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 The "Choices" Challenge (Jan-March 2015)
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Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/01/2015 :  08:30:52 AM  Show Profile
For the first Challenge of 2015, we thought that a few choices would give a wide range of members the opportunity to participate. So, look at the list of possible choices, choose the one(s) that tickle your fancy, and jump in the Challenge starting January 1st and running through March 31st!

Choice #1: Wood on Wheels.

There was a conversation on the Forum a few months back about the number of members who own wood rolling stock kits, but have hesitated to give them a try. So here is your opportunity to work with like-minded members and gain some insights into getting one of these classics on the rails.


Choice #2: The Smell of Sugar Pine.

Judging by the number of Campbell kits that you see for re-sale at Train Shows, Swap Meets and even here on the Forum, you have to wonder if majority of these Plaid Box Kits spend their entire existence going from one owner to the other, sitting on the shelf until they hit the Estate Sale or are once again traded off to a new owner. These kits obviously caught our fancy, so let’s see a few of them actually built during this Challenge!


Choice #3: One off the shelf.

Remember that kit that you couldn’t do without and now sits on the shelf? Or that kit next to it on the shelf that a friend or family member, gave you knowing that you are a modeler? Is that shelf starting to sag with the weight of all those kits? Why not pull one down, dust it off, and build it as part of the Challenge? (A picture of that shelf would be a bonus!)


Choice #4: Imagineering.


For the scratch builders in the group, the Challenge is to show fellow members the process you go through from the original concept, to the sketch or drawing, to the final construction of the model. Share the joy of scratch building with the entire crew.


You can post all of your progress photos and comment right in this thread.

Once done, please post a few "final pictures" in the thread dedicated to that purpose. Here is the link to that thread: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=44327


WELCOME ABOARD!!!

Country: USA | Posts: 31211

Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 01/01/2015 :  10:09:38 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage


Thanks so much, Bruce, for coming up with yet another great idea for our challenges. This should be a fun one as all the others have been!
Well, here's a shot of "some" of the kits I have on the shelf...and on the floor. Take note of the rectangular red box with the checkered pattern on it!



Yup, it's the only Campbell kit I own. I've never built one before so this build promises to present me with some new challenges, I'm sure. I'm heading in with a great deal of excitement and a touch of trepidation, for sure.



The kit is Hamilton's Dinghies Ltd. in HO Scale. Hopefully there might be a few forum members who have built this one already and who may have some good advice to provide. Later on, I'll open the box and show the contents. I'm diving in!


Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

Country: | Posts: 11492 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/01/2015 :  10:35:15 AM  Show Profile
Great choice, Mike. I have Hamilton's Dinghies in my stack, but have decided to go with DeWitt's Depository for the build. However, it will be renamed after on of our granddaughters.







Country: USA | Posts: 31211 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 01/01/2015 :  10:35:15 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage
Ok, I'll jump in here with my entry.

Having choosen, #4:Imagineering, my entry will be the construction of three electric boxcab's for my "to be" quarry railroad, an HO 30" gauge line.

My inspiration came from several places. The Gazette ran a couple of scratchbuild articles on electric boxcabs. Another was a Japaneese modeler by the name of Junior Yamachi.

Some of his work.

http://on30center.com/on30/library/articles/JrYamachi/es/es.html

http://on30center.com/on30/gallery/jryamachi/eml.html

Plus a couple of pictures from surfing the net.





They are going to be two axle boxcabs for hauling stone from the rock bunker to the yard were they will be assmbled into a train to be hauled to a standard gauge interchange. That will be another project, designing and building a bigger road locomotive to haul the stones over the so called main line. Hopefuly this explains the inspiration and the research for ideas.

I was orginaly going to scratchbuild the chassis but figured I'd never get anything built if I didn't use something that was already to set a super structure on. I came across these somehow.



I took some basic dimensions from the chassis and drew a couple of rectangles in my CAD program, printed it out and cut out the center to fit over the chassis.I drilled holes in the corners and used a fret saw to cut out the center





There are tabs on the side of the chssais that need to be shaved off to make the frame bottom fit over the motor.



Here's a concept mock-up of the boxcab, plus one next to a quarter showing relative size.






