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[ Active Members: 3 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 110 ]  [ Total: 113 ]  [ Newest Member: Mark DeSchane ]
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Author Previous Topic: Ballast Topic Next Topic: looking for switch machine
Page: of 12

Geezer
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/19/2009 :  2:12:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just my opinion, but "neolube" is a conductor. I have used this
product before, and it will conduct electricity. But all in all,
if you are going to run locomotives on the rail, the pencil lead
idea sounds great to me. You might also try some "Blacken It"....
a chemical solution that will blacken brass & copper. JMO.....


"You can find my Website & Threads here:"
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=47229

Country: USA | Posts: 12973 Go to Top of Page

AVRR-PA
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/24/2009 :  2:04:26 PM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Model Railroader's "How to Build Realistic Reliable Track" special issue has an article on "Quiet Roadbed." The author (Bob Kingsnorth) tested a lot of different combinations and got the best results with cork on top of camper tape and almost equally good results from Homabed on top of camper tape. He bedded everything in latex adhesive caulk.

Good article, IMHO.

Don



Country: USA | Posts: 5005 Go to Top of Page

kewlbrew
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/21/2009 :  2:19:55 PM  Show Profile  Visit kewlbrew's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Question on vertical easements - How have you ensured that your grade transitions are smooth and gentle enough to prevent operational headaches?

I'm most interested in 3 to 5 percent grades common to many narrow gauge environments.

Thanks

-John



Country: USA | Posts: 528 Go to Top of Page

emccamey
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/21/2009 :  3:07:53 PM  Show Profile  Visit emccamey's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by kewlbrew

Question on vertical easements - How have you ensured that your grade transitions are smooth and gentle enough to prevent operational headaches?

I'm most interested in 3 to 5 percent grades common to many narrow gauge environments.

Thanks -John



John,

Use a minimum of 3/4" subroadbed. Bending it into incline will keep the transition from being too sharp. Note: the length of the transition will be much longer than your expect. The effective grade that results may require much more run length than would be otherwise expected.

-ed-




Country: USA | Posts: 964 Go to Top of Page

kewlbrew
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/21/2009 :  3:42:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit kewlbrew's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I'm working in a modular context. Putting spring tension into the mix by flexing a subroadbed seems bad to me. What I'm looking for is some means of determining transition length and maximum rate of grade. The transition lengths will have a significant impact on module size I would think.

-John



Country: USA | Posts: 528 Go to Top of Page

emccamey
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/21/2009 :  7:09:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit emccamey's Homepage  Reply with Quote
John,

OK, the transitions of the vertical curve will still cause lengthening unless you create a kink or have less grade. Generally a VERY large vertical radius will suffice.

Larry Blanchard has some nice actual trial tested and theoretical data and illustrations for HO at: http://www.intergate.com/~lard/model_rail/vcurves.htm Note: he has tables using 8, 10, and 12 foot radius transitions.

For an engineering review of vertical curves see: http://www.tpub.com/inteng/11h.htm

The math applicable for model railroad variables are being studied by a special sub-committee in the NMRA Standards and Conformance department. "Ronald S. Reagan" <rrron@i-55.com> is developing the current working drafts (caution: math intensive).

NMRA data sheet D1j (updated November 1993) covers grades and shows the relationships and impacts of the vertical curves. NMRA data sheets are avialable (by special order) to NMRA members.

Simply put - you have to count on transitions. What you need is dependent on the scale, the equipment, and the space allowances. I don't know of specific testing or study expressly for small narrow gauge circumstances - likely less a problem than you may be concerned with. Try some combination with your equipment.

-ed-



Country: USA | Posts: 964 Go to Top of Page

kewlbrew
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/22/2009 :  04:20:33 AM  Show Profile  Visit kewlbrew's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Ed -

Thanks for the info. I read through the two links. I had seen Larry's info before. My challenge with his info is how that translates into creating a transition. I can't imagine laying out 8 and 12 foot radius templates for a 5 to 10 inch transition curve (never mind dealing with parabolic arcs).

I'm all for keeping things simple and easy to implement. Theory and tables of numbers is all well and good. However, it's got to boil down to a simple procedure so you can put it into practice. Otherwise, the analytic effort is wasted.

-John




Country: USA | Posts: 528 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/22/2009 :  07:59:23 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
If I wanted to be sure of my vertical curves without either torquing the subroadbed or laying out a huge circular template, I'd make a go/no go gauge: Get a rigid piece of wood (1x4?) 12 - 16" long. Using a strip of something uniformly flexible (I like plexiglass offcuts), lay out your minimum vertical curve along the edge. One end of the edge is straight. The line starts to curve after about 6", in to an offset calculated (or taken from Larry Blanchard's 'middle ordinate' table) at the other end. Then plane or sand the wood to the line.


Edited by - jbvb on 11/22/2009 08:00:35 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 5640 Go to Top of Page

Steve R
Section Hand

Posted - 02/06/2010 :  11:54:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi all,

Does anyone know the the track center spacing of the walthers double crossover(#948-8812). The Reference book gives a length but not spacing.

Thanks.

