Railroad Line Forums - Subroadbed, Roadbed and Track
Railroad Line Forums
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Sponsors   Support the RRLine   Guestbook   FAQ     Register
Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Live Chat | Avatar Legend | Search | Statistics
Photo Album | File Lister | File Library
[ Active Members: 5 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 86 ]  [ Total: 91 ]  [ Newest Member: Dizzy ]
 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Model Railroad Construction
 Subroadbed, Roadbed and Track
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Author Previous Topic: Ballast Topic Next Topic: looking for switch machine
Page: of 12

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/27/2013 :  11:13:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Simple under-the-baseboard mount for Humpyard Purveyance turnout control levers:



Note that the lever is facing the wrong way in this picture.

I cut the shape from a scrap of 3/4" birch plywood using a bandsaw, but a handsaw or sabre saw would also work. The main part is 2 1/4" deep, the mounting ears are 1" deep. I marked hole locations using Humpyard's template and drilled them with my drill press. I could have cut off the unused actuating arms, but I prefer to leave them intact, fantasizing that I may live long enough to complete this layout, scrap it and re-use them. So I sanded a pocket with the front roller of my hand belt sander.



To mount it, I drilled a 1/8" hole through each ear for 1 5/8" drywall screws. It's set 1 3/4" back from the edge of the baseboard.

Having the wood support behind the levers is important for distant turnouts: Long or sharply curved runs of the Humpyard push/pull rods tend to lose motion to flexing of the plastic tube. I slip a length of 1/8" aluminum tube over the plastic, push it through the wood mount and flare it with a punch to hold it in place.



Country: USA | Posts: 5977 Go to Top of Page

AVRR-PA
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/28/2013 :  06:48:37 AM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Nicely done.

Don



Country: USA | Posts: 5005 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/03/2013 :  8:50:53 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Someone asked in another thread about how to use slide switches for frog power and point locking. I use mine with heel-thrown points, but parts of it should be usable with conventional throwbars.



Here I've made the points, drilled 1/8" holes for the point tubes, cut the 3/32" point rods and drawn where the points should be positioned on the rods to line up with the closure rails. This step could be avoided by carefully locating a smaller pilot hole before changing to the 1/8" bit.



Here a point has been silver-soldered to the rod, and the rod threaded 3-48. The block is lexan, drilled #50 and tapped 2-56 for the locking screws. I use .025 music wire for the two throws (one shown).



The loops of wire connecting the closure and stock rails visible in the first picture are also soldered to the point tubes.



The throw wires are clamped to the point rods with 3-48 nuts.



This slide switch's bracket is 1" aluminum angle. Smaller switches can use the next smaller size of angle. Mounting holes are #50, tapped 2-56. I was in a hurry when I bought this switch, paid later when I had to stunt-solder a wire to the contact I needed :(



The screws are cut off flush to clear the rod. The slider is drilled #53 and tapped 1-72. I thread the 1/16" brass rod with a 1-72 die.



Here the mechanism is far enough along to throw and lock the points.



And here I've wired the slide switch to the points & frog, and connected the Humpyard Purveyance throw wire.

Why do I bother with all this? The point rods can be whatever length is necessary. The mechanism can go on either side of the rods, up to about 30 degrees off the center line of the track. You can use it with push/pull rods, solenoids, twin coil machines or stall-motor drives. You do have to be able to get at both the mechanism and the points simultaneously to get it adjusted, but once it's right, it stays right for a long time.

[long after I posted this, I noticed a typo]



Edited by - jbvb on 05/21/2014 1:36:21 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 5977 Go to Top of Page

AVRR-PA
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/04/2013 :  08:03:42 AM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Very nicely done!

Don



Country: USA | Posts: 5005 Go to Top of Page

herronpeter
Engine Wiper

Posted - 05/23/2014 :  8:03:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This short video shows how simple a frog polarity switch can be when used in conjunction with HO Caboose Hobbies high switch-stands in O scale. Am just starting out w video so please pardon the quality but I think it gets the point across. Simple and it works.

Thanks,

Peter

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zF3cW_MHFg



Country: USA | Posts: 155 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 09/28/2015 :  09:18:56 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Careless handling had pulled the alignment tubes off this connector on the wye to the Hub Div. internal staging yard. The copper plate went with them and dismantling the scenery/backboard to build a new pair in place was too much like work. So I made a replacement:



I had some Radio Shack double-sided PCB on hand.



