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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/15/2013 :  1:47:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is a HO scale scratch build using plans from Pat Harriman's book "Early Wood Frame and Stone Structures". This is a build of the second plan in the book, Colin's Cabin.
-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7214

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/15/2013 :  1:50:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Additional Sandbox Build Threads:
Small Miner's Cabin: (HO Scale)
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=40225&whichpage=1
-- Base hues for wood coloring.
-- Carving Plaster Castings.
-- Coloring Plaster Castings for Colorado Clear Creek area.
-- Mortar line coloring in plaster cast stone walls.
-- Faded/worn paint on individual boards.

Lucas's Cabin: (HO Scale)
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=40591
-- Clapboard siding how-to.
-- Quick and effective clapboard coloring technique.
-- Obtaining grey-blue 'haze' on corrugated roofing.
-- 'Defines' of brush staining and wood graining techniques.

Seth's Cabin (HO Scale)
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=41286
-- Board and batten siding how to.
-- Coloring stripwood with Prismacolor markers including evaluation.
-- Using Sandable Hard Gesso to represent concrete texture in HO scale.
-- Testing of colored graphite pencils to color rolled paper roofing paper stock edges.

INTRO AND THREAD GOALS:
I want to try using some construction and weathering techniques which are new, at least to myself, or which I want to modify to fit my modeling style. I feel that prior to continuing on to some craftsman kits and continuing a major project, I want to increase my wood weathering skills and stone carving/coloring techniques. Building some structures from Pat's plans will provide the opportunity to expand my skill sets and test different techniques.

As I'm using the build to test/play with techniques, I will not be constructing the structure as suggested in Harriman's book.

I will attempt to show/describe:
-- The effect or technique which I want to achieve or try out.
-- How I approached the effect/technique(s), what tools I used and in what order so that others may be able to reproduce the effect(s) should one wish to capture the effect or try out the technique.
-- The results of the various attempts, and what I think I may want to consider for the future.

My overall goal is to create a notebook for future reference. I hope the notebook will also contain your thoughts and suggestions as that will only add perspective to the notes.

I will not be building the structure to my usual standards as these builds will be in the sandbox. As such, I'll be building the models only to layout or front of layout quality. I probably will not keep any of the models, but will donate the completed structures or mini-dioramas to a few local clubs.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 02/27/2014 10:21:54 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7214 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/15/2013 :  2:45:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Build Goals:
1) Base Weathering:
--Attempt to recreate in HO scale the raw, old wood colors as seen in Sierra West Scale Models Tool Shed by Kevin O.
Reference: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=26900&whichpage=18 (Also see a few of the following pages for additional information.)
2) Try a mortar line product to add texture to wood to simulate concrete.
3) Stone carving and coloring:
-- Use hydrocal or Plaster of Paris (POP) to create a stone chimney/foundation and color the castings to fit into Colorado rocky mountain hues as found in the Clear Creek area.
-- Identify possible ways to easily create/carve crumbling of a plaster foundation.
4) Use of laser cut window product in scratch building. Study in coloring and weathering.


Basic Construction:
-- HO scale board-by-board over a mat board template. (Matboard: Cresent Mfg.# 948. Two sides colored; beige/white)
-- Attached roof will be shingled.
-- One window in the structure will be a laser cut product.
-- Scratch built door
-- Plaster foundation and chimney.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 07/15/2013 3:27:13 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7214 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/15/2013 :  4:06:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris,

This looks like another nice build to try to techniques.

Your Construction Goals are a great idea.


Bruce

Country: USA | Posts: 31813 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 07/15/2013 :  4:59:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris,I see your at it again here too.
I think it was you,that informed me about these Pat Harriman books.
I purchased both books,and was very pleased with the many inspirational structures & ideas in both of them.
Best of luck with this one,I'll be watching you score your goals no problems.

Greg



Country: Canada | Posts: 8501 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/15/2013 :  5:08:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As some of the older members of the forum may remember, I have been trying to work out a good system of creating the coloring in HO and O scales for the siding shown in the photo below.

This has come up in a couple of my build threads, and many great modelers have taken on the task to assist with coming up with methods to reproduce the colors. This has resulted in a couple of build threads containing some really excellent discussions with examples of weathering and how-to's to obtain the hues.