Have a good one.
Steve R



Country: Canada | Posts: 59 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/07/2010 :  8:32:22 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
One throat of my staging yard uses three #6 3-way switches. I have an older Walthers 3-way switch in another hidden location, and liked it: the gauge was good throughout and the point contacts work, keeping the remote hand-throw mechanism simple. But all I could get for the new project was the DCC-friendly version, and from helping a friend with his module, I knew these had a problem: There's a short piece of rail between the frogs closest to the points that's jumpered to one of the closure rails, rather than connected to either frog. This can cause shorts when using the straight route.



This shows the jumper I removed to isolate that bit of rail. It popped out when I lifted it with a knife; if it had been more firmly attached I would have cut it at the closure rail end and used it as a feeder.

Powering the frogs was simplified because the two closest to the points can always have the same polarity. And because this will be hidden, I wasn't concerned with appearance, only operation. So I got out the resistance soldering outfit (if I didn't have one, I might not have started this project):



I bridged from frog to dead rail to one side of the middle frog with a single piece of 24 gauge telco wire (don't try doing this on the gauge side of the rail, don't ask how I know). Then I looped under the ties and connected to the other side of the middle frog.



I also soldered feeders to the closure rails, and to the remaining frog. Then I drilled holes in the roadbed, installed the switch, checked everything with my .0188-wheeled boxcar and my ohmmeter and soldered the rail joints.

Gotchas: The first time I tried this (on the gauge side) , I melted the bit of rail between the frogs loose, but luckily I was able to get it back into place, supported by the jumper wire . Then when I looked for resistance, I found a partial short between the long guard rail and the straight running rail. A spike separated them. Finally, I found that one of Walther's jumpers on the underside had come loose from the base of the rail at one end. I was able to re-solder it using the resistance outfit, but this would be almost impossible to do with an iron or gun.



Edited by - jbvb on 04/18/2011 2:02:21 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 5640 Go to Top of Page

trisonic
Section Hand



Posted - 04/16/2010 :  2:26:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Excuse the noob here!

I want to learn to hand lay (HO at first) track. Is the Fast Track system a good place to start? Does anyone have experience of this good or bad?
Looking for ideas.
Many thanks, Pete.



Country: USA | Posts: 63 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 04/16/2010 :  10:09:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by trisonic

Excuse the noob here!

I want to learn to hand lay (HO at first) track. Is the Fast Track system a good place to start? Does anyone have experience of this good or bad?
Looking for ideas.
Many thanks, Pete.



Hi Pete and welcome.
I have never hand laid track and thus have no personal experience with the Fast Track System.

That said many members here on the forum have used the system and highly recommend it.

Also Tim the owner is a sponsor of Railroad-Line and has a forum about his products.

Click on the link below which will take you to his forum and then the newest post is a video which should answer any questions you may have.

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/forum.asp?FORUM_ID=83



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13289 Go to Top of Page

trisonic
Section Hand



Posted - 04/17/2010 :  04:47:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
D'oh!
Thanks, John. I'm still feeling my way around this place..............

Best, Pete.



Country: USA | Posts: 63 Go to Top of Page

bitlerisvj
Fireman

Posted - 04/18/2011 :  11:58:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Pete,
Fast Tracks is about the best place you can go to learn and do handlaid track. I do not use any of their Track assmebly fixtures, but know several people that do. If you plan on using standard turnouts, you can't go wrong. The fixtures are a bit pricey, but if you are going to make a bunch of #6 turnouts, the price will end up being minimal. I do recommend the filing jigs for points and frogs, they are very nice aids for someone who has never done it before. Their templates are very nice and you print them out on a regular printer. The most important piece of Fast Tracks is the process they describe. In my opinion, this is absolutely the best way to handlay turnouts. A lot of people glue down and spike their turnouts, and I used to do that also, but then they have a tendency to go out of gauge and setting them back in can be tricky. Soldering the rail to PC ties is the best way to do it. I suggest to spend some time on the Fast Track site and review all of their tutorials, then make up your mind.
Using their methods, I can build 2 turnouts, curved or straight in about an hour and a half.
Good luck and regards, Vic Bitleris

quote:
Originally posted by trisonic

Excuse the noob here!

I want to learn to hand lay (HO at first) track. Is the Fast Track system a good place to start? Does anyone have experience of this good or bad?
Looking for ideas.
Many thanks, Pete.




Country: USA | Posts: 1420 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/30/2012 :  10:57:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
A couple of simple techniques illustrated:



Compromise joint in HO between 1970s Atlas Code 100 and handlaid Code 70: My hands are steady, so I used a cutoff disk to cut in from the end, then down from the top. After a little cleanup with a file, the tops of the railheads were even. Then I glued 1/16" x 3/32" basswood ties under the end of the Code 100 to make it less risky to solder the rails together. 3/32" square ties (I use the stock for bridge ties too) under the code 70 bring it up to the right height.



Here I needed a ditch between railroad property and the industrial facility. The 1/2" Homasote is supported on 1/2" plywood. I cut the ditches with a few strokes of a utility knife for each slope.



Country: USA | Posts: 5640 Go to Top of Page
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