I based the width on 2 Maine Two Foot gauge equipment. The width is around 7'6". The length I picked an abrbitraiery figure of 16' which seemed to foit the chassi well. The cardboard mock up gives me some idea of what it will look like.

That's it for now. Spent the last couple of days rebuilding the main disk drive after a "Maleware Attack".

Next installment should show the floor for all three power units.

Bernd

P.S. I seem to behaving some picture problems here. Working on a fix.



Edited by - Bernd on 01/01/2015 12:54:53 PM

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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/01/2015 :  10:57:05 AM  Show Profile
Mike, I see you're going for the bonus points by showing your shelf of kits. I'm looking forward to seeing your build.

Bernd, that's an interesting build you've started. Is it going to be all brass?

George



Country: USA | Posts: 15146 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 01/01/2015 :  11:01:57 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by George D

Mike, I see you're going for the bonus points by showing your shelf of kits. I'm looking forward to seeing your build.

Bernd, that's an interesting build you've started. Is it going to be all brass?

George



Thanks George. Yes, it's going to be all brass. I will be using my CNC mill to do a majority of the work. It can also be done manually but with less accuracy in making multiple parts.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 3111 Go to Top of Page

Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 01/01/2015 :  11:21:26 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage
Hee Hee, George...what a great surprise to get bonus points even before the build!
Man, I thought I had a lot of kits to built, but I have friends who have 10 times the amount of unbuilt kits on their storage shelves...and I'm not mentioning rolling stock!

Bruce, I noticed that your Campbell Kit is No. 412 and mine is No. 394. This got me to thinking...did this company manufacture that many kits? So I did a google search on the company and just from the "images" alone...man were they prolific!
I know some of the kits were of bridges and other smaller structures, but I hadn't realized the sheer volume of their productions.

Bernd, you're off to a great start already. Looking forward to following along!


Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

Edited by - Mike Hamer on 01/01/2015 11:23:41 AM

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engineerkyle
Fireman



Posted - 01/01/2015 :  11:42:58 AM  Show Profile  Visit engineerkyle's Homepage
Mike...

The structure on the cover of your C.K. is a beaut. Can't wait to watch youR progress.

Bernard, those are cool proto photos. "n" scale seems beyond me.

As for myself. This rural scene has several challenges.





It is a huge structure, I use a little compression. First, six silos instead of nine. Shorten the building as per my sketch.




I've never heard of anyone successfully modeling silo tiles. I'd like to see a thread if one exists.

One end of the roof has a simple pitch, the other, over the silos, has a hip. It looks like a addition.

I'm not gonna be coy, the main model is done, and the full report can be seen on my blog. I will dole out more narrative on how I did it here on THE RAILROAD lINE, as I enjoy the others progress.

engineerkyle



Country: USA | Posts: 1050 Go to Top of Page

engineerkyle
Fireman



Posted - 01/01/2015 :  11:45:47 AM  Show Profile  Visit engineerkyle's Homepage
Oh, I'm choice number 4. Imagineering




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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/01/2015 :  12:09:12 PM  Show Profile
I will be participating in the challenge using category #4, Imagineering. My variation in this category will be the use of balsa foam as a modeling material. In theory, I could make the entire diorama, excluding dirt, foliage and water, from balsa foam.

As this is my first experiment with balsa foam, I’m not sure how much of the diorama will be carved from this material. As I have seen only limited use of the material here on the forum, I thought that it might be entertaining to examine balsa foam as a modeling material.

I must stress that this is a total experiment on my part. I have no sculpting experience and only very limited carving skills in plaster and foam. As such, I have no ideas where this build will take us. Please note that I may resolve to use traditional modeling materials in the build dependent on my comfort level with the balsa foam.

Balsa Foam as a Modeling Material:
Balsa-Foam is being used by a growing number of industrial designers and model builders. If one reviews the ‘gaming’ and ‘military’ modeling sites, you will note an increased use of this material. The increasing acceptance is because of how easily and quickly modelers can create detailed shapes in the material.