I tinned the bottom of the code 100 rail and tacked it in place by sweat soldering with my 100W gun.



Then I reinforced the joints with more solder. The alignment tubes are 3/32" brass with 1/16" brass pins.

Here I still need to file off the copper down the middle to isolate the rails. Then a bit of black paint and it will be done (till the next 'careless handling' incident).



Country: USA | Posts: 5977 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 09/29/2015 :  07:23:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Impressive work and nice fix of the mishap.


Country: USA | Posts: 2696 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/03/2015 :  11:35:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's a question for everyone.

One of our local guys is going to be rebuilding his layout. In doing some research, he came across this layout build at the MRH blog site where a guy uses plywood and sheetrock as a sub-roadbed whereas most of us use plywood and homasoate! Here is a link to the page that shows pictures of his layout using sheetrock, but I couldn't find any reference as to why he uses it.

http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/3932?page=6

So I'm wondering if anyone here has used sheetrock, or drywall, as their subroaded bed material. If so, why and how is it working out?


Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13728 Go to Top of Page

nhguy
Fireman



Posted - 11/04/2015 :  03:08:07 AM  Show Profile  Visit nhguy's Homepage  Send nhguy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I have a friend who has part of his layout built on sheet rock. So far it is working out fine. He uses cork for mainlines and track directly on the Sheetrock itself. It is fairly strong for holding track and scenery when supported from below. When I asked him why he used it he told me it was cheap and available at the time. Unlike Homasote, unless it it milled, it is smooth. I have to agree there. Is it noisy? Not as noisy as you would think. It is about the same as plywood. It is easier to make modifications with a knife than it is to modify plywood with a saw. You can also peel back the paper backer and expose the plaster to adhere scenery plaster to. Other than not being able to take a person standing on it like plywood it seems he made a good choice. Bill

Bill Shanaman
New Haven RR
Hartford Division
in Colorado.

Country: USA | Posts: 4763 Go to Top of Page

LynnB
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/04/2015 :  04:49:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think it would be fine if your glueing to it but would be leary about track nailing and screwing into it.


Country: Canada | Posts: 2365 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/04/2015 :  07:48:53 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Also, I've seen drywall sag in unconditioned (but never exposed to actual rain) spaces. This might work in the builder's favor when trying to make a vertical curve, but I'd use plywood for those and leave the drywall planar wherever possible.


Country: USA | Posts: 5977 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/04/2015 :  09:18:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
After reading through that blog a little further, I found a post by Joe Fugate who also endorsed the use of drywall! Joe wrote:

"We're talking large flat areas, where the traditional hobby press has advocated homasote over plywood.

The drywall replaces the homasote, and it's still backed by plywood.

When I first had this idea, I spoke to an architect who was also a model railroader and he agreed that drywall is more dimensionally stable than homasote, and less suseptible to moisture than homasote - and it's certainly way cheaper than homasote. It also holds spikes just as good (if not a little better) than homasote.

Long story short, I have no use for homasote. It's overpriced and over-rated as far as I'm concerned. I've used plaster drywall in the yard and town areas on my layout (now 19 years old) and I have no complaints."

I've always used homasote but after reading on this, I would now consider drywall as a substitute! My only concern would be the noise factor but I can't think of any other negatives off hand.


Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13728 Go to Top of Page

sjconrail
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/04/2015 :  12:24:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Interesting find Mark. I would also think drywall won't flex with humidity as much as homasote also, thereby eliminating another potential source of kinks in trackwork,

Phil



Country: USA | Posts: 300 Go to Top of Page

nhguy
Fireman



Posted - 11/04/2015 :  12:38:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit nhguy's Homepage  Send nhguy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
You can spike or nail track to drywall. But only once in the same spot.

Bill Shanaman
New Haven RR
Hartford Division
in Colorado.

Country: USA | Posts: 4763 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/04/2015 :  6:54:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sjconrail

Interesting find Mark. I would also think drywall won't flex with humidity as much as homasote also, thereby eliminating another potential source of kinks in trackwork,

Phil



Phil, it was Bob who came across this and is pondering going this route. The more I think about it, the more I like it. To your point, I have to believe it almost eliminates the expansion/contraction issue we all have to deal with.

And Bill, supposedly it holds spikes as well if not better than homasote!


Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13728 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 12 Previous Topic: Ballast Topic Next Topic: looking for switch machine  
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Previous Page | Next Page
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-19 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.59 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000