Railroad Line Forums - New York Mill - Modeled in Balsa Foam
Railroad Line Forums
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Sponsors   Support the RRLine   Guestbook   FAQ     Register
Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Live Chat | Avatar Legend | Search | Statistics
Photo Album | File Lister | File Library
[ Active Members: 8 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 80 ]  [ Total: 88 ]  [ Newest Member: SandersReview ]
 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Startin' from Scratch
 New York Mill - Modeled in Balsa Foam
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Author Previous Topic: Mystery Scratchbuild Topic Next Topic: Zenith Radio
Page: of 34

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/06/2017 :  7:35:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello Kris', very happy to see you back in action and obviously feeling much better .
Very nice deposition on your current project. Enjoy your 'chopper 3'...



Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 6057 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/06/2017 :  8:15:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris,
I too am happy that you posted again, and I do hope you're feeling better.
Thanks for the "how-to" on the gray toned wash, I will have to try it. Karl Osolinski also used Dr. Phil Martin's inks to make washes, although I can't find any references to how much was used and thinned. I have most of the inks, but no transparent mediums. I will have to experiment with what I currently have.
Your color choice is good.
Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4592 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 04/06/2017 :  9:17:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Kris, glad you're enjoying modeling again.


Country: USA | Posts: 3048 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/07/2017 :  12:20:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm glad to see you feeling better.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5656 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 04/07/2017 :  11:23:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris good to see you back at the table.

A signal your up and feeling much better.

Did you get my last two emails????


Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 12521 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/10/2017 :  2:45:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks all for the comments and input. I apologize for the delay in posting.

Rich;
Just a thought about the use of the Dr. Ph. Martins inks. In my experience I have found that the properties between the inks and watercolors allow for a difference in application(s). I have found that the inks are more effective when one wants to change the color hue of the wood and the watercolors more useful when one wants to modify or accent the tones within a color.

The difference is that I have found that I use the inks, which are more semi-transparent when dry, to add general coloring to wood. But if I want to just change or modify the color tone, the lightness or darkness of a color, then I have found that the watercolors offer more control and appear to be a better medium choice due to how transparent the watercolor is. Thus, I have found that I have started applying the watercolors over inks to accent the wood and attain the color I'm after. As you're for sure in the advanced class of modelers, I thought that you might find this comment of interest.

Gluing the Stringer Components Together:
Now, let's talk about some basic gluing techniques/tip. I used two different sizes of paper spring clips when laminating the stringer pieces together. I used weaker spring clips as clamps on the ends of the stringers with larger and stronger spring clips towards the middle of the stringers to apply pressure across a larger area. I clamped my stringers together while drying in this fashion to allow the stringer strip wood to expand or contract at the ends of the stringers, hopefully decreasing the amount of possible bowing experienced while the lamination pieces dry.


Different sized paper spring clips used as clamps.

Wow, that was tough, turning 12 sticks of wood into 4 sticks of wood. Think I'm ready for the next step.

Coloring the Bridge Ties:
I wanted my bridge ties to look like they have seen better days. I also wanted to carry the mild brown-orange tone of the stringers through to the underlying hue of the ties. The idea here is to lay down the base coloring, then grain the ties so the graining edges will catch the light gray tone of the highlighting solution. This solution will also need to accent the grain of the ties.
Note that the 7 x 9 inch ties are actual pine, not basswood. This was another reason for my change in the coloring sequence used.