One of the problems has always been the 'sheen' seen on the prototype. This has always totally stumped me and my attempts.

Here is the issue. A lot of the cheap structures built in the Colorado hills used a cheap pine which contains a high content of sap. The sap comes out of the cut wood and produces the yellow-orange and dark orange-black hues. In addition, there is a 'sheen' often associated to the coloring. This weathering/coloring occurs fairly quickly (appx. 4-5 years is what I'm told) so it may be a somewhat common coloring associated to siding used on a lot of structures in the Colorado narrow gauge areas. Thus, my desire to identify an easy method to capture the coloring of the prototype.

Discovering a technique has been elusive for my style of modeling. Instead of trying to capture the entire feel of the prototype, I'm going to focus only on the various hues. Kevin's technique holds some promise if I can modify it slightly and make it fit into HO scale. I'm not going to worry about the 'sheen' of the prototype on this build, but mainly focus on obtaining colors easily.

Also, note all of the 'yellow' knots within the siding boards. Need to look at how to simulate this hue also, with it's dark outer 'ring'.



-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 07/15/2013 5:36:30 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7214 Go to Top of Page

stickframe
Engine Wiper

Posted - 07/15/2013 :  8:40:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm looking forward to this - the colors shown above are so distinct - not grey/brown etc - the umbe to goldenrod(?) and almost black(!), plus knots! - and matching the look at "scale"; maybe I'm not using the right words - but being able to see the building (and colors) on a layout and still look "right" - maybe the "sheen" you're refering to, but i know what you mean - you can see this in real life...will the wood be basswood? or might you try something else? - maybe a base material with more/different color than the bassswood?

sorry to go on and on - this looks interesting, and I'll follow along -

NIck



Country: USA | Posts: 205 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/26/2013 :  1:56:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, after about 1/3 of a Kappler Gallon Craft Pack ( http://www.kapplerusa.com/y2k/p-misc.htm ) and couple packages of strip wood, I'm still looking to find a method of producing the colors shown in the earlier prototype photo. I did however, succeed in making a dent in my strip wood supply, so Eric at Kappler will be hearing from me soon.

So... let's return to this build...
One of the goals was to create a rustic brown color siding. I'll end this entry with a couple of photo's with the coloring I achieved.

Tools & Technique: Templates
1) Cut one long strip of mat board 56 scale foot long by 16 scale foot wide.
2) Cut long strip into two strips. 32 foot long and 24 foot long.
3) Square cut edges with True Sander.
4) Cut the 32 foot long strip into two 8 foot wide strips.
5) Square cut edges on True Sander.
6) Cut 6 inches off the two end pieces.
7) Cut the 24 foot long (short piece) into two 12 foot long pieces.
8) Mark the end walls with a line at 8 foot height. Use the side walls as a template to obtain the correct 8' height. This will insure that all walls are the same height.
9) Note on both sides the "top" and "Bottom" sections of the walls.
10) Cut one (or both) of the 32 foot by 8 foot walls in half. This will produce the two 16 foot by 8 foot walls for the structure sides. Note that there is also one (or two if cut earlier) practice walls.
11) Square all sides of walls with True Sander.
12) Measure and cut door and window openings.
13) Color all edges, openings and both sides of the mat-board with Prismacolor French Grey 90%, PM-163.

Tools & Technique: Siding - Adding Wood Grain and Knot Holes
Material: Kappler 12 inch lengths scale strip wood:
A) 2x8 (9)
B) 2x6 (2)
C) 3x7 (1)

1) Grain both sides strip wood with file card brush.
2) Grain both sides strip wood with steel wire brush.
3) Add knot holes at random using a #64 wire bit in pin vice. I drilled a total of 30 holes.
4) Sand with green sanding pad.