The material is also very light weight which makes it desirable for modular layouts and dioramas. This and the apparent ease of carving are my primary reasons for investigating the material for my modeling. I’m hoping that balsa foam is not as easily damaged as plaster and wood in transportation and at shows where unwanted stray fingers somehow always appear.

Balsa foam appears to be more tailored for the larger scales/projects than HO scale. It appears however to be able to take fairly fine detail, thus my interest in trying to develop some techniques which will allow me to use balsa foam in future modeling projects.

The Model:
I will attempt to create a model in HO scale of the New York Mill which was once located in Black Hawk, Colorado. I will be using plans drawn by Michael Blazek ( http://www.blazeksplan.com ) and pictures of the mill found on the web and in various books, such as Sundance’s “THE GILPIN RAILROAD ERA” volumes. ( http://sundancepubs.com/GilpinTram.html )

This mill was served by both the Gilpin Tram (2 foot gauge) and the C&S railroads. In addition, the mill was located directly on the bank of Clear Creek and had additional water access via a wooden flume.

The mill configuration is not what most modelers/people think of when one mentally visualizes a ‘stamp mill’. It was a typical stone structure but not placed/sited on a steep hillside.

For those interested, a few pictures (which one can zoom in for better views) and site plan of the mill can be viewed here:
http://gilpintram.com/newyorkmill.html

I chose this structure for a test trial of balsa foam as the modeling material for multiple reasons.
1) The structure has stone, concrete, wood and metal materials used in its construction. This provides an opportunity to see if I can reproduce some or all of these materials in the balsa foam with appropriate detailing in HO scale. The structure also has shapes including broken stone, round tubes and different variations of wood thickness to offer as carving/sculpting challenges.
2) I wanted to determine if my method of coloring stones used in the structure will work with balsa foam as the modeling material.
3) The structure overall is not a structure common to layouts or dioramas.
4) The structure has additional supporting structures, like the water flume, which may be made out of balsa foam or traditional modeling materials and add additional visual interest to the model. I’m hoping that this additional visual interest will limit the experimentation aspect of this build when viewing the completed diorama.
5) Openings (doors and window) within the structure are mostly very deep/wide. As I will be working with rather thick slabs of balsa foam, I suspect that this will become an advantage during the carving of the structure walls.

Detailed Build Thread:
I will be creating a separate build thread containing a step-by-step description of this ‘experiment’. The thread will be located in the Scratchbuilding forum and added to my “Sandbox” build series. A link to the thread is:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=44353

I will update this “Challenge” thread with periodic progress pictures of the build so as not to bury folks with my build information.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 01/03/2015 4:20:48 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7124 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 01/01/2015 :  1:02:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage
Mike,

quote:
Bernd, you're off to a great start already. Looking forward to following along!


Probably not fair, but I started on this last year. Now I have an incentive to get it done. Hopefully more success than on my structure build.

Kyle,

quote:
Bernd, those are cool proto photos. "n" scale seems beyond me.


Well, not really N scale, perhaps only in track size. The super structure will be in HO scale.

I'm working on getting the "new" 3 floors done today. Have the CNC mill all warmed up and ready to go.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 3111 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/01/2015 :  1:38:47 PM  Show Profile
Kyle, it'll be interesting to see how you do the silos.

Kris, I don't remember ever seeing anyone work with Balsa Foam. This will be fascinating to watch.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 15146 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 01/01/2015 :  2:49:33 PM  Show Profile
Hi Guys,
my modest first challenge in category #3 is a BTS watertank.


It will be placed at my Rock Bottom station between the team track and the depot, see the picture below. I have placed a jig from the kit and the water spout to assess best placement of tank. The team track will be shortened to accompany the tank. The white mass in the middle is to become a road causeway leading to the station from the outside world.


Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1725 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/01/2015 :  2:56:35 PM  Show Profile
Kris, there is a forum member, I think it is [Arizona Dave] has an extensive layout mostly made out of Balsa Foam. I have bought some, but waiting to see how you make out, then I'll give it a try....Good luck with the NY Mill'...I'll be watching'.

quote:
Originally posted by hon3_rr

I will be participating in the challenge using category #4, Imagineering. My variation in this category will be the use of balsa foam as a modeling material. In theory, I could make the entire diorama, excluding dirt, foliage and water, from balsa foam.