1) I had an old jar of 'brown' stain. It appeared to be a water and acrylic paint mix. I'm not exactly sure of the mix, but I believe it to be Mike Chamber's "Brown-Grey #2" http://rustystumps.com/RSSMDownloads/Staining%20Stripwood.pdf which can be found on the Rusty Stumps Scale Models web site. It is located in the How-To Articles, Mike Chambers Staining and Weathering Stripwood, Part I. Thanks Walt!
2) Soak the ties for 18 hours in the Brown-Grey #2 solution, turning the ties frequently. I used an old Altoids tin to hold the stain and ties. When needed, I used a toothpick to turn the ties and stir the solution.
3) Remove the ties from the stain and blot with a paper towel to remove excess and heavy pigmented stain.
4) I again used the stain close to the Dr. Ben's Hard Wood Maple #1083. The stain was applied using a #5 round sable and a stippling motion to mop the tie. The ties were colored in the Altoids tin where the excess stain from the stippling motion colored the bottom side of the tie via capillary action. I set the ties aside to dry.
5) I wanted a lot of heavy graining and the tie ends really chewed up. Thus, I used a 1/2-inch wide wire paint scraping brush to add the grain. https://www.uline.com/Product/Detail/S-20188/Abrasives/Curved-Handle-Wire-Brush-1-2-x-7-3-4?pricode=WY473&gadtype=pla&id=S-20188&gclid=CjwKEAjw2qzHBRChloWxgoXDpyASJAB01Io0eMaUAXDwFy09BtSD3jeT0tPrOEIYrucjHEQoQV28dhoCiO3w_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds Only a couple of passes of the wire brush over the ends are required, otherwise too much of the existing finish is removed.
6)Weather-It (no longer available) produces more of a sooty-weathered look to my eye than the Silverwood product, which appears more of a water beaten weathered effect. So I chose to use the Weather-It product, although I feel the Silverwood product could be substituted.
7) I used a paper towel folded into quarters to make a pad. Onto this pad I poured a bit of well mixed Weather-It.
8) I then rolled the individual ties across the wet pad to impart some of the weathering solution to all faces and edges of the ties. As I removed the ties from the pad to be placed aside for drying, I tapped each end of the ties onto the damp pad to add some solution to the tie ends. This process goes quickly as you can use the palm of your hand to roll 4 or 5 ties over the moist pad at a time. Set the ties aside to dry.

As I did not achieve the desired results, additional weathering of the ties became necessary.
9) Using a file card, I again grained all surfaces of the ties, making sure to brush/move the file card from off of the flat surface onto the tie and over the tie surface. This was to further chew-up the ends of the ties. You can speed up this process by doing about 4 ties at a time.
10) The ties were again rolled on a moist paper towel pad. This time Silverwood was the staining solution used. The ties were again set aside to dry.

Well, that's about it for today as the old laptop is starting to get power hungry. I'll continue tomorrow with the coloring of the N-B-w's and the final dressing of the ties.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 04/10/2017 4:58:45 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7237 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 04/10/2017 :  3:59:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just an excellent tutorial Kris.



Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 12521 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/10/2017 :  9:52:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris,
Many thanks for your clarification of Dr. Ph Martin's inks and watercolor solutions. I will have to experiment using both. I'm currently working on another structure that won't be colored at all, bare wood, and we will see if your method will enhance the underlying wood grain. I want to surface color the walls, not saturate them.
Also, I see you made a comment about me, putting me in the class of "advanced " Modelers! Now that is a rewarding statement, and one that no one would be taking lightly, especially coming from you. Thanks, that is far better than any one award given at any train show!
I'm glad to see you posting again, hope you're feeling better.
Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4592 Go to Top of Page

kebmo
Fireman



Posted - 04/10/2017 :  11:13:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
glad to see you back on the forum and modeling again. i hope all's well.


Country: USA | Posts: 1733 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 04/11/2017 :  08:21:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ditto what kebmo said!


Country: USA | Posts: 3795 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/11/2017 :  5:09:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks as always to everyone who dropped by and also for the comments given. Please remember, this is your thread as well, and your input is valued to all who read these postings. So any and all comments are more than welcome.

Before I forget, I did not note yesterday that when I laminated the 3 pieces of wood together to form the stringer that I did not allow for the space between the stringer components. If you wanted, you could place a 1-inch (or maybe 2-inch) spacer between the stringer components. This space was to allow for water to pass through the bridge components. As the 1-inch space in HO scale is so small and would probably not be seen in the completed structure, I did not add the detail. This omission is also suggested in the kit instructions. Just a 'heads-up' should someone be building a bit stricter prototype model.