Tools & Technique: Siding - Base Weathering and Coloring
Material: Soft Pastels:
A) Schmincke Burnt Sienna #17-018-068-B
B) Rembrandt Raw Umber # 408-3
C) Schmincke Flesh Ochre #17--016-023-H
D) Rembrandt Yellow Ochre #227.3

NOTE: Towards end of build dry-brush siding with Builder-in-Scale Yellow Wood or Brown Wood stain. ( http://www.builders-in-scale.com/bis/parts-weather.html )

Apply to both sides of strip wood:
1) Scrape chalk powder onto strip wood using a straight edge razor blade. Scrape a med layer of raw umber and flesh ochre (approx. 40%-60% powder mix) and set with clear ETOH (ETOH = Rubbing Alcohol) applied with a Loew-Cornell Frabic Dye #6 brush.
2) Scrape light dusting of flesh and yellow ochre onto wood.
3) While wood still damp, apply heavy wash of Silverwood applied with fabric brush.
4) Brush with stiff wire brush.
5) Wipe wood with ETOH soaked paper towel.
6) Random stipple with Silverwood wash and then blend using fabric brush.
7) Cut all siding to length, allowing extra for trimming once applied to sub-walls.
8) Wire brush all cut board ends.
9) Lightly stain cut ends with Silverwood using a cheap #3 soft round brush. Stain ends in small bundles (approx. 4-6 boards).

Tools & Technique: Apply Siding to long walls
1) Apply siding using yellow carpenter's glue.
2) Board over window and door openings.
3) Trim siding excess from top of walls using #18 blade in a #5 handle. Use sub-wall as cutting guide and trim via 'punch' type of cuts.
4) Cut out door sides with #18 blade.
Cut out door header and window using #17 blade.
5) Square/smooth cuts and edges of mat-board with emery board (nail file) and square needle file.
6) Stain all cut edges with light solution of A-I (light A-I = 1 tsp/pint non-waterproof black India ink in one pint rubbing alcohol.) using small brush #2 round brush. Apply wash using brush hairs by ferrule to control volume of wash applied. (Use brush hairs between lines in drawing below.)



Tools & Technique: Apply Siding to end walls
1) Cut siding to scale 8 foot lengths.
2) Wire brush all ends of siding.
3) Mark sub-walls with lines for split/short boards. The lines will become cut and glue guides.
4) Apply siding using stop across bottom of wall to create even board height on wall.
5) Stain top ends of siding with Silverwood wash. Use a #1 liner soft hair brush to color the board ends.
6) Color with Silverwood all ends of scrap cut from long side walls.
7) Add siding to upper end sections of wall ends using scraps from long walls..
8) Trim excess siding from upper section of end walls using the sub-wall mat-board as a cutting guide.
9) Use emery board to sand smooth the board edges to the mat-board sub-wall.
10) Color all wall edges with Silverwood wash using a cheap soft haired mop brush.







-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 07/26/2013 2:01:30 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7214 Go to Top of Page

dallas_m
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/26/2013 :  2:38:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You may need to add some blues and purples to the mix to get the desired browns and oranges ... I think??

Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!

Edited by - dallas_m on 07/26/2013 2:39:37 PM

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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/26/2013 :  2:49:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Dallas, and you are correct. I decided to bag my pursuit of the prototype and focus instead on the background colors of the siding for this build. Thus, the goal of getting a rustic brown-red hues like in Kevin's referenced build.

As you know from my 'pink' water tank, I tend to layer my colors working from those subtle base hues.

Practice... Practice... Practice.... Someday I'll snag those dark blue-blacks and their sheen, accented by streams and dots of yellow sitting on top of the rustic brown-red hued base.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 07/26/2013 2:51:30 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7214 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/29/2013 :  10:37:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As many of you know, I tend to spend some weekends each year kicking around some of the old towns in the Colorado area to gather pictures for the winter time modeling season.

Two weekends ago I was in Salida at the Ohio-Colorado Smelting and Refining Company where the 365 foot tall stack made with individual bricks is still standing. I got a lot of pictures of great brick work, but those reference pictures have little to do with this thread.

This past weekend I was in Leadville poking around the old Scandinavian enclave area around west 1st, 2nd and 3rd streets, in the 300 to 700 blocks. A few pictures from that area of town of a couple of structures for weathering ideas and color reference.

By the way, I loved the 'extension' ladder against the brick structure so much I just had to share it with you. Careful study of the pictures will show a lot of old colors on the doors and trim. And that short brick fireplace with it's 'platform' will for sure show up on one of my models prior to the end of this year.

