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 Layout Room Flooring Options - Over Concrete
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Author Previous Topic: L&WS Construction Series Topic Next Topic: Orford and Orford Bay Railway Construction
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dlwrailfan1
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 09/04/2014 :  3:45:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit dlwrailfan1's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I searched the archives and found a few comments on what others have done. My basement is dry with a poured concrete floor that has been sealed. The walls are insulated sheetrock over a poured concrete wall.

What type of floor is a good choice? It should be durable, can take the abuse of construction (paint, spills, etc), good to walk around and comfortable during an op session.

Any and all comments are welcome!

Eric

Country: USA | Posts: 646

GregW66
New Hire

Posted - 09/04/2014 :  4:19:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I consulted a flooring shop when faced with this in my last home and they recommended a tough industrial carpet that they laid directly over the concrete with glue. I was only in the house for 5 years after the install but it held up well and was fairly comfortable underfoot.

For best comfort level I would build a subfloor raised by 2x2s over the concrete and floor with plywood and then industrial carpet.

GregW66



Country: Canada | Posts: 35 Go to Top of Page

visman48
Fireman



Posted - 09/04/2014 :  4:58:25 PM  Show Profile  Visit visman48's Homepage  Click to see visman48's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Eric,
I have a large room designed for trains and work, I put down industrial tile...so I could, if I needed to have legs on the RR. I also spill and so have the tile (not ceramic)and I make a mess clean up is easier. I do have the heavy rubber pads around the RR.

Les



Country: USA | Posts: 6031 Go to Top of Page

SNCF_Fan
Section Hand

Posted - 09/04/2014 :  7:30:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There are such a range of options it’s hard to make a recommendation without knowing just what you want to achieve. However to do the job “right” you will need both a sub-floor and a finish flooring material. If the basement is truly dry then a dricore sub-floor is not necessary and all you want to do is “soften” and warm the floor something such as insulfloor http://www.rona.ca/en/insulfloor-underlay-8798001 or the local equivalent gives you a warm floor which is much “softer” than the concrete slab. Once installed paint it with a good quality light coloured floor paint to keep the railroad room brighter and make cleanup easier during heavy benchwork construction. As this sub-floor is slightly “compressible” it is best to cut out ports for legs and other layout support structures, Once you have finished the “messy work” you can install any finish material (carpet, laminate flooring etc.,) you want over this. The only “problem” with insulfloor is that it does not “level” out the slab bur instead follows the slab contours. So if the slab has significant swales you might want to consider applying a levelling compound before installing the insulfloor.

Hope this helps a bit.

Thanks and Cheers


Carl

carl.lindon@videotron.ca
Gatineau, Quebec.

Country: Canada | Posts: 50 Go to Top of Page

BigLars
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 09/04/2014 :  7:37:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I used industrial carpet tile in my train room. 2x2 squares and have a few extras so if I spill or burn a piece I can pop the tile and replace it.

My current build:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=50375

Country: USA | Posts: 11209 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 09/04/2014 :  7:53:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My late brother the carpenter recommend the following, which I've done in two separate houses:
1. Create a grid (16" centers) using 1"x4" pressure treated lumber, ripped to 1x2 except on 4' x 8' boundaries. Glue this grid to the concrete, leaving gaps between the joints (to let the air circulate freely)
2. Then glue and screw 3/4" tongue and groove plywood on this grid.
3. use 'floor leveler' to make a nice smooth surface
4. finally finish with self-stick vinyl tile (Ive found this beige slate color makes it easy to find little tiny parts, I've even recovered NBW castings I've dropped on the floor.)

The big advantage of this is it's comfortable to stand on for long periods. You can usually clean paint off the tile, but if one gets damaged, it's easy to peel it off (using a hair dryer to heat up the adhesive) and replace it.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7136 Go to Top of Page

Craig H
Fireman

Posted - 09/04/2014 :  9:03:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was wondering the same thing on what to do... or put down on my basement floor?? I don't think I would use any of the above solutions?? as they all sound costly. I think I would just paint mine with a good cement paint and call it done Could always use rug runners or cheap carpet over the floor for some comfort were I would be standing or walking the most.


Country: | Posts: 1402 Go to Top of Page

NVNGRR
Engine Wiper

Premium Member


Posted - 09/04/2014 :  9:57:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit NVNGRR's Homepage  Reply with Quote
A friend of mine used underlayment he found at Home Depot on his cement floor. It was easy to install. So far he is very pleased with it.


Follow this link:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/DRIcore-7-8-in-x-2-ft-x-2-ft-Aspen-Subfloor-Panel-CDGNUS750024024/202268752


Kevin Miller
Winlock, WA

Country: USA | Posts: 359 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 09/04/2014 :  10:06:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Eric, are you building a layout??? As for the floor, there are a lot of great suggestions here. Quite honestly, I think Dave's suggestion is probably the best and sometimes, looking back, I wished I had followed it. However, you are tall like I am so every inch in the basement is important, so adding a subfloor/finished floor solution will loose at least 3" of headroom. If you can afford that, then that's a great solution.

For me, I decided to paint my concrete floor, and now that the layout is nearing completion, I will install runners around aisles.


Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13726 Go to Top of Page

gregnarrowgauge
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/04/2014 :  10:30:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi from Australia, Eric. The suggestions made are all good ones, but almost all of them have some kind of carpet or underlay to soften the blow of walking on concrete. Here in australia its mandatory to have some covering over bare concrete floors, most use some sort of rubberised underlay with a spongy covering on that...in factories it is required to have anti-fatigue matting which is s rubber product with webs in it like little egg cartons to absorb the shock of your ankle bottoming out as your weight applies to the floor. I strongly suggest you get something to cushion the strain, your aching calves and ankles will get to be too much especially if the room is cold. Kind regards Greg. (Ps I have second hand anti fatigue on my plain concrete floor and can do a ten hour day in the train room without any pain in the legs.... Greg.)


Country: Australia | Posts: 194 Go to Top of Page

BigLars
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 09/04/2014 :  10:59:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Craig H

I was wondering the same thing on what to do... or put down on my basement floor?? I don't think I would use any of the above solutions?? as they all sound costly.



If you google carpet tile you can find deals on excess from building projects and buy it for far under $2.00 a sq foot.


My current build:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=50375

Country: USA | Posts: 11209 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 09/04/2014 :  11:44:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Keep in mind Gents, unless your basement is completely humidity proof, carpet get damps and moldy. That can be a problem down the road.
There is a product out that is rubber tiles 12"X12"
square. Very comfortable to walk on. Mold resistant and very cheap. Harbor Freight often has them. You can also just place them where you going to have traffic and not the entire basement.
Just putting in my 3 cents....




Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 5641 Go to Top of Page

SNCF_Fan
Section Hand

Posted - 09/05/2014 :  12:00:21 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Craig H

I was wondering the same thing on what to do... or put down on my basement floor?? I don't think I would use any of the above solutions?? as they all sound costly. I think I would just paint mine with a good cement paint and call it done Could always use rug runners or cheap carpet over the floor for some comfort were I would be standing or walking the most.



There are certainly costs associated with finishing a railroad room, some of which can be quite substantial. The insulfloor I mentioned runs about $1.05 to $1.15 per square foot and Dricore itself runs almost $1.60 per square foot. Industrial or garage carpets can be had for about $0.85-$1.10 per square foot (all local prices). For some this is unnecessary or simply just too expensive. I view it as part of making the railroad room, where I will be spending a lot of time, a comfortable and enjoyable place to be. If my feet and back end up hurting because the flooring is unforgivingly hard and cold, if I get eye strain because the light is too dim, if I feel cold because the basement air is damp, then I’m simply not going to spend the time in the basement that is necessary to accomplish even individual projects, let alone build a complete layout. This is of course a case of “to each their own” and each modeller has to make the personal decision as to how well finished the room must be before building the layout commences and how much of a finished surrounding is necessary to make the layout “fit” into the room.

Thanks and Cheers


Carl

carl.lindon@videotron.ca
Gatineau, Quebec.

Country: Canada | Posts: 50 Go to Top of Page

dlwrailfan1
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 09/05/2014 :  12:36:15 AM  Show Profile  Visit dlwrailfan1's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MarkF

Eric, are you building a layout??? As for the floor, there are a lot of great suggestions here. Quite honestly, I think Dave's suggestion is probably the best and sometimes, looking back, I wished I had followed it. However, you are tall like I am so every inch in the basement is important, so adding a subfloor/finished floor solution will loose at least 3" of headroom. If you can afford that, then that's a great solution.

For me, I decided to paint my concrete floor, and now that the layout is nearing completion, I will install runners around aisles.



Yes, Mark I now have a house with space for a railroad in the basement. I have much experience with concrete and that is not an option for me. I do want something that makes standing for hours possible. Carpet runners help, but I would prefer something with less tripping hazards.

A carpenter friend pointed out that raising the floor is possible if you address how the existing stairs go into the room. You have to keep the stair rise the same -- how to do?

Eric



Country: USA | Posts: 646 Go to Top of Page

dlwrailfan1
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 09/05/2014 :  12:50:40 AM  Show Profile  Visit dlwrailfan1's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks all for the ideas and the links. More research!

Additional feedback:

1. The basement has a sump pump in a well. The house is sixteen years old and shows no signs of water in the basement.
2. It has a radon system that vents air from under the floor.
3. Yes, floor covering will cost money but I think of it as a great investment. Without it, I will not want to spend time down there nor will anyone else.
4. I am not sure how level the floor is but I will take the laser down there and check on that.
5. Ultimately, I want to leave the basement as a great entertainment room, when I eventually sell the house.

Carpet tiles need some more study.

Eric



Country: USA | Posts: 646 Go to Top of Page

acrr46
New Hire

Posted - 09/05/2014 :  10:14:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I went with a commercial quality tile floor in my finished basement. It took over 30 boxes of tile for the entire basement including the workshop and storage area containing the sump pump. Why? Because building a 52'x 20' layout there is always something to clean up, such a saw dust, ground foam, etc. and clean up is simple. Where operators are standing I purchased interlocking rubber mats from Harbor Freight.

Frank



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