As this is my first experiment with balsa foam, I’m not sure how much of the diorama will be carved from this material. As I have seen only limited use of the material here on the forum, I thought that it might be entertaining to examine balsa foam as a modeling material.

I must stress that this is a total experiment on my part. I have no sculpting experience and only very limited carving skills in plaster and foam. As such, I have no ideas where this build will take us. Please note that I may resolve to use traditional modeling materials in the build dependent on my comfort level with the balsa foam.

Balsa Foam as a Modeling Material:
Balsa-Foam is being used by a growing number of industrial designers and model builders. If one reviews the ‘gaming’ and ‘military’ modeling sites, you will note an increased use of this material. The increasing acceptance is because of how easily and quickly modelers can create detailed shapes in the material.

The material is also very light weight which makes it desirable for modular layouts and dioramas. This and the apparent ease of carving are my primary reasons for investigating the material for my modeling. I’m hoping that balsa foam is not as easily damaged as plaster and wood in transportation and at shows where unwanted stray fingers somehow always appear.

Balsa foam appears to be more tailored for the larger scales/projects than HO scale. It appears however to be able to take fairly fine detail, thus my interest in trying to develop some techniques which will allow me to use balsa foam in future modeling projects.

The Model:
I will attempt to create a model in HO scale of the New York Mill which was once located in Black Hawk, Colorado. I will be using plans drawn by Michael Blazek ( http://www.blazeksplan.com ) and pictures of the mill found on the web and in various books, such as Sundance’s “THE GILPIN RAILROAD ERA” volumes. ( http://sundancepubs.com/GilpinTram.html )

This mill was served by both the Gilpin Tram (2 foot gauge) and the C&S railroads. In addition, the mill was located directly on the bank of Clear Creek and had additional water access via a wooden flume.

The mill configuration is not what most modelers/people think of when one mentally visualizes a ‘stamp mill’. It was a typical stone structure but not placed/sited on a steep hillside.

For those interested, a few pictures (which one can zoom in for better views) and site plan of the mill can be viewed here:
http://gilpintram.com/newyorkmill.html

I chose this structure for a test trial of balsa foam as the modeling material for multiple reasons.
1) The structure has stone, concrete, wood and metal materials used in its construction. This provides an opportunity to see if I can reproduce some or all of these materials in the balsa foam with appropriate detailing in HO scale. The structure also has shapes including broken stone, round tubes and different variations of wood thickness to offer as carving/sculpting challenges.
2) I wanted to determine if my method of coloring stones used in the structure will work with balsa foam as the modeling material.
3) The structure overall is not a structure common to layouts or dioramas.
4) The structure has additional supporting structures, like the water flume, which may be made out of balsa foam or traditional modeling materials and add additional visual interest to the model. I’m hoping that this additional visual interest will limit the experimentation aspect of this build when viewing the completed diorama.
5) Openings (doors and window) within the structure are mostly very deep/wide. As I will be working with rather thick slabs of balsa foam, I suspect that this will become an advantage during the carving of the structure walls.

Detailed Build Thread:
I will be creating a separate build thread containing a step-by-step description of this ‘experiment’. The thread will be located in the Scratchbuilding forum and added to my “Sandbox” build series. A link to the thread is:
(I will edit this with the appropriate link once the thread is generated in the near future.)

I will update this “Challenge” thread with periodic progress pictures of the build so as not to bury folks with my build information.





Country: USA | Posts: 5852 Go to Top of Page

mecrr
Engine Wiper



Posted - 01/01/2015 :  3:21:08 PM  Show Profile
I'm in, #3. This kit has been in the way of my starting my first SRMW kit build, so here goes.





David



A Maine Expatriate living in the valley of Northern California - Modeling in HO.
David Stickney

Edited by - mecrr on 01/01/2015 3:22:25 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 462 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 01/01/2015 :  4:20:52 PM  Show Profile
Mike, Håkan and David...those are three cool kits you all are about to build!

And three different manufacturers...I'll be checking on this thread and you're progress for sure..!



Country: USA | Posts: 3349 Go to Top of Page
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