having played a part in weathering this old vehicle. Anything that looks like a brush stroke or pencil line will have to be worked on further and as you can see there are still several areas like that.


I made some further color adjustments and added more rust. I'll keep working on this side this week.







http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 12/24/2015 4:50:51 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

Grabnet
Crew Chief



Posted - 12/06/2015 :  10:23:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow, that is extremely realistic!! The lighting is also perfect and really pops the details of the weathering. VEry nice.

Doc Tom



Country: USA | Posts: 673 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 12/06/2015 :  11:22:39 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
You have a really good eye for color. Excellent rust effects and grunge on those cars.
Mike
_____________________________________________________________________


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 6343 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/07/2015 :  08:17:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That weathering job is as good as it gets!



Country: USA | Posts: 13185 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/07/2015 :  08:46:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kumar, your Soo boxcars sure look like they've seen a lot of service. Very well done.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16062 Go to Top of Page

rca2
Engine Wiper

Posted - 12/07/2015 :  11:21:21 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The details are great, but seeing them in context is amazing. I keep coming back to your wider shots. Love the colors and gray skys.

Modeling Arizona Eastern Railroad, Hayden Junction (1920), in On30

Edited by - rca2 on 12/07/2015 11:21:53 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 463 Go to Top of Page

kumard
Engine Wiper

Posted - 12/07/2015 :  12:09:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit kumard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks all. Means alot especially coming from such excellent modelers.

I worked from Morning Sun color guides. I can't show you the original images (for copyright reasons) but most of the books, although they focus on locomotives, also have the odd freight car shot from the side. Some even have rolling stock sections and it was from the Monon Railroad album (http://morningsunbooks.com/products/monon-in-color) that I was able to get most of the weathering features I required. I photographed the pictures I needed using my iPhone and then I placed the phone next to me while I worked.

I picked out weathering features that wanted such as the vertical paint streaks from the lettering, rust patterns and dirt patterns. I'm still learning techniques (how to apply washes, how to apply rust, how to replicate paint streaks) so what you are looking at is me just experimenting. In some cases actually went too far: I sprayed the whole of the side with a dirt wash and accidentally faded the lettering too much. The lettering is a powerful statement on the side of the car and I wanted to retain that. Overspraying the dirt lost much of that effect and the result is that the side is more weathered than I wanted.

However I have the other side to do this week and if it comes out more satisfactory then that will be the side that I will display.

More weathered than I wanted, the Soo Line lettering is a powerful statement and it has been lost beneath the dirt:


I'll work on this side today, I have already added the first of several washes:


The Morning Sun color guides are very helpful for this kind of work. I buy and sell these books on Ebay:




http://thedepotonline.com/

Edited by - kumard on 12/10/2015 3:56:07 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 435 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/07/2015 :  12:55:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
One thing the pictures of the maroon Soo Line boxcar bring out is the detail differences between it and the white Soo boxcars. The latter have molded-on grabs and a considerably thicker running board.


Country: USA | Posts: 6469 Go to Top of Page
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