Anyway, I hope that you can see from the 2nd, 3rd and last pictures why I colored the this structure the way I have. And should anyone want higher resolution pictures to work from, shoot me a PM. I had to remove around 50% of the resolution to make the file sizes small enough for posting.














-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 07/29/2013 10:46:13 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7214 Go to Top of Page

mabloodhound
Fireman



Posted - 07/29/2013 :  12:09:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
KP,
Is that last photo from Leadville, Colo? It would be an interesting structure to build. Do you have any more of the building fronts?

I like your research on getting those burnt brown tones.



Country: USA | Posts: 6700 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/29/2013 :  12:22:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thought that I'd take a moment and share with those who are interested how I use the pictures which I take for my modeling. I apply the same 'general review process' of both model and prototype pictures which I look at here on the forum.

In general, when I take a picture of the 'real deal', I always try to include in the picture:
1) Some actual soil color, or at least something showing the ground around the structure.
2) An angle shot to enhance shadows.
3) Some reference background colors.
4) Some specific reasons (at least 3) for the reference shot.

When I get home, I have time to further study the pictures and often glen additional information.

Looking at the 3rd picture above, the reason I composed (ideas I had in mind at the time) the photo was to show:
1) The extension ladder, and how the top was fit into the top of the ladder, and the wide spacing of rungs. Additionally, the grey was interesting in that it closely reminded me of a 'gull grey' color which got painted on wood.
2) The used brick which makes up the structure. (How does one carve and color used brick anyway??)
3) Note the brickwork around the 4 pane window and how deep the window is set into the wall.
4) A real big focus for this shot was the corner of the foreground structure with it's very dark blues (almost black) color contrast to the the brown-red hued wood siding in the background. I also noted the sage green of the fascia board on the foreground structure and composed the shot with the green tree to assist in referencing the color hues.
5) The height of the short brick chimney and it's platform.
5) The size of the top wood beam going across the top of the brick structure.

Upon looking at the picture now I have also noted:
1) The various tree types in the background.
2) The leaning telephone pole.
3) The secondary wood header in the brick structure doorway.
4) The looped wire (probably barbed) hanging on the left side of the chimney platform.
5) The metal sheet bent down the front of the chimney platform. The metal sheet probably extends under the chimney. Note how the coloring changes from the orange-red brick color to the violet-black hue in the center along with the changes in surface texture.
6) The ends of the boards forming the roof under the corrugated metal roof (I have pictures of the roof which is held down by rocks). This gives a idea of size of the wood used.
7)The number of brick courses above the roof line providing an idea of chimney height.
8) The hinges and lock on the door of the wood structure connected to the brick structure.
9) The hole above the door appears to be cut almost like a bird entry. (Reason for such a opening?)
10) Height of grasses at base of structure.
11) Tar paper roofing is tacked down over the edge of the black structure.
12) Only one side (left jamb) of the 4 pane widow is worn down to the wood, with pant still good on the muntins.
13) The really crooked top rung of the 'extension' ladder.
14) The strong brown-red hues on the bottom edge of the clapboard siding on the foreground structure.
15) The general hues of color on the siding of the yellow-brown structure.
16) The size of the header above the door in the wood structure connected to the brick structure.
17) Note the 'brown and black' knot holes of the siding. Often they are yellow on siding at this overall coloring state, at least here in Colorado. Looking at the wood structure connected to the bricks here.
18) The large foundation beam on which the black structure sits.
19) Shape of brick chimney just above the black structure in the far background.

The above is how I use 'reference' the photos. I use all of the photos I take in much the same way. I hope this will help others in using 'reference' photos when they look at the many wonderful photos available to each modeler.

The brick structure roof:


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7214 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/29/2013 :  12:49:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave,
Yes, the last photo of the false-front bar, stone and brick structures next to it are in Leadville. The photo was taken about 7-10 blocks from where the other photos were shot two days ago. What I really liked was the different fronts of the two structures and all of the details associated to the buildings.

I do have photos of other building fronts, a lot of which I have shared here on the forum. I often go into the mountains and then decide the 'theme' for the day. I then tend to group my photos around that 'theme'.