Color the N-B-W's:
Before starting to prep the N-B-W's for coloring, I added a couple of additional sprues of castings from my stock. I obtain the N-B-W's in bulk from Black Bear Scale Models. http://www.blackbearcc.com/NBWs.html

The desired look for the N-B-W's is a lighter rust primary color and some darker textured rust in some areas of the individual N-B-W casting.

1) Clean and trim the actual castings on the sprue as needed with a knife and a emery board for baby nails.
2) Clean the castings of mold release etc. I just throw my casting sprues into a bottle of clean ETOH and let them sit for a few days. (I think that these actually sat in the ETOH for over a week.) After a few days, take the castings out of the ETOH with tweezers and allow to air dry on a paper towel pad.
3) The castings were colored with Vallejo Light Rust #301, Panzer Aces line of model colors. The paint was lightly diluted with Golden Airbrush Medium http://www.dickblick.com/products/golden-airbrush-mediums/?clickTracking=true&wmcp=pla&wmcid=items&wmckw=25321-1008&gclid=CjwKEAjw_bHHBRD4qbKukMiVgU0SJADr08ZZ2mgDfl3W0qvLIXmQ1MHQLPL6vke_CsHE7Zs4KPT3TBoClBjw_wcB as the acrylic paint was applied with a #2 round sable brush. Set aside to cure dry.
Note:Cure dry is important here as Vallejo is a soft paint and requires an extended amount of time to 'cure' dry. I always allow at least 2 full days for Vallejo to cure dry. Vallejo paint, once dry is pretty durable. The Vallejo paint may be 'dry' to the touch within 30 minutes to an hour, but you will lose your coat of paint if you get the applied paint overly wet prior to the paint actually 'curing'. As we will be immersing the sprue and castings into a solution in the next step, you really need a cured coating of paint.
3) Dunk the casting sprues with N-B-W's into a light A-I wash. Drain on a paper towel pad and set aside to dry.
4) Dunk the casting sprues into well mixed Rustall. http://www.rustall.com/ Set aside to 'cure' dry.
5) Dunk the casting sprues into well mixed Rustall Blackwash. (I often think of it as a 'bluing' agent.) Set aside on a paper towel to dry.
6) Dunk the castings sprues into Rustall Deadflat. You could also use a Dullcoat over spray if desired instead of the Deadflat.


Colored N-B-W castings and bridge ties

Adding More Grey to the Bridge Ties:
I wanted the bridge ties to show more solid light grey like water beaten weathered wood prior to the silvering effect. To obtain this look on the working bridge, I returned to Jerry's ideas and thought about the use of Folquil Driftwood (Yes... I still have a few bottles) but could not find my DioSol to thin the Driftwood stain. So.. I had to opt for a different medium and technique.

Since I wanted an opaque coloring applied to the ties, primarily on the edges, I opted for a diluted craft paint. I used Delta Ceramcoat Drizzle Gray https://plaidonline.com/products/delta-ceramcoat-acrylic-paint-drizzle-grey-2-oz
which I diluted with Golden Airbrush Medium to about a 50:50% solution: paint:airbrush medium.

1) Using a paper towel pad, moisten the pad with the grey paint solution. You don't want the pad saturated, so blot as needed to remove excess paint.
2) Doing 4 to 5 ties at a time, roll the ties across the moist paint pad with the palm of your hand and using light to medium pressure. The idea here is to apply most of the accent paint to the sharp edges of the ties, with only random spotting of the tie face surfaces. Remember that the paint will become much more pronounced as the paint dries.
3) Make sure to tap the tie ends onto the paint pad prior to setting the ties aside to dry.





Well, not quite the coloring I wanted, but the final weathering applications during final assembly should bring the various components into the general color and weathering effects which I want. The ties will become darker when soot is applied and some of the gray will fade into the background. A bit worried about the stringers however as they came out a bit darker then desired and will be in a shadow. Just hoping that the stringers are not too dark for the future weathering.

Well, that wraps it up for today. As always, comments to the good, bad and ugly are welcome.

As


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 04/12/2017 6:58:30 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7237 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 04/12/2017 :  12:12:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris I think with the soot added and the rails in place you'll have hit it right on the head.

Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 12521 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 04/12/2017 :  07:40:53 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kris,

Your bridge ties look appropriately beaten up, but not too much so. I agree with Jerry that once you apply soot they will look good.

Thank you for lots of info.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 6368 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/12/2017 :  3:26:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Rich for the e-mail about my not being able to find the DioSol thinner. Rich pointed out that the Xylene product 'Klean Strip' may be substituted for the DioSol. The product can be found at the local hardware store or home improvement center like Home Depot.


Picture provided by Rich

Per an old thread on this site about a substitute for Floquil Diosol; http://railroad-line.com/discussion/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=29861&whichpage=2

"According to the MSDS dated 2/9/2005, Dio-Sol consists of:
VM&P Naptha 40-45%
Xylol (Xylene) 5-10%
Ethyl Benzene 1-5%
Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvent 5-10%
Light Aromatic Hydrocarbon 40-45%"

Klean-Strip Industrial Maintenance Coating Thinner is a mix of:
1. Light aliphatic solvent naphtha (petroleum)
2. Acetic acid, ethyl ester {Ethyl acetate}
3. Petroleum Hydrocarbons
4. 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene {Pseudocumene}
5. Xylene (mixed isomers) {Benzene, dimethyl-}

So one can easily see how the Klean Strip product would work. It may be that the old DioSol was just lightgly diluted and repackaged Klean Strip?

Some years ago I made up a couple of gallons of the DioSol mixture using Naptha, Xylene and Toluene, if I recall correctly. It appeared to work just like the DioSol.

Anyway, great tip Rich and thanks for the suggestion.

Add Dark Rust Spots to the N-B-W's:
This is a recycled technique which I have described in prior construction threads. The process is a way to add random small rust patches/spots on castings.

Since the N-B-w's castings are so small, the trick for this application is to make sure that the paint is pretty thin. To help the thinned paint adhere, I used Golden Airbrush Medium to thin the paint. The airbrush medium appears to add some additional acrylic binder, thus increasing the paint adhesion/coverage.

For the dark rust spots on the N-B-W castings I chose Burnt Sienna which has a slightly stronger red hue than Burnt Umber.

1) Thin Americana Burnt Sienna #DAO63 with Golden Airbrush Medium to the consistency of water. The mix ratio is about 1:9, paint:airbrush medium. Make sure the solution is well mixed. I used a total of 3 drops of paint and 28 drops of airbrush medium.
2) Using an old toothbrush, dip the brush into the paint and then tap the loaded toothbrush onto a paper towel pad to remove excess paint.
3) Use the thumb to spray a fine mist of paint globs over the N-B-W castings. I held the toothbrush about 4 to 5 inches from the castings/sprue while running my thumb over the toothbrush bristles.

On these small N-B-W castings the coloring effect is not large, but does slightly change the color of some of the castings. Thus, all of my N-B-W's will not be uniform in the rust tone when viewed on the structure. The technique creates a larger pitted-rusted areas effect on larger castings you may want to weather.

As my camera does not perform very well on the N-B-W castings, I'll not try to show you a picture of a painted sprue and attached castings. But the technique is worth playing with, esp. since this is a sandbox build.

Well, til the next update, enjoy your modeling activities, whatever they may be.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 04/12/2017 3:39:55 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7237 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/19/2017 :  11:24:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Quick question to the gang. Has anyone tried or heard of using the 'Klean Strip' product as a solvent in styrene modeling? I'm thinking that the product would probably work to melt the styrene at the joint/seam for a weak joint, but does it also continue to attack the styrene well after the application?

I'm mainly thinking of possibilities like using the solvent to remove and clean styrene surfaces after the addition of wood grain with sandpaper and/or wire brushes. I often use Bestine for this function but have always been looking for a slightly stronger solvent to remove the fuzzy stryene.

Thanks in advance for your comments.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 04/19/2017 11:38:58 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7237 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 34 Previous Topic: Mystery Scratchbuild Topic Next Topic: Zenith Radio  
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Previous Page | Next Page
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-2020 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.67 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000