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 Barbed Wire making - How-to
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desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 08/07/2013 :  10:33:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This original How-to can be found in the “Detail Parts-How-to” thread here; http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22863&whichpage=10
But I thought I would place it into its own thread for easier access and locating.
There are many ways to make barbed wire, but this is the way I seem to like the best for my projects.

Materials Needed to Scratch Build Barbed Wire
Sharp hobby knife or scissors
Small Clamps
Metal straight edge
Window/door screen material
Fine wire
Paints for weathering

Window/door screen can be purchase at any home improvement or hardware store. It comes in silver and black plastic as well as aluminum. I chose the plastic silver thinking that I wouldn’t need to paint it, but it does look better when weathered/painted.
The fine wire I also got at Home Depot. It is the size of magnet type wire.
Building the Barbed Wire:
First cutting a Strand of Barbs: Lay the edge of the screen material out on a flat surface and take your straight edge and lay it so that it is parallel to the lateral fibers in the screen. You are going to cut with your hobby knife, razor or scissors, between two parallel fibers leaving some spiky bits attached. Follow pictures below.
Twisting the Barbed Wire: Measure a length of metal wire as long as the barbed fiber section.
Preparing to Twist the Barbed Wire: Wire and fiber are held securely by two small clamps at both ends.
Once the fiber and the wire are joined and attached into the ends of the clamps slowly spin the two strands while working your fingers twisting both clamps in opposite directions to twist the fibers together. This will twist the plastic fiber around the metal one. The one picture shows the strands through a magnifying glass. You will then see your barbed wire come to life.
If using it on a farm scene just run the strands from post to post.
If using it as concertina wire for a secured area, or military scene. Twist it around a small dowel.






















Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
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EM-1
Engine Wiper



Posted - 08/07/2013 :  11:34:38 AM  Show Profile  Visit EM-1's Homepage  Send EM-1 a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Well one things for sure, you wouldn't need a large section of the screen to make this!!!! A little would go a long ways!


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desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 08/07/2013 :  11:59:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by EM-1

Well one things for sure, you wouldn't need a large section of the screen to make this!!!! A little would go a long ways!


For sure! It's quite fast and easy to make up as well. And turns into a pretty neat looking barbed wire. I had found the idea in a military modelers terrain modeling book some years back and thought it was a keeper for model railroading.
I never did it, but I'm sure it would make up into a great looking flatcar load. It would be a lot of coils though to make up.



Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
Post count: 5000 posts added to below count.

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EM-1
Engine Wiper



Posted - 08/07/2013 :  12:47:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit EM-1's Homepage  Send EM-1 a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by desertdrover

quote:
Originally posted by EM-1

Well one things for sure, you wouldn't need a large section of the screen to make this!!!! A little would go a long ways!


For sure! It's quite fast and easy to make up as well. And turns into a pretty neat looking barbed wire. I had found the idea in a military modelers terrain modeling book some years back and thought it was a keeper for model railroading.
I never did it, but I'm sure it would make up into a great looking flatcar load. It would be a lot of coils though to make up.



Someone other then my wife, has finally seen through me! You mention "car load" to me and in a short amount of time, you'll eventually see the same load...... Not a bad idea all rolled up tonto a spool of some sort.....

Speaking of, those TYCO 40 ft flat cars that had dozers on them, I've loaded one or 2 with coiled wire........This is a whole other meaning!



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Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 08/07/2013 :  3:25:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Slick little SBS, Louis! Thanks for sharing this!

Now, where do I need concertina wire? Hmmmmm....

Pete
in Michigan



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CN6401
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/07/2013 :  7:40:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit CN6401's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Great little how to Louis, but I have to point out, if you get the aluminum screen, the crossing strands are note attached to the perpendicular stands.
The alumininum screen or mesh, what ever you want to call it is woven like cloth.
I have been using the aluminum screen for some of my landscape forming instead of cardboard web. When you cut it you have to be careful it doesn't fray like cloth does.
Ralph



Edited by - CN6401 on 08/07/2013 7:42:18 PM

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closetguy
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/07/2013 :  8:05:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit closetguy's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Yo! Louis!
Another ingenious use for something completely from left field. What an imagination
Mike M



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Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/07/2013 :  8:18:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice Louis!


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desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 08/07/2013 :  9:01:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Orionvp17

Slick little SBS, Louis! Thanks for sharing this!

Now, where do I need concertina wire? Hmmmmm....

Pete
in Michigan


quote:
Originally posted by CN6401

Great little how to Louis, but I have to point out, if you get the aluminum screen, the crossing strands are note attached to the perpendicular stands.
The alumininum screen or mesh, what ever you want to call it is woven like cloth.
I have been using the aluminum screen for some of my landscape forming instead of cardboard web. When you cut it you have to be careful it doesn't fray like cloth does.
Ralph



quote:
Originally posted by closetguy

Yo! Louis!
Another ingenious use for something completely from left field. What an imagination
Mike M


quote:
Originally posted by Tyson Rayles

Very nice Louis!


Thanks Pete!

Ralph, thanks for your comments!

Thanks Mike & Mike for replying and posting a comment.



Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
Post count: 5000 posts added to below count.

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fockewulf37
Crew Chief

Posted - 08/07/2013 :  9:06:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit fockewulf37's Homepage  Send fockewulf37 an AOL message  Reply with Quote
This can be done in G scale also. You can Get the Natural Air Cut to Fit air filters and the backing is a mesh that is the right spacing for G scale.
You do have to pull it off and paint it a rust color. It worked well for me...

Ty















Edited by - fockewulf37 on 08/07/2013 9:08:05 PM

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desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 08/07/2013 :  9:19:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by fockewulf37

This can be done in G scale also. You can Get the Natural Air Cut to Fit air filters and the backing is a mesh that is the right spacing for G scale.
You do have to pull it off and paint it a rust color. It worked well for me...

Ty



Thanks for posting your version Ty. That is a great option for the G Scale modelers. Your scene there looks great!



Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
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BigLars
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 08/07/2013 :  10:25:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great how to.

My current build:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=50375

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wesleybeks
Fireman



Posted - 08/08/2013 :  05:13:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for posting. Some nice results.


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MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 08/08/2013 :  10:15:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great idea Louis! And it looks great. That's one I'm going to file away for future reference.

Mark

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jatravia
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/08/2013 :  11:45:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Another keeper! What neat idea.

Thanks!

Joe <><



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desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 08/08/2013 :  2:38:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Many Thanks Larry, Wes, Mark & Joe!


Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
Post count: 5000 posts added to below count.

Country: USA | Posts: 15000 Go to Top of Page
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