This past weekend in Leadville was mostly about weathering colors and the influence of Scandinavian folk in the structures. Even though I was at both of the railroad stations in Leadville, I did not bother taking any pictures of the stations as they were not in 'theme'.

In Salida two weekends ago I was interested in brickwork, so I have shots like the following to garner ideas from.

If you have something specific you are interested in, I'll be making at least two more trips into the mountains in the next few weeks. Let me know what it is that you would like to see and I'll see what I can come up with.



-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 07/29/2013 12:58:28 PM

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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/31/2013 :  3:51:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tools & Technique: Siding Details
1) Add individual nail holes with straight pin held in hemostats.
Note: Want to see effect on nail holes when brown or yellow wood wash is applied.

Tools & Technique: Brace Walls
Material: Kappler 8x8 scale strip wood:
1) Cut 8x8 wood to fit walls and corners. Allow for 8x8 at corner joint for wall overlap (side walls over end walls.
2) Color all brace pieces with PM-163
3) Glue into place.

Tools & Technique: Window and Door Framing, Door Construction and Coloring of Corner Trim, Fascia, Porch Rafters
Material: Kappler 12 inch lengths scale strip wood:
A) 1x4 (1)
B) 1x6 (2)
C) 2x6 (2)
D) 1x8 (1)

1) Pre-stain 1x6 with Brett's Brew (Sierra West Scale Models) or Silverwood.
2) Grain all wood with stiff steel wire brush.
3) Add knot holes to 2x6 with #64 wire bit. Total of five knot holes over the total wood length were created.
4) Sand with green scrub pad.
5) Color using same colors and sequence as siding.

Frame Window:
1) Create sill at bottom of window using 1x8. Install with 1x8 flush with backside of wall producing a scale 2 inch extension past the wall face.
2) Use 1x6 to frame the balance of the opening making sure that the framing is flush with the wall face.
3) Use Lase-Art 4 pane window sanded to fit window opening. Use emery board to sand as needed.

Color window casting
A) Color window face by scraping a small pile of the colors pastels which were used to color the wall.
B) Use a #1 soft round and Silverwood to make a few drops of 'paint'. Color the window casting with the pastel solution.
Add glass
C) Cut clear PVC .005 inch for glass to fit window.
--NOTE: My PVC sheet had been dusted with a light spray of Dullcoat. I also added cracked glass in one of the window panes.
D)Attach glass using the adhesive backing on widow.

Install Window
F) Glue completed window into wall opening. Aleen's Fast Grab Tacky Glue was used.

Frame Window Opening
G) Add outside window framing to wall face using 1x4 and Aleen's Fast Grab Tacky Glue.

Tools & Technique: Door Construction and Framing
Material: Colored Kappler strip wood:
A) 1x4
B) 1x6

NOTE: Use two-sided tape to hold door strip wood in position until frame is completed.
1) Line door opening with colored 1x6. Make sure edges are flush with wall face.
2) Form door over two-sided tape using 1x4's.
3) Add Z-frame bracing to door face using 1x6.
4) Add nail holes to Z-brace with straight pin held in hemostats.
5) Color all door edges with Silverwood using hairs near brush ferrule.
6) With door face down on paper towel, flood backside with Silverwood.

General Construction Notes: Glue Sides Together
1) Glue one end and one side together creating an "L".
2) Glue the other side and end walls together creating a second "L".
3) Glue the two sub-assemblies together.
4) Add corner trim using 1x6 or 1x8. Trim corner trim to fit roof angles as trim is added.
5) Sand walls to fit roof angles.

Glue door into place
6) Frame door opening with 1x4.
7) Glue door into place.
8) Touch-up all sanded and cut surfaces with Silverwood, light A-I or soft pastels as required.







-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7214 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/31/2013 :  6:06:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The cabin is coming along nicely, Kris.

Over the 8 years that our two sons were at the Air Force Academy, we visited Leadville a few times. Of course, that was before I was back into modeling, so I did not take any pictures with a modeler's eye - and, it was before digital photography. That actually seems like a good reason for us to head back there.




Bruce

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